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Super offer! Cypriot government pays for your holiday if you become infected with the new coronavirus in Cyprus

2 years ago
super-offer-cypriot-government-pays-for-your-holiday-if-you-become-infected-with-the-new-coronavirus-in-cyprus

The operation to attract tourists in times of pandemic has begun.  With more and more people preferring to stay home this summer for fear of the new coronavirus, countries that base their economy on tourism are doing everything they can to persuade them to travel.  The Cypriot authorities have announced a new measure: they will cover the cost of the holiday for tourists tested positive after entering this country.


 The Cypriot government announced on Thursday that it will cover the cost of the holiday for any tourist who will contract the new coronavirus in Cyprus.

Authorities have pledged to cover the cost of accommodation, food, drink and medicines for travelers tested positive for coronavirus after entering Cyprus.  Tourists will only bear the cost of the transfer to the airport and the return ticket to the country of origin.


 A hospital with a capacity of 100 beds will only be made available to foreign visitors who contract the virus and extra beds can be provided if needed, according to the government.


 For travelers with severe symptoms, authorities will provide 112 seats for intensive care and 200 medical ventilators.

 A number of 500 rooms in "quarantine hotels" will be offered to close contacts of people infected with coronavirus.  And this number can be supplemented as needed.


 The hotel room where a tourist who contracted the virus was accommodated will be carefully disinfected before being used again.


 According to Johns Hopkins University, 939 cases of Covid-19 and 17 deaths from the disease have been confirmed in Cyprus.


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the-worlds-longest-commercial-flight-was-caused-by-coronavirus

The coronavirus spreads and continuously affects everyone, no matter where, on plane or ground. The virus resulted a new record for the world's longest commercial flight in distance, after an Air Tahiti Nui plane was forced to fly from French Polynesia to France in an epic, nonstop, 16-hour trip across 9,765-miles.

 

On March 14, Air Tahiti Nui flight TN064 from Tahiti to Paris became the longest recorded scheduled passenger flight by distance, The Independent reports. It took it flight from Papeete at 3 a.m., on the local time, on Saturday and touched the ground at Charles De Gaulle airport in Paris at 6:30 a.m. local time on Sunday, according to the New York Post.

Though the flight there is a stop in Los Angeles to pick up passengers and refuel, but not this time, due to imposed bans, it was prohibited for the planes that have at the board foreign nations that have been to Europe, to enter the U.S. 

 

From start to finish, the Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner reportedly spent about 15 hours and 45 minutes flying.

Though the Saturday flight happend because of the current travel ban, it beaten the distance record for a 9,534-mile passenger flight between Singapore and Newark, established by Singapore Airlines.

 

What are the top 10 longest flights?

 

  • Singapore Airlines: Newark (EWR) to Singapore (SIN): 9,521 miles; 18 hours, 45 minutes
  • Qatar Airways: Auckland (AKL) to Doha (DOH): 9,032 miles; 17 hours, 40 minutes
  • Qantas: Perth (PER) to London Heathrow (LHR): 9,010 miles; 17 hours, 20 minutes
  • Emirates: Auckland (AKL) to Dubai (DXB): 8,824 miles; 17 hours, 20 minutes
  • United Airlines (until October 27) and Singapore Airlines (starting November 2): Los Angeles (LAX) to Singapore (SIN): 8,770 miles; 17 hours, 15-50 minutes
  • United Airlines: Houston (IAH) to Sydney (SYD): 8,596 miles; 17 hours, 20 minutes
  • Qantas: Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) to Sydney (SYD): 8,578 miles; 17 hours, 15 minutes
  • United Airlines and Singapore Airlines: San Francisco (SFO) to Singapore (SIN): 8,446 miles; 16 hours, 35-40 minutes
  • Delta Air Lines: Johannesburg (JNB) to Atlanta (ATL): 8,439 miles; 16 hours, 27 minutes
  • Etihad: Abu Dhabi (AUH) to Los Angeles (LAX): 8,390 miles; 16 hours, 30 minutes
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greece-has-opened-its-borders-without-a-mandatory-quarantine-only-for-eu-citizens

Greece has opened its borders and started receiving EU citizens without a mandatory quarantine after arrival starting Monday at 11:00 local time, Bulgarian police said.  The opening took place an hour earlier than initially announced, reports BTA from the Kulata crossing point between Bulgaria and Greece.


