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15 unique photofacts about everything in the world that you should learn to broaden your horizons

2 years ago
15-unique-photofacts-about-everything-in-the-world-that-you-should-learn-to-broaden-your-horizons

Sometimes you can learn a lot of useful things from the Internet by simply leafing through pictures.  In this post Bemorepanda collected different facts about everything that will help broaden our horizons, as well as distract for a couple of minutes from the routine. 


 1. In 2016, a Chinese businessman Xiong Shuihua demolished all the houses in his native village and built villas in their place.  

2. You would be confused to see such a door in your entrance for the first time.  This is just a drawing with an optical illusion. 

3. The Varani people live in Ecuador.  After lengthy litigation, they won a case against an oil company claiming their land.  In the photo, members of the Amazon tribe in the courtroom.

4. In 2015, Ford installed wide-angle front and rear 1-megapixel cameras on its cars that allow "seeing from around the corner."  The problem of "blind" zones has been solved.

5. Animal rights advocates have figured out how to protect elephants from poachers: they painted the animal tusks with pink paint, which is marked with banknotes in banks.  It does not harm the animal, but it is impossible to wash it off.  Buyers do not need such tusks. 

6. Does it look edible?  In fact, in the photo there is not grapes, but a mineral called "grape chalcedony".

7. This is the cross sea.  It looks like this because of wave systems moving at different angles. 

8. This is a tree called Jabuticaba (or Brazilian grape tree).  Its fruits grow directly from the bark. 

9. The guy took off the lightning for 2 hours and then combined all the frames in one.

10. City in Peru around the oasis in Huacachina.

11. In the Congaree National Park, the water in the lake turns different colors at a certain temperature.

12. Blacks couples born white baby.  No, the DNA test confirmed that the spouses are the biological parents of the baby.  Perhaps these are white dormant genes or mutating albinism.

13. Scientists have tracked eagle movements using GPS for 20 years.  Here are his flights.

14. Trace after a needle prick on the skin, taken with a microscope.

15. This is how entrants of the GITIS acting faculty are evaluated in the era of coronavirus.

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50-facts-distributed-by-weird-facts-that-will-surely-teach-you-new-things

Each new year represents a new beginning. Around the night between the years, we think about what we want the new year to bring, we make wishes, we make plans and we respect different superstitions in order to have luck in the beginning year. It is as common as it is convenient to believe that the luck of the new year is primarily due to fate, and thus we tend to minimize our own responsibility and the importance of our contribution to our own well-being.


But what if, at the turn of the year, we made a list of things we want to learn next year? Maybe we want to learn a foreign language, maybe we want to try a new sport, maybe we want to learn a new skill, use a new device, get a driver's license or maybe we want to learn to paint. We all have such desires, but we seldom fulfill them.


Bemorepanda has collected 50 interesting facts with which you can start the new year by learning new things. In 2022 we must give priority to knowledge and well-being.


1.Learning law for humanity


2.Equal rights


3.Single dad


4.Dolly Parton


Learning is necessary up to a point. When we are little, we always learn things about the reality around us that help us survive and adapt. Then we go to school, where we are forced to learn various subjects, some of which we like, some less. Then we go to college, where we specialize in one field. We go to work, where we learn to do our job. After a while, however, learning is no longer compulsory, it becomes optional. Nothing presses us anymore, the only motivation is given by our desire to know things. And this is the moment when the excuses appear: I don't feel like it now, I want to relax, I've learned enough, I'm too old to learn anymore, etc.


These excuses have long-term negative consequences. The brain, like any other muscle, atrophies in the absence of exercise. For this reason, thinking becomes rigid and we tend to suffer from functional fixation. In other words, we are used to doing things the same way all the time, we feel uncomfortable when we are faced with a new situation and we lose the ability to think "outside the box" and find creative solutions to the problems we face. The more time we spend learning nothing new, the more useless it seems to us to try.


5.The 9 Nanas


6.Money doesn’t grow on tree


7.Bury Bentley


8.Syndrome K


First of all, if our brain is always trained to learn new things, it will be easier for us to learn skills, because we will be able to relate them to what we already know. And we will know more and more. This will allow us to deal with more and more situations. Although we may not see the immediate benefit of learning a certain thing in the long run, we will certainly feel the benefits.


By always learning, we keep our spirit young and will process information very quickly, because we will have a complex system in which to integrate it. Last but not least, we will have an increased sense of self-efficacy, which will help us to feel good about ourselves, to know what we are capable of and to be confident that we can succeed in what we set out to do.


