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How correctly to use a bicycle.😀

3 years ago
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Love yourself.🥰

3 years ago
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10-myths-about-how-you-really-need-to-eat-right-and-why-science-decides-everything-here

There are many beliefs in our society that, upon closer examination, turn out to be prejudices. It is better not to eat animal milk, diabetics should not eat fruits, vegetarians will not last long without protein ... Let's figure out with the help of experts in the field of edible and inedible who is our enemy and who is our friend.


We have found and debunked several popular myths about proper nutrition.


At Bemorepanda, we liked the advice of the American writer, educator and health food activist Michael Pollan the best. It has only 7 words. Read with us.


Myth #1: Fresh fruits and vegetables are always healthier than canned, frozen, or dried ones.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

Despite the strong opinion that "fresh is better", studies have shown that frozen, canned and dried fruits and vegetables can be just as nutritious and healthy as fresh ones.


“They can also help save money and be an easy way to ensure that families have consistent fruits and vegetables,” says Sarah Bleach, former director of food security and health equity at the USDA and professor of public health policy at the Harvard T. X. Chan. "One word of caution: Some types of canned, frozen, and dried foods contain ingredients such as sugar, saturated fat, and sodium, so be sure to read product labels and look for foods that are low in these additives."


Myth #2: All fats are bad.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

When studies published in the late 1940s found a relationship between a high-fat diet and high blood cholesterol, experts decided that reducing the total amount of fat in the diet would reduce the risk of heart disease.


By the 1980s, doctors, health experts, the food industry, and the media were reporting that a low-fat diet could benefit everyone, although there was no conclusive evidence that it could prevent cardiovascular disease, overweight and obesity.


Dr. Vijaya Surampudi, assistant professor of medicine at UCLA's Center for Human Nutrition, says that as a result of the negative message about fat, many people - and food manufacturers - have begun to replace calories from fat with calories from refined carbohydrates (white flour and sugar).


Suffice it to recall the effect of low-calorie SnackWell cookies, when people began to overeat, confident that this is acceptable, since the food is dietary. “Instead of helping fellow citizens stay lean, this approach has led to an increase in overweight and obesity,” she explains.


In reality, Dr. Surampudi added, not all fats are bad. While some fats, including saturated and trans fats, can increase your risk of disease, healthy monounsaturated fats (found in olive and other vegetable oils, avocados, some nuts and seeds) and polyunsaturated fats (found in sunflower and other vegetable oils, walnuts) , fish and flaxseed) help reduce the risk.


"Good" fats are also important for providing energy, producing important hormones, maintaining cellular function, and absorbing certain nutrients.


If you see a product labeled "fat-free," don't automatically think it's healthy, says Dr. Surampudi. Instead, opt for foods with simple ingredients and no added sugar.


Myth #3: “Calories in, calories out” is the most important factor for long-term weight maintenance.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

It's true that if you take in more calories than you burn, you're more likely to gain weight. And if you're burning more calories than you're consuming, you should be losing weight—at least in the short term.


However, the study does not suggest that eating more food will lead to sustained weight gain, i.e. obesity or obesity.


"Rather, it's the types of foods we eat that may be long-term drivers of these conditions," said Dr. Dariusz Mozaffarian, professor of nutrition and medicine at Tufts University's Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.


Over-processed foods—refined starch snacks, cereals, crackers, energy bars, baked goods, soda, and sweets—can be especially harmful to weight gain because they digest quickly and fill the blood with glucose, fructose, and amino acids, which are converted into fat by the liver. Instead, maintaining a healthy weight requires a shift from counting calories to prioritizing healthy eating in general—quality over quantity.


Myth #4: People with type 2 diabetes shouldn't eat fruit.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

This myth arose because fruit juices, which can raise blood sugar levels due to their high glucose and low fiber content, are confused with whole fruits.


However, it is not. Some studies show, for example, that those who consume one serving of whole fruits per day — especially blueberries, grapes, and apples — have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.


According to other scientific sources, if you already have type 2 diabetes, then eating whole fruits can help you control your blood sugar levels.