 The Greek border authorities distribute to persons entering Greece forms to be filled in with the full name of the person and the destination of the journey.  Coronavirus tests are performed randomly.  If the test is positive, the person will be quarantined for 14 days.


 A long line of vehicles waiting to cross the border formed early Monday morning, and by noon the queue was several kilometres long.  The cars waiting at Kulata came from Bulgaria, Romania, Germany and other European countries, according to BTA.

 Greece also reopened its two major airports, Athens and Thessaloniki, on Monday, while regional airports are set to reopen on July 1.


 As at the land borders, random tests for COVID-19 will be conducted at Athens and Thessaloniki airports by June 30.  "Those who will be tested will have to wait for the result - that is, one day - in a hotel of their choice.  If someone is tested positive, he will remain in quarantine for 14 days, "Greek government spokesman Stelios Petsas was quoted as saying in a press briefing on Monday.


 Greek authorities also reopened all museums in the country on Monday, after visitors were allowed to visit only a few archaeological sites in late May.  Visitors and leisure parks, hot springs, gyms and other places related to the tourist season have also been waiting for their visitors since Monday.

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100-interesting-and-fun-facts-about-london-that-you-didnt-know

London is the capital of Great Britain and one of the largest cities in Europe, which is the world center of culture, music, education, fashion, politics, finance and trade. It is a vibrant and bustling metropolis with a dynamic life and a wonderful cosmopolitan atmosphere. London is one of the oldest cities in Europe, which has an amazing concentration of a variety of sights, historical and cultural monuments: luxurious palaces, historical buildings, towers, bridges, ancient churches, attractions and world-class museums.


London was founded during the Roman Empire and throughout its rich history has been one of the most important cities in Europe. All the wealth of the United Kingdom flocked here, so its capital has magnificent sights from various historical eras. London is one of the most multifaceted cities in the world, which has absorbed not only the traditions of Britain, but also the cultures of many nationalities and peoples. It is a place of amazing diversity to be discovered and explored endlessly.


London can be visited all year round, so the best time to visit it depends entirely on your preferences. There are fewer tourists in the capital of the United Kingdom during the off-season, so it's easier to book a good hotel and you can comfortably explore the city. There are many festivals and cultural events in London in the summer, but there are also many more tourists.


London is one of the world's shopping capitals. Here is the largest department store in Europe - Harrods, where you can find almost everything. Also in the capital of Great Britain is a huge shopping center - Westfield, which includes 300 stores. The main shopping area is the West End (Oxford Street, Regent Street, Bond Street, Piccadilly and Covent Garden). Near London Bridge is the Borough food market, although it is relatively expensive. Brushfield is home to an old fruit market that now sells up-and-coming designers, housewares and food.


Food in London caters to all tastes. Here you can find everything from fast food and inexpensive pubs to exclusive restaurants. In London, a standard tourist rule applies - food near popular attractions and in the central part of the city is more expensive. Many locals go to restaurants in residential and working areas, where the quality of food and service is higher and prices are lower.


Below you can read more interesting facts



1. The English capital is about two thousand years old. No one knows the exact date of foundation.


2. In the past, London was known as Londinium, Augusta, Lundenwick and Lundenburch.


3. Native Englishmen make up about 50% of the population of the capital of Great Britain. The rest are mostly from Africa and Asia.


4. The first Londinium was burned by the Britons during their revolt against the Romans.


5. In the 9th century, a huge army of pagan Vikings captured half of England, avenging the death of their king Ragnar. It controlled the territories of London and its environs for 15 years.


6. Judging by archaeological finds, primitive people lived on the site of modern London long before the foundation of the city.


7. Indigenous people in different parts of London have different accents. Foreigners do not notice this, but the locals determine it accurately.



8. Because of the monstrous prices for real estate, most citizens in London rent a house all their lives, and do not buy it.


9. Every Friday every London pub is packed to capacity. Most locals book tables well in advance.

It is impossible to see a stray cat or dog on the streets of London.


10. Residents of London can easily walk around in a T-shirt and jeans, for example, in November. Like their Irish neighbors, they are not afraid of the cold.


11. The apartments here, with rare exceptions, are very cramped. Many also live in old houses with communication problems.