9.Dale Schroeder


10.Dream come true


11.Breakfast with dads


12.Steve Buscemi


13.Surgeons


14.No charges


15.Joyce Diane


16.Doodlebug


17.Alabama husband


18.Kansas


19.Mr. Rogers


20.Sleeping family


21.Blood donations


22.Anais Bordier


23.Turtles


24.Billy Ray


25.Boston College


26.Billy Joel


27.Marshall


28.Preparing dinner


29.Don’t care


30.Anthony Borges


31.Elmer Alvarez


32.Bill Morgan


33.Nicole Graham


34.Super dad


35.Matt LeBlanc


36.Koko


37.Hedy Lamarr


38.Enoteca Maria


39.Russian couple


40.Mozart


41.Playboy


42.Kidney transplant


43.Gordon Ramsey


44.Sylvester Stallone


45.Siberian girl


46.SWAT


47.Prison inmates


48.Colonel Sander


49.Bob Ross


50.Luna




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top-100-interesting-things-from-wtf-facts-the-most-popular-facts-page-on-twitter

The concept of fact-checking came to new media from traditional journalism. More precisely, from the principles of the editorial office: an editorial filter is a necessary condition in the technology of a journalist's work. This technology is due to ethical principles: independence, objectivity, impartiality, accuracy. Due to the observance of these principles, the trust of the audience appears and the reputation of the publication is formed.

 

A fact is an event supported by reliable evidence. Different people may have different views on the same event, but you can't argue with the facts. That is why the fact should not only be established, but verified, rechecked and “cast in granite”.

 

Therefore, distortion of facts is a crime against objectivity and accuracy. Worse if it is a deliberate crime against independence and impartiality. It’s very bad when it’s a deliberate manipulative construct.

 

In modern digital communications, the concept of "factoid" is becoming more and more relevant. This is an initially non-existent fact, which, being published in the media, receives a lively reaction and assessment. And they, in turn, affect the picture of the world and the actions of people. The truth is not that important, in fact, if the effect is real.

 

Bemorepanda has prepared some interesting facts about everything in the world. WTF Facts is one of the most famous Twitter pages, here you will find a lot of interesting facts that will amaze you. Bemorepanda is at your disposal so that every day the most interesting things reach the screens of your devices.

 

Top 100 interesting things from WTF Facts

 

1.A speeding ticket in Finland

 

2.Free people in Mexico

 

3.Winning lottery

 

In Russia there is a famous story. This is very reminiscent of the episode of the cartoon about kolobok investigators, where the evil animal dealer Karbofos buys a porcelain elephant from a junk dealer, gets a certificate on him, breaks the now unnecessary trinket and says: "The elephant is bad, the certificate is good!" After that, according to this certificate, he leads a live elephant across the border. The rustic border guard stupidly looks at the certificate, correlates what is written in it with what he sees, and lets the animal across the border.

 

Likewise, people for the most part, following automatisms and stereotypes, trust the form, not critically perceiving the essence. There is a help - come through. On TV they said - it means the truth. Journalists won't lie! Even if the host of a popular talk show is in the frame, and not a journalist in the full sense of the word.

 

In the same way, various phenomena and events are actualized and legalized. Unconsciously or prudently, they are embedded in the form of "confirmed" facts in the information picture, as a result, distorting the entire canvas. This technique is actively used by propagandists, cyber fighters, network trolls and other manipulators of all stripes.

 

4.Support dogs in Zoo

 

5.Golden Arm

 

The fact checker's main weapon is doubt. Professional mistrust, reality check. Here, the logic and toolkit of fact-checking largely coincides with the methodologies and technologies of scientific work. Moreover, a course on source study specialized for historians can raise the level of quality of a journalist's work with sources by an order of magnitude. Be it living interlocutors or material carriers of natural and artificial origin.

 

Newspaper ducks, gossip, rumors, speculation, factoids, manipulations, irresponsible and malicious fakes, technical errors and typos - all this scum is opposed by fact-checking. This is a powerful weapon, which, alas, is often not well known to those who work in the field of mass communications.

