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Top 20 safe holiday destinations during the coronavirus pandemic

1 year ago
top-20-safe-holiday-destinations-during-the-coronavirus-pandemic

Many European countries are opening their borders, flights are resuming, hotels are waiting for their first customers, and tourism seems to be slowly coming back to life.  If you are thinking about vacation, here are the top 20 safest holiday destinations during the coronavirus pandemic, where you are very unlikely to get sick.


The European Organization for the Best Destinations (EBD), which is part of the European Commission's EDEN Network, has compiled a list of the 20 safest destinations for travel and tourism, due to coronavirus.  The list taken over by Forbes includes several cities in Poland, Croatia, Greece, but also the city of Sibiu, the only destination in Romania.


To help those who want to travel to Europe, the European Organization for the Best Destinations has presented a list of 20 areas least affected by Covid-19: Tbilisi - Georgia, 

Corfu - Greece, 

Cavtat - Croatia, 

Azores  , 

Preveza - Greece,

 Alentejo - Portugal, 

Batumi - Georgia,

 Zagreb - Croatia,

 Algarve - Portugal, 

Sibiu - Romania,

 Kotor - Montenegro, 

Rijeka - Croatia, 

Warsaw - Poland,

 Vienna - Austria,

 Bohinj - Slovenia,

 Malta, 

Gdansk - Poland  , 

Vilnius - Lithuania, 

Riga - Latvia,

 Wild Taiga - Finland.

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ten-countries-that-have-not-been-affected-by-the-coronavirus-pandemic

Every day, almost every country in the world counts its sick or dead because of the new coronavirus.  Brazil has now become the second most affected country, after the United States.  There are few places that have not been affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.  But there are, however, some last "points of resistance" on Earth.


Africa, a continent that seemed spared for a time of pandemic, now has no "untouched" country after including the isolated Lesotho, a high-altitude country, practically an enclave in South Africa, has already announced the first cases, in the middle of the month  May.


 However, some countries seem to be exempt from this wave.  Of the 193 UN-recognized states, only ten have reported no cases of COVID-19.


 Among them is the Samoa Islands, which has a population of 250,000.  Affected by a measles epidemic that took the lives of 70 children, at the end of 2019, this archipelago in Oceania quickly declared a state of emergency, closed its schools and airport.  According to France Info, the head of state ordered the population a period of fasting and prayer.


 North of Australia, Vanuatu, a country in the southern Pacific Ocean, made up of about 80 islands stretching 1,300 kilometers, has not reported any cases of COVID-19.  Devastated by Cyclone Harold on April 6, the small state was reluctant to accept help from abroad, for fear that this aid would bring with it another catastrophe: the coronavirus.


 Another pandemic-spared Pacific state: the Solomon Islands and its 653,000 inhabitants.  The 12 main islands and the 1,000 islets surrounding them have so far had no cases of coronavirus.


Micronesia, a federal state that occupies part of the Caroline Islands archipelago off the Philippines, is also part of these end-of-the-world territories that have so far escaped the coronavirus.

 The same is true of the Republic of Nauru, a slightly larger island-state than Monaco, lost somewhere in the Pacific Ocean.  With 160 tourists a year, it is one of the least visited places in the world.  The island banned travelers from China, South Korea, Italy and then Iran, however, and suspended flights from Fiji, Kiribati and Marshall Islands.


 Further west, between the Philippines and Indonesia, the Palau Islands, in the heart of the Pacific Ocean, have also benefited from their geographical isolation.  Despite coronavirus contamination in late northern Mariana Islands in the east, the government has not reported any cases of COVID-19.  Instead, this small country is facing significant supply shortages.  Prior to the pandemic, United Airlines had six flights a week between Guam and Palau.  Now there is only one flight a week.

 The Marshall Islands, made up of volcanoes and coral atolls and populated by only 75,000 inhabitants, have also remained untouched by the coronavirus.


 No cases have been reported in the island republic of Kiribati, with its 33 atolls, located between Polynesia and Micronesia.

All of these countries are spread across the Pacific Ocean, sometimes thousands of miles from a large city.  This geographical isolation, which does not usually bring them benefits, has now proven to be a lifeline, especially as there are countries that usually do not have very strong health systems.  There are small and fragile populations, which do not have, for example, artificial ventilation devices.  If an epidemic broke out, their population could be decimated.