12. London is in the top 10 most expensive cities in the world every year.


13. Drivers of traditional cabs in London know the whole city from memory down to the small lanes.


 


14. Navigators are not allowed to use them. This rule does not apply to ordinary yellow taxis.


15. You can find at least one bike rental on any major London street.


16. The most popular fast food in London is Indian cuisine.


17. London police officers do not carry firearms.


18. There are usually no washing machines for London apartments, so there is a laundry service on every corner.


19. Every year, people forget about 80,000 umbrellas on the London Underground.


20. Contrary to popular myth, it doesn't rain as often in London as you might think. For example, even in Rome or Milan there is more rainfall than here.



21. According to ancient law, London has the right to refuse the reigning English monarch entry into the capital.


22. Londoners never go out without taking an umbrella with them. Yes, just in case.


23. On one of the branches of the London Underground, trains are fully automated, and they travel without the help of drivers.


24. And here it is customary to leave to read newspapers right in the subway so that someone else can read them. By the way, they are still very popular in London, despite the development of modern technology.


25. The most popular pet in London is a dog, despite the fact that many landlords forbid tenants from keeping pets.


26. Every year, a Christmas tree sent from Norway is set up in London's Trafalgar Square. This is a token of appreciation from the people of Oslo for helping Britain during World War II.



27. Driving into central London costs money.


28. Big Ben is not called the famous London clock tower, but the bell installed in it.


29. Some retail outlets in London only accept credit cards.


30. Most of London's cinemas are specialized - one shows comedies, another shows Hollywood blockbusters, and a third shows retro movies.


31. There are about 5,000 pubs in London. This is more than even in Dublin.


32. Most of London's museums are free to enter, but donations are welcome.


33. About 20 underground rivers flow under London.



34. The multinationality of London society is evidenced by the fact that the locals speak about 300 different languages.


35. Among all the cities in the world, London occupies one of the first places in terms of the number of billionaires living in it.


36. The famous movable Tower Bridge in London weighs 2000 tons, while it takes just one minute to open.


37. It was here that the world's first subway was built.


38. The foggy London stereotype arose from the fact that during the era of the development of local industry, the city was constantly wrapped in thick smog. In fact, fogs are rare here, and mostly in the cold season.


39. In summer it is rarely warmer than +20, but in winter the temperature rarely drops below 0 degrees.


40. In terms of population, London ranks second in Europe, second only to Moscow.



41. Many streets, especially in older areas, are confusing and very winding, so many Londoners carry a map of the city with them.


42. Lines are everywhere here - in museums, pubs and restaurants. Even in the USSR there were not so many queues.


43. London is the only city in the world to have hosted the Olympic Games three times.


44. Less than 50% of Londoners are Christians.


45. The famous Westminster Abbey in London was built over almost 700 years.


46. One of the ancient laws obliges London hotels to accept not only guests, but also their horses.

Buckingham Palace in London consists of 600 rooms.



47. In the USA, as many as 8 cities are called London (interesting facts about the USA).


48. From the center of London to the center of Paris can be reached by high-speed train in just 2 hours.


49. The exact age of London is unknown, but, judging by the chronicles found, it is about two thousand years old.


50. In the Tower of London, the ravens that live there are looked after by a special caretaker. There is a legend that Great Britain will fall when these birds leave the Tower (see interesting facts about birds).


51. There are two types of taxis in London - ordinary and traditional London cabs. To get a cab driver's license, you have to pass the most difficult test on the knowledge of absolutely all London streets, because traditionally cab drivers do not use maps or navigators.


52. London is the largest city in the European Union, and concurrently the second largest in Europe as a whole.



53. Founded by the Romans, London was originally called in the Roman manner - Londinium.


54. For a hundred years, from 1985 to 1925, London was the largest city in the world.


55. Every year at Christmas in Trafalgar Square in London, a Christmas tree is sent from Oslo. This is a token of gratitude for the help provided to Norway during the Second World War (see interesting facts about Oslo).


56. Driving into the center of London during the daytime is paid, and, by the way, costs a lot - ten pounds sterling.


57. There is a statue of George Washington in London, but it was installed on land brought from the United States, because Washington declared during his lifetime that "do not set foot on English soil again."


58. London's famous Big Ben is not a tower, contrary to popular myth. "Big Ben" is the name of the bell tower installed there, and the tower itself is called "Elizabeth"


.