 

6.Eminem and Elton John

 

7.Hotel in Japan

 

8.White Yak

 

9.Happiness expert

 

10.Twins

 

11.Forgiving people

 

12.George Carlin

 

13.Dogs and human

 

14.Invisibility of Poverty

 

15.Place in Iceland

 

16.Prison sentence

 

17.Royal holy water

 

18.Norway university

 

19.Disliking a person

 

20.Swear a lot

 

21.Marijuana

 

22.Divorce in Germany

 

23.Angry Gorilla

 

24.Segregated library

 

25.Squid Game

 

26.Overestimate women

 

27.Japan 

 

28.Headbutting

 

29.Stephen King

 

30.Hitler

 

31.Camel beauty contest

 

32.Truck carrying money

 

33.Arm up for 45 years

 

34.Public toilets in Japan

 

35.Dogs are excellent judges

 

36.Terrible haircut

 

37.Bras are useless

 

38.Listening to music

 

39.Oldest person

 

40.The oldest living animal on planet

 

41.Macron and his wife

 

42.Performing naked

 

43.Fake death

 

44.Bees

 

45.Married her dog

 

46.Lies in english

 

47.Walt Disney was fired

 

48.Mike Tyson

 

49.1983 cost of living

 

50.Sex and beard

 

51.Humans like bacon

 

52.Roman couple

 

53.Jim Carry

 

54.Obi

 

55.Mad persons

 

56.Baby face

 

57.Spotify

 

58.Anglerfish

 

59.Iceland is a safe country

 

60.Giant tarantulas

 

61.While sleeping

 

62.Pussy Village in France

 

63.Jack Nichols

 

64.Homeless man

 

65.Leather coats are banned in North Korea

 

66.The longest road in the world to walk is from Cape Town (South Africa) to Magadan (Russia). It's 22,387 km, and it takes around 4,500 hours to travel.

 

67.Brutus the grizzly bear

 

68.Japanese sterotypes

 

69.Morgan Freeman

 

70.Realistic art

 

71.Causes of death in London

 

72.House for ex-wife

 

73.A cow escaped and was found at the waterpark

 

74.Lawyer from Kenya

 

75.Public toilets in Tanzania

 

76.Town in India where is no religion

 

77.The Queen’s favourite meal

 

78.4 years difference

 

79.Gary Webb

 

80.Bob Marley

 

81.High intelligence

 

82.Napoleon

 

83.Football team killed by a lighting struck

 

84.Brothel in Vienna and Covid vaccination

 

85.Albert Camus

 

86.Mercury and the sun

 

87.Hotel in Finland

 

88.Residential district in Dubai

 

89.9 babies

 

90.All I want for Christmas is you

 

91.Elon Musk and world hunger

 

92.Largest hotel in Saudi Arabia

 

93.50 cent

 

94.Elon Musk at college

 

95.Millionaire in China

 

96.Mike Tyson and marijuana

 

97.The largest clear cut diamond

 

98.Elon Musk worth

 

99.Nikola Tesla

 

100.Capsule Hotel in Japan

 

 

 

 

 

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50-world-snooker-championship-interesting-and-fun-facts-in-2022-to-mark-the-beging-of-the-most-prestigious-and-wealthiest-tournament

The World Snooker Championship is the premier professional ranking tournament in snooker.


Since the 1973/74 season, it has been included in the list of rating competitions. The championship is currently held at the Crucible Theater in Sheffield, England. This tournament is the most important in terms of prestige, ranking points and prize money, and takes place annually at the end of the season.


The format of the World Cup in the early stages of its development (1920-1960) was unstable and changed almost every time. Basically, snooker players played long, sometimes multi-day matches. The peak of such "marathon" draws came in the 1950s, when the finals were played to at least 50 wins. 1952 was a record year for this indicator - then Horace Lindrum and Clark McConaughey played a match of 143 frames.


Lindrum won that final with a score of 94:49 (for comparison, championship finals are now played up to 18 wins). However, in the 1970s, the WPBSA (snooker's new governing body) was forced to reduce the number of frames to win. This happened for a simple reason: snooker matches began to be broadcast on television, and the broadcast time was limited.


So, since 1980, the maximum possible number of final games has been reduced to 35. By the way, around the same time, thanks to the arrival of new professional players, the tournament bracket expanded: now the matches of the main part of the championship began with the 1/16 finals. The rest of the matches were played according to a well-established system, which for almost 30 years has undergone minimal changes: 1/16 finals - matches up to 10 wins, 1/8 finals - up to 13 wins, 1/4 finals - up to 13 wins and semi-finals - up to 17 victories (up to 16 until 1997). Seeding of playersTraditionally, the first match of each new world championship is opened by the current winner.


Bemorepanda collected some interesting facts.