 Two "free" coronavirus countries should be viewed with reluctance


 There are two other countries that, so far, have not declared any case of contamination with the new coronavirus: North Korea and Turkmenistan.  In both cases, the information must be viewed with reluctance, because it is governed by authoritarian regimes, too reluctant to communicate, especially when it comes to recognizing an epidemic.


 In fact, North Korea placed its military forces in isolation for 30 days, according to the head of the American troops stationed in South Korea.


 In Turkmenistan, you are not even allowed to talk about coronavirus.  The state media remains silent and the term does not appear in medical leaflets distributed in schools, hospitals and workplaces, according to Chroniques du Turkménistan, one of the few independent sources of information whose website is blocked in Turkmenistan but is hosted by the organization  Reporters Without Borders.

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coronavirus-vaccines-top-10-facts-that-you-need-to-know-before-taking-the-shot

The COVID-19 vaccine will be a critical tool that, combined with effective testing and existing preventive measures, will help bring the pandemic under control. Experts around the world are working hard to accelerate the development and production of a safe and effective vaccine. Bemorepanda answers some important questions aboutthe vaccine.


UNICEF is committed to delivering COVID-19 vaccines to 92 countries through the COVAX Mechanism, a unique initiative to produce and centrally procure COVID-19 vaccines. It works with governments and manufacturers to make vaccines available to both wealthy and low-income countries. As part of the global distribution, doses of vaccines have been reserved for the Republic of Tajikistan, which will be delivered to the country in the near future. The first batch of vaccines will contain 732 thousand doses of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. Priority populations to be vaccinated first include health and social workers, citizens over 50 and people with chronic noncommunicable diseases.


At the same time, the threat to children from COVID-19 is enormous, and it goes far beyond the immediate physical consequences of the disease. Continued or reintroduced isolation measures seriously affect children's access to basic health services. As a result, declining coverage of routine health services and an impending recession threaten the health and future of an entire generation of children. Below are answers to some of the most common questions parents may have about a potential COVID-19 vaccine.


1. What types of COVID-19 vaccines are being developed? How will they proceed?

Scientists are developing many potential COVID-19 vaccines, all designed to teach the body's immune system to safely recognize and block the virus that causes COVID-19. The different types of vaccines include:


Inactivated or attenuated viral vaccines that use a type of virus that does not cause disease but still elicits an immune response

Protein vaccines, which are a protein or protein fragment of COVID-19 that safely induce an immune response


Viral vector vaccines that use a virus designed so that it cannot cause disease, but produces COVID-19 proteins for a safe viral response

RNA and DNA vaccines, a novel approach that provides "instructions" for cells to create a protein that safely induces an immune response


2. What benefit will getting the COVID-19 vaccine bring?

COVID-19 is easily transmitted and can lead to serious illness and death, even for young and healthy people.


COVID-19 vaccines will be approved for use in the Republic of Tajikistan only if large, rigorous and rigorous scientific research shows they can safely reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection.


Scientists are investigating whether people who receive the COVID-19 vaccine will be less likely to transmit the COVID-19 virus to others. If this is the case, then vaccination can be a powerful way not only to protect yourself, but society as a whole.


3. How do we know if COVID-19 vaccines are safe?

There are many stringent safeguards that can help keep COVID-19 vaccines safe. Like all vaccines, COVID-19 vaccines must go through a rigorous multi-step testing process, including research involving tens of thousands of people. These trials, which involve people at high risk of contracting COVID-19, are specifically designed to look for any common side effects or other safety concerns.


Once the results of clinical trials become available, a number of steps will need to be taken, including an efficacy and safety review to obtain regulatory approvals and public health policy before a vaccine can be introduced. Once the COVID-19 vaccine is introduced, it will be closely monitored at all times for any unexpected side effects.


4. Will COVID-19 vaccines provide long-term protection?

Initial results from some vaccine trials have shown very encouraging results. Research is ongoing to obtain more information on how long these vaccines will provide protection. However, it is encouraging that the available evidence suggests that most people who recover from COVID-19 develop an immune response that provides at least some protection against reinfection - although we are still studying how strong this protection is and for how long. she will last.


It is also not clear how many doses of COVID-19 vaccine will be needed. Early data from clinical trials indicate that some vaccines will require two doses.


5. Will vaccinations against other diseases help protect me from COVID-19?

There is currently no evidence that vaccines for other diseases will protect against COVID-19. However, scientists are studying whether some of them - such as the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, used to prevent tuberculosis - will also be effective at protecting against COVID-19 or not. For now, however, no other vaccine is recommended to protect against COVID-19.