59. Twenty hidden rivers flow under London (see interesting facts about rivers).


60. The code of rules for ships entering London harbor still allows the constable of the Tower to demand a barrel of rum from each ship as a duty.


61. The inhabitants of London speak more than three hundred languages, which makes London the most multilingual city in the world. However, in English here anyway, of course, everyone speaks.


62. Local law forbids you from hailing a taxi on the streets of London if you are infected with the plague.


63. All London buses became red in 1907. Before that, they were painted in different colors.


64. London is the largest city in the UK. About a third less people live here than in Moscow, and almost fifty times more than in Paris.


65. One of London's museums houses a collection of items left behind by passengers on the London Underground. It includes such extravagant items as a human skull, a samurai sword, a coffin and a puffer fish.



66. London Heathrow Airport receives and sends more international flights than any other airport in the world.


67. During the fire of 1666 in London, about 70 thousand people were left without a roof over their heads, despite the fact that then the population of this city was only 80 thousand.


68. The world's first zoo opened in London. This significant event took place back in 1828.


69. There are over a thousand streets in London.


70. Contrary to popular belief, London is not a rainy city at all. On the contrary, it is one of the driest in Europe. But there are really many cloudy days here.


71. Buses in London run around the clock.



72. The cheapest transport in London is a bicycle. You can rent it on almost every street, and a daily rental will cost half the price of the shortest metro ride.


73. In 2012, the city hosted the Olympics for the third time, no other city has received such an honor.


74. Many museums in London are free to visit, although you can make a voluntary donation if you wish.


75. Eternal rain in London is a common myth. In fact, there is no more precipitation here than, for example, in Rome, but it can start to rain suddenly and end just as suddenly, so it is customary for locals to always carry an umbrella with them.


76. The London Eye Ferris wheel is one of the largest in the world. There are 32 booths fixed on the circle (according to the number of districts of the city), each of which can accommodate 25 people. A full turn of the wheel takes half an hour. The "Eye" is an important element of the pyrotechnic shows that are held on New Year's Eve and other holidays; fireworks are also launched from it.



77. If Japanese restaurants and pizzerias are widespread in Russia, then in London the championship belongs to Indian cuisine.


78. There are as many as 6 airports in London and its environs. Heathrow is the most famous of them, and also the busiest in Europe.


79. There are almost no traffic jams in the central part of the city. The secret is simple - since 2003, on weekdays, entry here is paid and is more than 12 pounds. Moreover, entry in an old car that does not meet environmental standards will cost twice as much.


80. The London Underground is one of the largest in the world with 270 stations. It is also the oldest in the world, its first branch was opened in 1863. The people call the subway Underground (“subway”) or Tube (“pipe”). The fare varies depending on the metro area. The stations have special places for musicians to perform, and it is customary to leave the newspapers in the car, where someone else can read them.


81. London has a Tramlink tram system, but it operates only in south London in the Croydon area and has only 4 routes. The fact is that there is no subway in this part of the city.



82. London is the only place where you need to study to become a taxi driver, and the training takes several years and involves passing the most difficult exams. The fact is that it is not customary for local taxi drivers to use maps, and even more so navigators, they must remember all the streets and even houses by heart! Not surprisingly, about 70% of applicants do not stand up to training. Naturally, we are talking about black taxi cabs that have become the hallmark of the city. It is they who have the right to play the streets and put passengers anywhere, but the prices in them bite. There are also simpler taxis in the city, but they only work on specific calls. If you need to use a transfer to the airport, we recommend that you order a Russian taxi in London. Reasonable price and quality service guaranteed.


83. Famous red double decker buses are called double deckers. The first buses of this type appeared on the streets in 1956.


84. In many places of the city there are parking lots with bicycles that can be rented with a bank card.


85. The Greenwich meridian passes through London, which in 1884 was decided to be considered zero (until that moment, different countries counted longitude from their national meridians). It used to pass through the observatory in the town of Greenwich, but now the town has become one of the districts of the sprawling capital.



86. Under London there are many underground rivers and streams. In the Victorian era, they were hidden underground - in the sewer system. At that time, it was the right decision, because Londoners threw garbage at them and poured sewage.