It's time to dispel that myth, says Dr. Linda Shiue, GP and director of health nutrition and lifestyle at Kaiser Permanente San Francisco: Everyone, including type 2 diabetics, needs healthy nutrients found in fruit - fiber, vitamins , minerals and antioxidants.


Myth #5: Plant-based milk is healthier than animal-based milk.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

There is an opinion that vegetable milk, for example, from oats, almonds, rice, is more useful and nutritious than cow's.


“That's just not true,” says Kathleen Merrigan, a professor of sustainable food systems at Arizona State University and a former US assistant secretary of agriculture. “Consider protein: Generally, cow’s milk has about eight grams of protein per cup, while almond milk has one to two grams and oat milk has about two to three grams per cup.”


Plant-based drinks can vary in nutritional value, Dr. Merrigan said, but many contain more added ingredients, such as sodium and sugar, that will degrade health faster than cow's milk.


Myth #6: White potatoes are unhealthy.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

Potatoes are often frowned upon in the nutrition community due to their high glycemic index, which means they contain fast-digesting carbohydrates that raise blood sugar levels. However, potatoes may actually be good for your health, says Dafena Altema-Johnson, food community and public health program officer at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Better Future.


It is rich in vitamin C, potassium, fiber and other nutrients, especially when eaten with the skin. In addition, potatoes are inexpensive and available year-round in grocery stores, making this product more affordable. The most useful cooking methods are: frying, baking, boiling and air grilling.


Myth #7: Peanut foods should not be given to infants in their first years of life.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

For a long time, experts have been telling new parents that the best way to prevent food allergies in children is to not feed them allergenic foods like peanuts or eggs for the first few years of life. But now, according to allergy experts, it's best to introduce peanut products to your child's diet as early as possible.


If your child does not have severe eczema or an identified food allergy, you can start introducing peanut products (such as water-diluted peanut butter, peanut puffs, or peanut powder, but not whole peanuts) at about 4-6 months, when your child is ready for solid food. “Start with two teaspoons of smooth peanut butter mixed with water, breast milk, or formula two to three times a week,” advises Dr. Ruchi Gupta, professor of pediatrics and director of the Feinberg Northwestern School of Medicine Center for Food Allergy and Asthma Research. . - If your baby has severe eczema, first ask your pediatrician or allergist about whether you can start giving peanut products at about 4 months.


It is also important to feed your baby a variety of foods in the first year of life to prevent food allergies,” says Dr. Gupta.


Myth #8: Plant protein is incomplete.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

"Where do you get protein from?" is the #1 question vegans get asked,” says Christopher Gardner, a nutrition scientist and professor of medicine at Stanford University. The myth is that plants are completely lacking in certain amino acids, also known as the building blocks of proteins. But in fact, plant foods contain all 20 amino acids, including the nine essential, essential amino acids.”


“The only difference is that the ratio of these amino acids is not as ideal as in animal products. Therefore, to get an adequate portion of nutrients, you just need to eat a variety of plant foods throughout the day: beans, grains and nuts and consume enough protein in general. Most people in prosperous countries get everything they need: it's easier than many people think, ”says Dr. Gardner.


Myth #9: Eating soy-based foods can increase your risk of breast cancer.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

The high doses of plant estrogens in soy, called isoflavones, stimulate the growth of breast tumor cells (according to animal studies).


“In humans, this association has not been confirmed,” says Dr. Frank B. Hu, professor and chair of nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan. So far, scientific evidence does not point to a link between soy consumption and the risk of developing breast cancer in humans.


In contrast, consumption of soy-based foods and beverages—such as tofu, tempeh, edamame, miso, and soy milk—may even be protective, reduce the risk of development, and increase survival in this disease. Soy products are also a source of beneficial nutrients associated with a reduced risk of heart disease, including high-quality protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals, adds Dr. Hu. “The results of the study are clear: feel free to include soy products in your diet.”


Myth #10: Basic nutritional guidelines change all the time—and by a lot.

