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wolf

4 days ago
wolf
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@lylethecrocodile Ha Ha! Thats me to!
35-famous-latin-phrases-to-add-to-your-vocabulary-and-what-they-mean

The vast majority of people associate Latin with doctors' prescriptions, because, as we know, they are written in Latin. But at the same time, there are many well-known phrases in Latin, which, no, no, and you will meet in someone's speech.


People who can speak this ancient language are perceived by others as educated. But sometimes it’s not at all necessary to learn it “from and to”, it’s enough to remember a few common phrases and, if necessary, flaunt them in a conversation - and then you will certainly look smarter in the eyes of other people. Moreover, you already know something: for example, alma mater, persona non grata, etc.


Learn to speak Latin


Bemorepanda has collected 35 Latin expressions (and their meanings) that can be used in conversation. The main thing is that they are "on topic".


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


1. "Mulgere hircum" - "Milk a goat"


This Latin phrase means trying to do something impossible. Which makes sense, given that it's impossible to milk a goat.


2. "Festina lente" - "Hurry slowly"


In fact, this expression calls to act quickly, but prudently, carefully. Augustus, the Roman emperor, often chastised his generals, advising them to "make haste slowly" because he thought that haste was dangerous.


3. "Persona non grata" - "Persona non grata" ("Unwanted person")


Refers to a person who is not welcome or is not wanted to go anywhere due to their behavior or other reasons. For example: "He became persona non grata in our company after his indecent behavior."


4. "Alma mater" - "Caring mother"


This refers to the educational institution that a person once attended: school, college, university.


5. "Veni, vidi, vici" - "I came, I saw, I conquered"


Julius Caesar is believed to have used the phrase in a letter he wrote to the Roman Senate in 47 BC to inform them of his victory over the Pontic king Pharnaces II near Zela.


6. "Acta, non verba" - "Deeds, not words"


In other words, "More action - less words." That is, always back up your words with deeds or act in accordance with what you say.


7. "Ad meliora" - "For the better"


8. "Mortuum flagellas" - "Smack the dead"


This Latin phrase means a useless action towards someone who will not be affected in any way.


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


9. "Amicus certus in re incerta cernitur" - "Friends are known in the hour of need"


We have it sounds like "A friend in need is known."


10. "Malo mori quam foedari" - "Better death than dishonor"


11. "De gustibus non est disputandum" - "Tastes do not argue"


Tastes are evaluated more subjectively than objectively - everyone has their own.


12. "Lupus in fabula" - "Wolf in a fairy tale"


With the meaning "Speak about the wolf and he will come" (from Terence's play "Adelfoy").


13. "Alea iacta est" - "The die is cast"


This is another phrase Julius Caesar uttered when he entered Italy and started a protracted civil war against Pompey and the optimates. The meaning of the phrase is "There is no going back."


14. "Carpe diem" - "Seize the moment"


Another Latin phrase that is often used these days. The saying aims to motivate people to focus on the present, not the future, and make the most of it.


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


15. "Aut Caesar aut nihil" - "Either Caesar, or nothing"


It is pretty much the Latin equivalent of "All or Nothing". The notorious Italian Cardinal Cesare Borgia lived according to this principle. Now this phrase can be used to denote an adamant desire to succeed.


16. "Ad astra per aspera" - "Through adversity to the stars"


For us, the sound is more familiar: “Through thorns to the stars,” but the essence of this does not change.


17. "Pecunia non olet" - "Money does not smell"


It is believed that the history of the origin of this expression is as follows. When the Roman emperor Vespasian introduced a tax on public toilets, his son Titus complained about the "disgusting" nature of the money. Vespasian held up a gold coin and asked if it smelled, and he himself answered: non olet ("it does not smell"). From here, the phrase was expanded to pecunia non olet - "Money does not smell."


18. "Mea culpa" - "My fault"


This Latin phrase is used to admit one's fault or mistake.


19. "De facto" - "Actually"


De facto describes a real situation, though not necessarily intentional or legal. For example: Whatever is on the calendar, Florida is de facto summer. Or: De facto, it is he who is the leader at the moment.