87. The Tower of London on the banks of the Thames is considered one of the oldest buildings in the UK. Its construction is attributed to William I, the legendary Norman conqueror who radically changed the whole way of Great Britain. Construction began in 1066 and ended in 1078. Later, Richard the Lionheart ordered to build several more towers and dig a moat around the fortress, and from 1190 the fortress gradually began to turn into a prison and a place of executions, and representatives of the nobility and even unsuccessful monarchs often became prisoners. King Henry VIII and his descendants were especially zealous in this matter in the 16th-17th centuries. It was only after World War II that they stopped keeping prisoners. Part of the fortress was occupied for a long time by the mint and the menagerie, later transferred to the London Zoo. Today, the Tower has become a museum and repository of the treasures of the British crown. Among the staff of the modern Tower there is a ravenmaster - an employee who monitors the well-being of the local flock of crows. There is a belief that when they leave the fortress, many misfortunes await the country. To prevent this from happening, crows have their wings clipped.


88. Big Ben is another well-known landmark that is actually not called that. The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster bears the name of Elizabeth, and "Big Ben" is not even the name of the clock, but the largest of the six bells inside the tower.



89. The London Zoo has been operating since 1828 and is the oldest in the world. Interestingly, it does not receive government funding and exists on proceeds from ticket sales, charitable fees and donations.


90. Like other major cities, London has not been spared by great tragedies. In 1952, the Great Smog hung over the city for several days - a toxic fog that led to the death of several thousand people. Immediately after this environmental disaster, the Clean Air Act was passed, but London is still considered one of the most polluted European cities today.


91. In 1666, during the Great Fire of London, most of the city burned out in just three days. The exact number of victims is unknown, the fact remains that more than 80% of the population was left homeless, and the restoration of the city took more than a dozen years. Although everything can be found pluses. For example, the fire helped to cope with the Great Plague Epidemic, which at that time had been raging in the capital for a year.


92. The Great Stench is another environmental disaster in London's history. In 1858, there was no sewerage in the largest city in Europe. And during the hot summer, the Thames overflowed with sewage and poisoned the surrounding areas. Cholera began to spread (they did not yet know that it was transmitted through water), there was a disgusting stench, residents fled to the suburbs, and the British Parliament resigned. The disaster ended by itself with the advent of rainy weather, but the government realized that the problem had to be dealt with somehow, and a year later a sewer system appeared in London.



93. The city is the main political, cultural and economic center of Britain.


94. In the Tower, a local fortress, a special person watches over the ravens living in its territories. According to one legend, Great Britain will fall immediately after the birds leave the fortress.


95. An interesting fact is that in London, anyone can, instead of a traditional taxi, call a cab - a horse-drawn carriage.


96. There are 20 piped rivers flowing under the surface of London.


97. Did you know that over 300 languages ​​are spoken in this capital, making London the most multilingual city on earth. But there is no doubt that everyone here knows English.


98. The British take their culture and traditions very seriously. As a result, the tower constable has the right to demand from the ships entering the harbor - a barrel of rum.


99. By law, a person suffering from the plague is not allowed to call a taxi.


100. Since 1907, all London buses have been painted red, although before that they were of a wide variety of colors and shades.


 


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@Nataly My soul city
ten-countries-that-have-not-been-affected-by-the-coronavirus-pandemic

Every day, almost every country in the world counts its sick or dead because of the new coronavirus.  Brazil has now become the second most affected country, after the United States.  There are few places that have not been affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.  But there are, however, some last "points of resistance" on Earth.


Africa, a continent that seemed spared for a time of pandemic, now has no "untouched" country after including the isolated Lesotho, a high-altitude country, practically an enclave in South Africa, has already announced the first cases, in the middle of the month  May.


 However, some countries seem to be exempt from this wave.  Of the 193 UN-recognized states, only ten have reported no cases of COVID-19.


 Among them is the Samoa Islands, which has a population of 250,000.  Affected by a measles epidemic that took the lives of 70 children, at the end of 2019, this archipelago in Oceania quickly declared a state of emergency, closed its schools and airport.  According to France Info, the head of state ordered the population a period of fasting and prayer.


 North of Australia, Vanuatu, a country in the southern Pacific Ocean, made up of about 80 islands stretching 1,300 kilometers, has not reported any cases of COVID-19.  Devastated by Cyclone Harold on April 6, the small state was reluctant to accept help from abroad, for fear that this aid would bring with it another catastrophe: the coronavirus.


 Another pandemic-spared Pacific state: the Solomon Islands and its 653,000 inhabitants.  The 12 main islands and the 1,000 islets surrounding them have so far had no cases of coronavirus.