10 myths about how you really need to eat right, and why science decides everything here

“That’s not true,” says Dr. Marion Nestle, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Nutrition, Nutritional Research, and Public Health at New York University. - In the 1950s, the first dietary recommendations for the prevention of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, etc. contained advice to balance calories and minimize foods high in saturated fat, salt, and sugar. Modern dietary guidelines call for the same.”


Yes, science is developing, but the rules of healthy eating remain unchanged. Writer Michael Pollan summed it up in seven simple words: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. According to Dr. Nestle, this council worked 70 years ago and continues to work today. And it leaves plenty of room for eating the foods you love.



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50-ways-to-burn-fat-fast-and-look-perfect-this-summer

To get rid of excess fat, a thoughtfully integrated approach is required. Bemorepanda comes to the rescue with a helpful 50-step weight loss guide.

 

Top 50 weight loss steps

 

It is not necessary to strictly follow all the recommendations, just read the article and choose what is suitable for you. The more points you complete, the easier it will be for you to achieve the desired result.

 

 

1. Eat more protein foods. Approximately 25-30% of the calories you get from protein foods are burned already during digestion, in contrast to carbohydrates, for which this figure is only 6-8%.

 

2. Carefully read the composition of the products. It's simple: eliminate these foods from your diet if you see a lot of corn syrup or sugar. Also, do not forget that low-fat yogurt can contain so much sugar that it is much better to eat a full-fledged product instead of this “diet” one.

 

3. Do the exercises while standing. According to research, any activity performed while standing, rather than sitting, burns 30% more calories.

 

4. Combine exercises. Alternate upper body exercises with lower body exercises. This will allow you to qualitatively work out the muscles with a tiny break between sets, which means that the training will be more effective and take less time.

 

5. Try exercising with your eyes closed. This can only be done during those exercises in which vision does not play a key role when the chance of injury due to temporary blindness is minimal. Without visual information, the muscles will have to work harder to maintain balance, and you will burn more calories.

 

 

6. Don't avoid housework. Cleaning the apartment can be counted as a workout. So broom in hand - and go. ;)

 

7. Snack on pickled or pickled cucumbers. One slice contains only 1 kcal.

 

8. Take more significant steps. Step over a few steps as you climb the stairs, and then walk as you usually would. This alternation of phases involves additional muscles, and as a result, you burn more calories.

 

9. Look for inspiration. Everyone sometimes has periods when you want to quit everything, and you don’t understand why you are doing all this. Therefore, it is better to take care of motivation in advance. Communicate with people who are an example for you, and watch feature films and documentaries about sports and health.

 

10. Set goals for yourself. Run 5K faster, squat 100 times; it could be anything.

 

11. Reduce portions. Just eat less. Use small bowls for this.

 

 

12. Eat fewer carbs. Yes, this has been said a thousand times. But the thousand and first will not be superfluous. In one study, a group of subjects reduced their daily carbohydrate intake by only 8%. As a result, the men lost about 3 kg of fat and gained 1 kg of muscle in 6 weeks.

 

13. Strengthen with extra weight first, then run. After strength training, you will already be tired, which means you will burn many more calories during a short run than if you ran fresh and full of energy. Work less, get more. ;)

 

14. Do some interval training. Alternating intensity is another excellent way to get rid of excess calories.

 

15. Eat more high-fiber foods.

 

16. Use vinegar-based dressing in salads. Vinegar and lemon juice are excellent fat burners.

 

17. Don't skip meals. Skipping lunch and eating a whole elephant for dinner won't help you lose weight; it will only worsen it. Prolonged time without food introduces the body into a catabolic state: muscles will begin to burn for energy.

 

18. Try the VersaClimber. Being upright during cardio exercises burns more calories.

 

 

19. Spend less time watching TV.

 

20. Exercise for at least 10 minutes 3 times a week. This is if you are incredibly lazy.

 

21. Try to eat fewer potato dishes. Potatoes raise blood insulin levels and cause your body to stop burning calories and start storing fat.