6. How quickly can COVID-19 vaccines cope with the pandemic?

We do not know how quickly COVID-19 vaccines could have tackled the pandemic. This will depend on many factors, such as the level of effectiveness of the vaccines, how quickly they are approved and manufactured, how many people get vaccinated, and continued compliance with measures such as physical distancing, hand washing and the use of masks.


7. When will COVID-19 vaccines be ready for distribution?

The Government of the Republic of Tajikistan is currently working to obtain the most suitable and safe vaccines against COVID-19 and will keep the public informed of any further changes.


Many potential COVID-19 vaccines are currently being studied to determine if they are safe and effective. Large studies of some of these vaccines have shown promising preliminary results and it is likely that additional studies will be announced soon.


Once a vaccine has proven to be safe and effective, it must be approved by the national regulatory authority / ministry of health before it can be introduced in a country.


8. Will there be enough COVID-19 vaccines for everyone? If not, who gets them first?

Initially, the supply of vaccines against COVID-19 to the country will be limited, that is, the vaccination process will be carried out in stages, taking into account high-risk groups. In accordance with the plan of the Government of the Republic of Tajikistan on the introduction of vaccines, the initial target groups will include:


Frontline healthcare workers (doctors, nurses, paramedics) - It is important to vaccinate frontline healthcare workers first, not only to protect them from disease, but so that they can continue to serve the masses and continue to fight the pandemic.


Elderly people aged 60 and over who are in a group with a high incidence rate.

People with concomitant diseases aged 20 and older (HIV, diabetes, tuberculosis, hypertension, chronic respiratory diseases, coronary heart disease, cancer).


Once enough doses have been received, the government will call for vaccination of all those who are eligible. In the short term, it is important that everyone - including those who are vaccinated - continue to follow all available measures to help stop the spread of COVID-19, such as physical distancing, use of masks, and hand washing with soap and water.


9. If I receive the COVID-19 vaccine, will I need to take other precautions such as physical distancing?

Yes. For now, we recommend that everyone - including those who have been vaccinated - continue to follow all available measures to help stop the spread of COVID-19, such as physical distancing, frequent hand washing with soap and the use of masks. Adhering to all of these measures in combination will provide the best possible protection against infection and spread of COVID-19. In the future, as more people are vaccinated, and as we learn more about the "real world" protection offered by COVID-19 vaccines, this recommendation may change.


10. How can I learn more about COVID-19 vaccines?


In order to make an informed choice and keep abreast of the latest developments, everyone must rely on reliable and authoritative sources of information, such as medical institutions and government health authorities. (Ministry of Health, RCIP, state television).


Ignore rumors and misinformation spread on various social networks and other unreliable sources.


The Government of Tajikistan is working with other stakeholders to obtain the most appropriate vaccines for COVID-19 and will keep you informed of any further developments.

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the-worlds-longest-commercial-flight-was-caused-by-coronavirus

The coronavirus spreads and continuously affects everyone, no matter where, on plane or ground. The virus resulted a new record for the world's longest commercial flight in distance, after an Air Tahiti Nui plane was forced to fly from French Polynesia to France in an epic, nonstop, 16-hour trip across 9,765-miles.

 

On March 14, Air Tahiti Nui flight TN064 from Tahiti to Paris became the longest recorded scheduled passenger flight by distance, The Independent reports. It took it flight from Papeete at 3 a.m., on the local time, on Saturday and touched the ground at Charles De Gaulle airport in Paris at 6:30 a.m. local time on Sunday, according to the New York Post.

Though the flight there is a stop in Los Angeles to pick up passengers and refuel, but not this time, due to imposed bans, it was prohibited for the planes that have at the board foreign nations that have been to Europe, to enter the U.S. 

 

From start to finish, the Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner reportedly spent about 15 hours and 45 minutes flying.

Though the Saturday flight happend because of the current travel ban, it beaten the distance record for a 9,534-mile passenger flight between Singapore and Newark, established by Singapore Airlines.

 

What are the top 10 longest flights?