PREVIEW: 2021 World Snooker Championship - Cluster of Reds Snooker Blog


1. The fastest high of 147 in the history of snooker was made at the 1997 World Cup by Ronnie O'Sullivan. It was unimaginably fast - only five minutes and 20 seconds, Ronini then played against Mick Price.


2. Chinese promoters have built a replica of the Crucible (the arena where the World Cup takes place) in Beijing as a first step in getting the World Cup to be hosted in China.


3. It must be said that the Chinese Crucible is completely identical to the English arena in Sheffield, and may be more than a convincing argument in the future. Sheffield has a contract to host the World Cup until 2017, and World Snooker chairman Barry Hearn said he just wants the tournament to stay in that city.


4. In total, 10 maximums were made during the televised stages of the World Championships. And three each - on account of Stephen Hendry and Ronnie O'Sullivan. Also among those who made 147 at this stage are Cliff Thorburn, Jimmy White, Ali Carter and Mark Williams. Moreover, Hendry made his last maximum in the championship in 2012, after which he retired.


5. Scottish players have won 12 of the last 25 world titles, including Hendry's seven (1990-92-93-94-95-96-99), John Higgins' four (1998-2007-2009-2011) and one in Graham Dott (2006).


________________________________________________________

Accordingly, when seeding for a tournament, he receives the first number, regardless of what place he occupies in the official or preliminary ranking. The second number is usually given to the player ranked first in the official rankings. The distribution of seeding among the remaining 14 snooker players from the Top 16 is also made in accordance with the official ranking. For example, at the 2010 tournament, the first seed was the winner of the 2009 championship (that is, the previous champion) John Higgins (although at that time he was only the 4th number in the rating).


The second was Ronnie O'Sullivan, who occupied the 1st at that time in the rating. The third seed went to Stephen Maguire (ranked 2). It should also be noted that the distribution of "unseeded" (qualified) players to the first round of the final stage (1/16 finals) is made by random draw, and their official rating does not play no role. For example, in the 1/16th of the same tournament in 2010, Higgins, being the first seed, played with the 17th seed, and the 2nd seed (O'Sullivan) played with the 27th number.


Prize money at the World Snooker Championship appeared from the very first year of its holding and amounted to 6 pounds and 10 shillings. By 1946, the prize money had increased to £1,000 for the victory and the final, and although translated into the current exchange rate, this amount increases several times, the money was clearly not enough all this time.


The situation changed for the better in the early 1970s, when snooker tournaments began to be shown on television, and well-known sponsors (mostly advertising cigarettes and alcoholic beverages) became interested in the game. did not increase, but the sponsors themselves changed three times over the next 10 years.


The arrival of the cigarette brand Embassy in 1976 was crucial for the tournament, and it began to actively increase the prize fund. At the first Embassy-sponsored World Championship, the prize money totaled ? 15,300; the champion guaranteed himself £6,000. But already by 1995, the fund was set at 578,250, and in the 2003 championship, a record for prize money, only the winner received ? 270 thousand. The general fund of that superiority has made 1 378 920 pounds.

________________________________________________________



6. Derbyshire player Joe Davis became the first world champion in 1927 and won 15 titles in a row, ie. all the World Cups in which he participated. He won his last world title in 1946 and ended his career undefeated.


7. Only two players participated in the 1931 World Cup. Tom Dennis, in whose pub this tournament was organized, lost 25:21 to Joe Davis.


8. Fred Davis, who won eight world titles, reached the 1978 semi-finals at the age of 64. Joe Davis, his brother, collapsed watching the semi-finals and died two months later.


9. The youngest world champion was Stephen Hendriev in 1990. The Scot was only 21 years old when he defeated Jimmy White 18:12.


10. Hendry was the youngest player to make his World Cup debut in 1986 until his record was broken by Belgian Luca Brecel in 2012 when she made her first World Cup appearance at 17 years and 45 days old.


11. In 2005, Sean Murphystal was the first player to qualify and eventually win the world title. Judd Trump almost repeated his achievement in 2011, but failed, losing in the final to John Higgins.


12. The TV audience for the World Cup final, in which Dennis Taylor defeated Steve Davis by winning in the last black, was 18.5 million in the UK alone. TV time, both are still unbeaten. However, when compared with China, in particular, with the audience of Ding Junhui's matches, these numbers are simply meager.


________________________________________________________

In addition, since the early 1990s, players who made the maximum break have also received a solid reward in the amount of 157,000 to 167,000 pounds (147,000 for the maximum itself and up to 20,000 for the highest break of the tournament); in 2011, this bonus was canceled, and since 2012, a “rolling jackpot” system has been introduced. Geography of the championship and its participants Over 83 years (with short breaks) of its history, the World Championship has visited 13 cities and 3 countries of the world (Great Britain (England), South African Republic, Australia).