 

22. A large portion of food - only after strength training. According to research from the University of Nevada, digesting food after strength training burns 73% more calories than digesting food without prior exercise.

 

23. Drink water before meals. There will be less room for food in the stomach.

 

24. Replace potato, pasta, and cereal side dishes with vegetables.

 

 

25. Join a team. Find a running company or join a football, basketball, or other sports team. When you're part of a team, skipping practice or being lazy during class becomes much more difficult.

 

26. Cut down on desserts. If it’s hard to give up ice cream altogether, take just one scoop for a sample instead of the usual two or three.

 

27. Brush your teeth more often. According to research conducted in Japan, men who brush their teeth frequently during the day are leaner than those who brush twice daily. Thanks to the minty taste in the mouth after toothpaste, it is easier to refuse snacks with something sweet.

 

28. Change the number of daily calories consumed. Instead of eating the same number of calories daily, eating more one day and less the next is better. This way, you will keep your metabolism in good shape, and your body will burn more fat than if you adhered to the standard 2,000 kcal per day.

 

29. Always add at least a slight incline when running on the treadmill. Just 1 degree of slope in terms of intensity brings running on the treadmill closer to running outdoors.

 

 

30. Eliminate high-calorie drinks. Water is the best choice.

 

31. Don't skip breakfast. Studies have shown that obesity among those who do not skip breakfast is 35-50% less common than among those who neglect the morning meal.

 

32. Avoid convenience foods. As a rule, they contain a lot of fast carbohydrates. And it certainly won't help you lose weight.

 

33. Snack between main meals. Not cookies, but fruits, vegetables, dried fruits, or nuts. Your body will use energy to digest food throughout the day, not just after breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

 

34. Eat yogurt. According to University of Tennessee research, people who ate a diet high in calcium lost more fat than those who ate fewer calcium-rich foods.

 

35. Order vegetable snacks in restaurants and cafes. And don't skimp on the bread.

 

36. Eat nuts. They perfectly saturate and give the energy necessary for training. As a result, you get enough calories but do not get better.

 

 

37. Keep a calorie diary. Write down what and how much you eat. There are a vast number of unique applications for this.

 

38. Incorporate sprint intervals into your workouts. Short-term loads with small rest intervals do an excellent job burning fat at the capacity limit.

 

39. Watch your mood. Sometimes the desire to snack is not caused by hunger but by stress or anxiety. If you catch yourself frequently eating while experiencing certain emotions, you become emotionally addicted to food. It is imperative to get rid of this.

 

40. Shop for one. If you want to buy cookies or other sweets, instead of the "family" option, choose the smallest package: how much you buy, how much you eat.

 

41. Keep a photo diary. Take a photo of yourself at the beginning of your weight loss struggle, and then take pictures, for example, every month. So progress will be more noticeable, and motivation will increase.

 

 

42. Run not for time but a certain distance. You can slow down and run a shorter length when trying to make it on time. If you are tied to a certain distance, you will not be able to cheat and burn more calories.

 

43. Allow yourself indulgence in the diet once a week. It is hard to stick to a strict diet and do without your favorite food. That is why many do not stand up and break down. So choose one day of the week when you can eat anything. But only in moderation!

 

44. Try the rowing machine.

 

45. Eliminate white bread from your diet. We don't need refined carbohydrates.

 

46. ​​Allow your favorite food. This point is similar to point 43. The more you restrict yourself to your favorite food, the more likely you will break loose. If you want to, then you can, but very little.

 

 

47. Move more. If possible, take a walk during your lunch break, and walk to the subway. If you drive a car, leave it in a parking lot away from the office.

 

48. Keep a sleep schedule. Watching your favorite TV series until 2 am is harmful. Do you remember that we rest and lose weight in a dream?

 

49. Make your sleep more comfortable. Buy a comfortable bed. Hang good blinds or curtains to keep the bedroom dark.

 

50. Eat slowly. The signal about satiety reaches our brain approximately 12 minutes after the end of lunch. The slower we chew food, the less we eat.

 

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