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


20. "Et cetera" - "And so on"


Perhaps every student's favorite expression when they simply can't name more examples.


21. "Nitimur in vetitum" - "We strive for the forbidden"


Means that when we are denied something, we will want it even more. Think of Eve, who ate the forbidden fruit. No wonder they say: "Forbidden fruit is sweet."


22. "In vino veritas" - "Truth is in wine"


This Latin proverb implies that a person under the influence of alcohol is more inclined to express his hidden desires and thoughts.


The same as "What is on the sober mind, the drunk on the tongue."


23. "Quid pro quo" - "Something for something"


In other words, quid pro quo. Basically, this Latin phrase means favor in exchange for something.


24. "Status quo" - "The current state (of affairs)"


Applies to the current situation. For example: "The maintenance of such a status quo only weakened our already fragile positions."


25. "Audentes fortuna iuvat" - "Fortune favors the brave"


Apparently, these were the last words of Pliny the Elder before he sailed from the docks of Pompeii in 79 to save his friend Pomponianus from the eruption of Vesuvius.


In the same sense as "Who does not risk, he does not drink champagne" or "The courage of the city takes."


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


26. "Amor vincit omnia" - "Love conquers all"


This Latin saying originally appeared in Virgil's Eclogues (X, 69) in the 1st century BC. The phrase means unshakable love that will endure any trials and overcome all obstacles that stand in the way. Therefore, they often say: "There are no barriers to love."


27. "Surdo oppedere" - "Burp in front of the deaf"


Simply put, according to Desiderius Erasmus' Adagia (1508), surdo oppedere means a useless action.


Well, or in our manner: “Throw pearls in front of pigs”, that is, it’s pointless to prove or explain something to someone, because he still won’t understand or appreciate it.


28. "Cui bono?" "Good for who?"


This term implies that one should look for the culprit in the person to whom the unpleasant event will benefit / benefit.


29. "Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes" - "Fear the Danaans who bring gifts"


This expression from the Aeneid, the Latin epic poem by Virgil, was uttered by the Trojan priest Laocoön when he warned his fellow Trojans about accepting the Trojan horse from the Greeks.


An alternative translation could be: "Do not trust your enemies who bring you gifts", as this may be to your detriment.


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


30. “Homo sum humani a me nihil linearum puto” - “I am a man, therefore nothing human is alien to me”


Something like “We are all people, we are all people” (the expression came from Russian classical literature). It means that any person has weaknesses or can stumble, do something unseemly.


31. "Sine qua non" - "Sine qua non"


Refers to something absolutely necessary, without which something is impossible.


32. "Qui totum vult totum perdit" - "He who wants everything loses everything."


From the same series as "You want a lot - you get a little."


33. "Solamen miseris socios habuisse doloris" - "Misfortune loves company"


It is understood that it is a consolation for the unfortunate that others share their grief.


We usually say: "Together, grief is easier to bear."


34. "Oderint dum metuant" - "Let them hate, if only they were afraid"


Favorite saying of Caligula, originally attributed to Lucius Actius, Roman tragic poet (170 BC); also the motto of the Russian noble family Krasnitsky.


35. "Cogito, ergo sum" - "I think, therefore I am"


This famous phrase by René Descartes may seem vague and confusing, but it was the result of his unique, individualistic approach to philosophy. According to him, many of the world's problems stem from the way we use our minds - from misunderstanding, poor definition, and unintentional illogicality.



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@dray25 😄 good to know 😄

Stop it

17 hours ago

Video is being processed...

Feel free to roam the site while you wait.

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@Misterstaley This is a Gif to express the need for something or someone to "stop it" or "cut it out"

Pie of the dead

18 hours ago
pie-of-the-dead
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@Wangchowder86 In retrospect it should have been the Necronomnomnimiconfection
cursed-image-meme
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@GoofyBigMonke69 Completely original meme about genetics and incomplete dominance! (You science nerds will get that joke lmao)
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