Among the most successful players, both before and now, the British dominate, but recently participants from traditionally “non-nooker” countries have begun to appear. Since the beginning of the 90s, representatives of England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Ireland, China, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, the Netherlands, Iceland, Norway, Finland, Thailand, Pakistan, Malta and Belgium have played in the final stage of the tournament.Among The most successful non-British snooker players who have not yet finished their careers include Neil Robertson from Australia (winner of the 2010 World Cup), Stefan Mazrotsis from the Netherlands, who made it to the 16 finals at the 1997 World Cup, Ding Junhui and Liang Wenbo from China and Tony Drago from Malta.


Recently, information has periodically appeared that the World Cup could be moved to China, but not earlier than the current contract with the Sheffield Crucible ends. The desire to move the tournament to China is due to the high popularity of snooker in this country, as well as the possibility of attracting new major sponsors.


Ranking Points Ranking points at the World Championships have always been and remain the most valuable of all snooker tournaments. Although until 2005 the winners of the championship received 8,000 points, this was enough for them to sharply improve or strengthen their position in the world rankings, since the points in most other competitions were half as much. Often, it was the victory in the championship that brought snooker players with an insufficiently high rating the first place at the end of the season. For example, in 1990, Stephen Hendry became the first thanks to the victory in the championship, although before that he was far behind Steve Davis.

________________________________________________________



13. Jimmy White, Walter Donaldson and Fred Davis each lost six finals - and this is an anti-record. True, White, unlike Donaldson and Davis, has never been a world champion.


14. In the entire history of the World Championships, there was only one devastating match with a dry score. It happened in the first round in 1992, when 62-year-old Australian Eddie Charlton suffered a crushing 10-0 loss to then-champion John Parrott.


15. The maximum capacity of the Crucible is 980 spectators.


16. Ronnie O'Sullivan turned professional as Under-21 World Snooker Champion. Of the seventy-two of his first matches as a professional, Ronnie won seventy.


17. Alex Higgins was the first player to play 15 reds over blacks in the World Championship, although he never quite got to the 147-point streak.


18. At the age of 16 years and 11 months, Jimmy White became the youngest amateur world champion (this happened in 1970).


________________________________________________________

Points are distributed among the players to varying degrees depending on their position in the official rankings and the tournament result. For example, players with a lower rating (outside the Top 16, i.e. qualified) receive more points for losing in the round of 32 strongest (1/16 finals) than participants in the Top 16 with the same result. the history of the event has only been played a few times over the course of more than one year. In general, the dates for this tournament have been set for quite a long time - this is approximately mid-April - early May.


For example, the 2008 World Cup was held daily from April 19 to May 5. Qualifying matches For a long time (until 2010), the qualification of the main tour players in the main part of the tournament was usually carried out in two stages. The first was played by snooker players, who occupy the lowest positions in the official ranking. The first stage was usually held in winter, in early to mid-January. The second qualifying stage was held in the spring, two or three months before the start of the championship[29]. In 2010, it was decided to bring the two qualifying stages closer together in calendar terms and to be held, with short breaks, between February 26 and March 9.


Starting from 2011, all qualifying rounds were set to be held daily, one after another, with the only one-day break left to restore the gaming tables. Recently, the so-called pre-qualification, or qualification for players who are part of the WPBSA, but not playing in main tour. It, depending on the number of participants, can consist of several stages, and gives the opportunity for former professionals (or other WPBSA members who are not playing on the tour) to get into the main qualification and fight further for getting into the final stage. Previously, when significantly more snooker players were playing on the main tour, there was a pre-qualification for regular amateur players instead.

________________________________________________________



19. At the 1982 World Championship, defending Steve Davis was beaten 10–1 by Tony Knowles in the first round.


20. The first official maximum series was made by Joe Davis in 1955.


21. Steve Davis made the first "television" 147-point streak in 1982 at the Lada Classic tournament.


22. Canadian snooker player Bill Verbeniuk was ordered by doctors to drink a pint (about half a liter) of lager (a kind of light beer) after each game, which sometimes amounted to up to 40 pints of lager per day. This huge man, who weighed about 128 kg, drank liters of beer before, during, and after matches to calm the trembling in his cue hand. This trembling was due to a hereditary nervous disorder.