 

  • Singapore Airlines: Newark (EWR) to Singapore (SIN): 9,521 miles; 18 hours, 45 minutes
  • Qatar Airways: Auckland (AKL) to Doha (DOH): 9,032 miles; 17 hours, 40 minutes
  • Qantas: Perth (PER) to London Heathrow (LHR): 9,010 miles; 17 hours, 20 minutes
  • Emirates: Auckland (AKL) to Dubai (DXB): 8,824 miles; 17 hours, 20 minutes
  • United Airlines (until October 27) and Singapore Airlines (starting November 2): Los Angeles (LAX) to Singapore (SIN): 8,770 miles; 17 hours, 15-50 minutes
  • United Airlines: Houston (IAH) to Sydney (SYD): 8,596 miles; 17 hours, 20 minutes
  • Qantas: Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) to Sydney (SYD): 8,578 miles; 17 hours, 15 minutes
  • United Airlines and Singapore Airlines: San Francisco (SFO) to Singapore (SIN): 8,446 miles; 16 hours, 35-40 minutes
  • Delta Air Lines: Johannesburg (JNB) to Atlanta (ATL): 8,439 miles; 16 hours, 27 minutes
  • Etihad: Abu Dhabi (AUH) to Los Angeles (LAX): 8,390 miles; 16 hours, 30 minutes
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these-are-the-countries-where-the-restaurants-are-still-open-and-you-can-live-your-old-life-during-the-coronavirus-lockdown

There are currently over 6 billion people living on lockdown, over 71,950 confirmed cases of coronavirus infection, 33,633 confirmed deaths and out those infected, around 5% or 26,737 are either in serious or critical condition.

 

While those numbers are already a serious wakeup for local governments, some countries are saying there is no need to panic.

 

Take Belarus as an example. The president, Alexander Lukashenko refuses to cancel anything and says vodka and saunas will cure any COVID-19 symptoms. Very few measures have been enforced to curb coronavirus in Belarus and instead, people are being urged to drink vodka and go to saunas. On top of that, all the sporting events are taking place as usual and this picture tells everything about the mood on the ground.

 

 

The football organizers have said they do not intend to postpone any matches or to cancel the season. President Alexander Lukashenko took part in an ice hockey match last week - declaring that sport "is the best anti-virus remedy".

 

Another country, Sweden, is the only EU country that has not yet introduced strict quarantine measures. Although the Prime Minister of the Scandinavian kingdom, Stephen Leuven, urged citizen to mentally prepare for an increase in the number of cases of COVID-19, the Swedish authorities are in no hurry to limit public life.

 

According to Spiegel Online, the cafes and restaurants of Stockholm are packed to capacity - perhaps now visitors have been obliged to sit at their tables and not crowd around the bar. More recently, mass gatherings of people within 500 people were allowed in the country, which many theaters and concert halls used to sell tickets for 499 spectators.

 

 

The chief epidemiologist in Sweden, Anders Tegnell, who heads the public health agency, responsible for these decisions, continues to insist that "the population should be ill with the virus." At the same time, his British and Dutch colleagues still refused this approach. According to Johns Hopkins University, already 3069 patients with coronavirus have been identified in Sweden, 105 patients have died. Now, 500 intensive care beds have been deployed throughout the country, although experts admit that this is at least three times less than might be needed in a critical situation.

 

Another country, Brazil, called the pandemic a momentary, minor problem and saying strong measures to contain it are unnecessary. The Brazilian Presidentm Jair Bolsonaro told reporters that he feels Brazilians’ natural immunity will protect the nation.

 

“The Brazilian needs to be studied. He doesn’t catch anything. You see a guy jumping into sewage, diving in, right? Nothing happens to him. I think a lot of people were already infected in Brazil, weeks or months ago, and they already have the antibodies that help it not proliferate,” Bolsonaro said. “I’m hopeful that’s really a reality.”

 

The number of COVID-19 cases approach 4,000, deaths top 100. And while he believe that  the virus will be vanquished by a cocktail of drugs and Brazil’s tropical climate, analysts say a more calculated political gamble may underlie his increasingly defiant position.

 

In Singapore, tourism receipts rose to S$27.1 billion (US$19 billion) in 2019 based on preliminary estimates, from S$26.9 billion the year before. Even though tourist arriving in Singapore must be placed in quarantine for 14 days, all the restaurants, pubs, gym, hotel are open. Singapore, as with many other countries that did not took a more drastic approach during the epidemic and people are now living their daily life as other countries once did.

 

 

No one knows which approach will work better, as we haven’t seen anything like this before so only time will tell. Bemorepanda has published a research by the Imperial College London (UK) with three different scenarios of the coronavirus epidemic here

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