Micronesia, a federal state that occupies part of the Caroline Islands archipelago off the Philippines, is also part of these end-of-the-world territories that have so far escaped the coronavirus.

 The same is true of the Republic of Nauru, a slightly larger island-state than Monaco, lost somewhere in the Pacific Ocean.  With 160 tourists a year, it is one of the least visited places in the world.  The island banned travelers from China, South Korea, Italy and then Iran, however, and suspended flights from Fiji, Kiribati and Marshall Islands.


 Further west, between the Philippines and Indonesia, the Palau Islands, in the heart of the Pacific Ocean, have also benefited from their geographical isolation.  Despite coronavirus contamination in late northern Mariana Islands in the east, the government has not reported any cases of COVID-19.  Instead, this small country is facing significant supply shortages.  Prior to the pandemic, United Airlines had six flights a week between Guam and Palau.  Now there is only one flight a week.

 The Marshall Islands, made up of volcanoes and coral atolls and populated by only 75,000 inhabitants, have also remained untouched by the coronavirus.


 No cases have been reported in the island republic of Kiribati, with its 33 atolls, located between Polynesia and Micronesia.

All of these countries are spread across the Pacific Ocean, sometimes thousands of miles from a large city.  This geographical isolation, which does not usually bring them benefits, has now proven to be a lifeline, especially as there are countries that usually do not have very strong health systems.  There are small and fragile populations, which do not have, for example, artificial ventilation devices.  If an epidemic broke out, their population could be decimated.


 Two "free" coronavirus countries should be viewed with reluctance


 There are two other countries that, so far, have not declared any case of contamination with the new coronavirus: North Korea and Turkmenistan.  In both cases, the information must be viewed with reluctance, because it is governed by authoritarian regimes, too reluctant to communicate, especially when it comes to recognizing an epidemic.


 In fact, North Korea placed its military forces in isolation for 30 days, according to the head of the American troops stationed in South Korea.


 In Turkmenistan, you are not even allowed to talk about coronavirus.  The state media remains silent and the term does not appear in medical leaflets distributed in schools, hospitals and workplaces, according to Chroniques du Turkménistan, one of the few independent sources of information whose website is blocked in Turkmenistan but is hosted by the organization  Reporters Without Borders.

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how-to-protect-yourself-from-coronavirus-if-you-need-to-travel-to-another-city

Important tips to help you reduce the risk of infection on any trip.

The World Health Organization and the American Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that you stay home and not go anywhere until the epidemic is over.

 However, if the trip cannot be postponed in any way, then in this case they also have recommendations that will reduce the risk of infection.  Here are the main ones.

  •  On trains and planes, take the same steps as in other public places - avoid close contact with other people and wear a mask on your face.
  •  Since it is unlikely that you will be able to wash the mask, buy a few disposable ones and change them periodically.
  •  Clean your hands as often as possible.  Take with you a sufficient amount of alcohol-based hand sanitizer (at least 60% alcohol).  It is not as effective as hand washing, but it is better than nothing.  Remember that you need to grind the brush for at least 30 seconds.
  •  It is especially important to wash your hands after using the toilet, before eating, after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
  • Try not to touch anything with your hands, especially handles, buttons and switches.  Do not touch the face - eyes, nose, and mouth.  Touch surrounding objects as little as possible.
  •  Try to keep a distance with other people.  If possible, choose a way of traveling to be less in contact with anyone.  Ideally, drive alone, so the risk is minimal.
  •  If you feel that you want to sneeze or cough, do it right - covering your mouth and nose with your elbow or disposable towel, which should immediately be thrown into a garbage container.
  •  Disinfect surfaces that people often touch, such as the armrests of seats in public transport, door handles in hotels, various buttons, and so on.
  • Do not eat or drink in public transport.  Although it is now believed that coronavirus cannot be transmitted through food, precaution will not hurt - in order to eat, you will need to remove the mask.  It is better to have a snack before you hit the road.
  •  Use contactless payments, for example, using your smartphone or a supporting card with NFC.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that in buses, trains, and airplanes you will be in a limited space and may become infected if someone sitting 2 meters away has the virus.  Although, during air travel, the risk of inhaling infectious particles of COVID-19 is slightly reduced, since air is filtered on board.  But if a patient is near you, on-board filters are unlikely to help you.


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