23. Ronnie O'Sullivan made a record 30 century breaks in his first season in professional snooker.


24. Stephen Hendry won the Rothmans Grand Prix in 1987 at the age of 18, becoming the youngest player to win a ranking event.



25. Cliff Thorburn made the very first 147-point streak in World Snooker Championship history in 1983.


26. In the 1983–84 season, Steve Davis won his third world title in four years, becoming the first player to manage to defend his league title.


27. The three-minute game in the match between Tony Drago and Danny Fowler was the fastest ever in the history of rating tournaments.


28. Judd Trump is the youngest player to make a 147-point streak in official competition at the age of 14 years and 208 days.


29. The final session of K. Thorburn's game against T. Griffiths at the 1983 World Championship was a record long one. The session time was 6 hours 25 minutes, the match ended at 3:51 in the morning!


30. In the 1993 season (at age 17), Ronnie O'Sullivan became the youngest player to qualify for the World Cup.


31. Murt O'Donoghue was the first player to make a 147-point streak in 1934.


32. Dennis Taylor won his first Rothman's Grand Prix title in 1984 three weeks after his mother's death.



33. In the 1985 Dulux British Open final between Kirk Stevens and Silvino Francisco, a non-British player challenged for the title of winner of a ranking tournament for the first time.


34. In 1927, Joe Davis received £6.10 for winning the World Championship.

542 players entered the 1993 World Cup, while only two entered the 1931 World Cup.


35. John Spencer made his first 147-point streak in professional competition against Cliff Thorburn at the Holstein Classic in 1979.


36. In the 1992–93 season, Doug Mountjoy won a match in the Crucible before surgery to remove a malignant tumor.


37. The 1985 World Cup final between Steve Davis and Dennis Taylor was watched by 18.5 million viewers.


38. Snooker balls were originally made from ivory.


39. In 2005, at the age of 18 years and 1 day, Chinese snooker player Ding became the youngest winner of a professional tournament ("China Open").



40. Alex Higgins became world snooker champion on his first try (in 1972). He received £480 for the win (compared with Shaun Murphy's £250,000 in 2005).


41. John Virgo had to come to terms with a two-set loss after he was 30 minutes late for the final session of the 1979 Coral UK final.


42. In 1990, Stephen Hendry, at the age of 21, became the youngest ever world champion when he defeated Jimmy White 18–12.


43. Canadian Cliff Thorburn (1980 World Champion) and Irish Ken Dougherty (1997 World Champion) are the only two non-UK champions.


44. Joe Johnson in 1986 and Shaun Murphy in 2005 became world champions, while their chances of winning were estimated at one chance in one hundred and fifty.


45. Jimmy White has reached the finals of the World Championships six times, but never won. He came closest to a championship title in 1994 when he lost to Stephen Hendry 17–18.


46. Derbyshire native Joe Davies became snooker's first world champion in 1927 and won all 15 world championships he competed in. He won his last title in 1946, after which he did not take part in the world championships, but continued to play in other tournaments.



47. At the first World Championship in Birmingham, the prize fund was ... 6 pounds 10 sterling.


48. Only two players participated in the 1931 World Cup: Tom Dennis, in whose pub the tournament was held, lost 21-25 to Joe Davis.


49. Fred Davis, who won eight world titles, reached the semi-finals of the championship in 1978 at the age of 64. Unfortunately, his sibling Joe Davis suffered a seizure while watching the match and later passed away just a couple of months later.


50.18.5 million Britons watched the denouement at the decisive black in the 1985 World Cup final when Dennis Taylor defeated Steve Davis. At the same time, the television audience of Ding Junhui's matches in China, as a rule, regularly exceeds this figure by an order of magnitude.



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50-interesting-and-fun-facts-about-russia-that-you-probably-didnt-know

Russia is a country that impresses with its massive size and culture. At the same time, Russians are kind and nice people who are glad to welcome every guest. This country is associated with forests and mountains, clear lakes and endless rivers, diverse flora and fauna. It is here that people of different nationalities live, respecting the culture and customs of the locals. Next, we suggest reading more interesting and amazing facts about Russia and Russians. The country is made up of people, not the government. 



1. Russia is the largest country in the world, with an area of ​​more than 17 million km2, so its length from east to west covers 10 time zones at once. 


2. The Russian Federation includes 21 national republics, which occupy 21% of the territory of Russia. 


3. Throughout the world, Russia is considered a European country, but at the same time, 2/3 of its territory is in Asia. 


4. Russia is separated from the USA by only 4 km, which separates the Russian island of Ratmanov and the American island of Kruzenshtern. 


5. The area of ​​frosty Siberia is 9.7 million km2, which is as much as 9% of the land mass of planet Earth.



6. Forests occupy most of the Russian territory and make up as much as 60% of the area of ​​Russia. Russia is also rich in water resources, which include 3 million lakes and 2.5 million rivers. 


7. The lake in Russia, which is located on the territory of the Valdai National Park, is included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. It is said that the water in this lake is healing and holy. 


8. In Russia, Swan Lake is not only the name of the ballet, but also the place in the Altai Territory, where about 300 swans and 2000 ducks arrive for wintering in November. 


9. In Russia, mother nature is honored, therefore, 4% of the country's area is occupied by nature reserves. 


10. Russia is the only state in the whole world whose territory is washed by 12 seas at once. 



11. Russia is home to the largest active volcano in the world, Klyuchevskaya Sopka, which is 4.85 km high and has been erupting regularly for 7,000 years. 


12. The climate in Russia is very diverse, and if in Sochi in winter the usual air temperature is +5°C, then in the settlement of Yakutia it can reach -55°C at the same time. 


13. The record low air temperature was recorded in 1924 in the Russian city of Oymyakon, and it amounted to as much as -71 ° C. 


14. The first place in the world in gas and oil production, as well as in the export of aluminum, steel and nitrogen fertilizers, is awarded to the Russian Federation. 


15. The capital of Russia, Moscow, is one of the most densely populated cities in the world, with 11 million people living there, according to official figures. 



16. In terms of population, Russia ranks 7th in the world and has 145 million people, with Russians in Russia making up 75% of the population. 


17. Moscow is one of the richest and most expensive cities in the world, and the level of wages in this city differs from the level of wages in other Russian cities by 3, and occasionally 33 times. 


18. In Russia there is one amazing city - Suzdal, on an area of is 15 km2 10,000 people live, and which is amazing in that there are as many as 53 temples, majestic in their beauty and decoration.


19. The Russian city of Yekaterinburg in 2002, according to the UNESCO rating, was included in the list of 12 most ideal cities for living in the world. 


20. One of the oldest cities in the world where people still live in Russia is the Dagestan city of Derbent.


21. If you add together the territory of the Netherlands and Belgium, then their area will be equal to the area of ​​the Tambov region. 



22. The Russian Federation is considered the successor of the Roman Empire, because the double-headed eagle depicted on its coat of arms symbolizes the Byzantine idea of ​​harmonious interaction between the power of church and state. 


23. Russia is rich in its secrets. For example, there are more than 15 cities there that are hidden from everyone, because they are neither on maps, nor on road signs, but nowhere at all, and, of course, foreigners are strictly forbidden to enter there. 


24. The Moscow metro is the most punctual metro in the world, because the intervals between trains during rush hour are only 1.5 minutes. 


25. The deepest metro in the world is located in the cultural capital of the Russian Federation - St. Petersburg, and its depth is as much as 100 meters. 


26. The Russian metro was the safest place during the air raids of World War II, and 150 people were born there during the bombing.



27. St. Petersburg is not just called the cultural capital of Russia, it's just that in this city there are 2000 libraries, 45 art galleries, 221 museums, about 80 theaters and the same number of clubs and palaces of culture. 


28. Peterhof is one of the most amazing palace and park complexes in the world, because in addition to luxurious palaces, it has a huge number of fountains, of which there are 176 pieces, of which 40 fountains are truly gigantic. 


29. They say that Venice is a city of bridges, but no matter how, because there are three times as many bridges in St. Petersburg. 


30. Russia has the longest railway line - the Trans-Siberian Railway, connecting Moscow and Vladivostok. The length of this route is 9298 km, and during the trip it is possible to pass 8 time zones, 87 cities and 16 rivers. 



31. Russia also has the largest freshwater lake in the world - Baikal, with a volume of as much as 23 km3. To imagine its greatness, it is enough to think about the fact that the 12 largest rivers in the world have to flow for a whole year in order to fill Baikal. 


32. The most ancient, and therefore the most majestic mountains in the world are the Urals. For example, Mount Pencil, which is part of the Ural Mountains complex, arose more than 4 billion years ago. 


33. One of the strangest mountains in the world is the Russian mountain Magnetic, located under the city of Magnitogorsk, which is almost entirely made of iron. 


34. In Russia, there is the largest, densest and almost wild forest in the world - this is the Siberian taiga, half of which has not even been mastered by man yet. 


35. In the capital of the Russian Federation there is one fountain, which is part of the architectural group "Alexander and Natalie", from which it is not ordinary water that beats, but drinking water, which you can gladly quench your thirst on a hot summer day. 



36. Located on Borovitsky Hill, the Moscow Kremlin is the largest fortress in the world, preserved since the Middle Ages, and its area covers 27.5 hectares, and the length of the walls is 2235 m. 


37. The largest and oldest museum in the whole world is the Russian Hermitage Museum, which contains 3 million exhibits, and if someone wants to examine them all, devoting only one minute to each exhibit, this person will have to go to the museum, as if to work, for 25 years. 


38. The Hermitage is also famous for the fact that the staff of the museum includes not only people, but also the most ordinary cats who have their own passport with a photo and earn their Whiskas money by catching rodents in the museum, preventing them from spoiling the exhibits. 


39. In Russia, there is the largest library in Europe - this is the Public Library, which was founded in Moscow in 1862. 


40. In the small town of Kizhi there is a church resembling a work of art, which is interesting because not a single nail was spent on its construction.


 


41. In Russia, there is the world's largest university building - Moscow State University, whose height, together with an exquisite spire, is 240 meters. 


42. In Moscow, you can see the highest building in Europe - the Ostankino TV tower, whose height is 540 meters. 


43. The world's largest bell was cast in Russia by craftsmen Ivan Motorin and his son Mikhail. This is the Tsar Bell, which is 614 cm high and weighs 202 tons.


44. The oldest Christian temple is located on the territory of the Russian Federation - this is the Tkhaba-Erdy temple, built in the VIII-IX centuries, which is located in Ingushetia. 


45. Russia has one of the largest urban parks in the world - this is Izmailovsky Park, which was founded in 1931 and whose territory is now as much as 15.3 km2. 



46. ​​The largest botanical garden in Europe is again Russian. This is the botanical garden. Tsitsing, which was founded immediately after the end of the Great Patriotic War in 1945. 


47. The world's largest tram network is located in St. Petersburg and is as much as 690 km. 


48. The most record-breaking issue of a paper newspaper took place in May 1990, when 22 million copies of Komsomolskaya Pravda newspapers were published. 


49. The frame of the world-famous New York Statue of Liberty was smelted in one of the Russian cities - Yekaterinburg. 


50. Russia is a paradise for tourists with many beautiful and interesting tourist and sightseeing routes, among which the Golden and Silver Rings of Russia, as well as the Great Ural Ring, are considered the best.


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100-most-interesting-and-fun-facts-about-tokyo-that-will-change-your-mind-about-japan

Tokyo, the capital of distant and prosperous Japan, stuns tourists literally from the first moments, as soon as the traveler's footsteps on his land. Everything seems to be different here than in other cities: an incredibly complex layout of blocks, and intricate metro lines that are perceived as not connected to each other, and a solid jungle of city communications wires. During rush hours, people seem to merge into one river, and its flows fill the streets, underpasses, public transport. Here you need to always keep your eyes open, because it is very easy to get lost, getting completely different from where you hoped to be.


Tokyo is second in the world in terms of population density. The city of 37 million is not only the political, administrative and financial, but also the industrial and cultural center of the country. Located in the southeastern part of Japan's largest island of Honshu, this ultra-modern metropolis, where life does not stop day or night, is located on the Kanto Plain, in a cozy bay of Tokyo Bay. To truly feel its amazing atmosphere and get acquainted with at least half of the sights, one day or even a week is not enough - you need to live here for several months.


Huge and many-sided Tokyo, the capital of the only empire in the world, and even an island - Japan, cannot be described in a few words or limited to only a couple of epithets, even the most eloquent ones. And all because in this ancient city, modernity and ancient Japanese traditions harmoniously coexist, mutually penetrating each other. The Old City is worth mentioning separately. Having visited its numerous palaces, temples and shrines, it is as if you are plunging into the era of the shoguns, who for a long time were the sole rulers of the Land of the Rising Sun. Art lovers will quench their thirst for beauty in Tokyo's many museums.



1. Beneath Tokyo are five huge cylindrical shafts that will be filled with water in the event of a flood. This will prevent the destruction of the city.


2. There is an anime and manga in Japan called "Saint Young Men" in which Jesus and Buddha live in Tokyo as roommates. They rest on Earth and try to understand Japanese society.


3. When Tokyo officials went to congratulate the oldest man in the city on his 111th birthday in 2010, they found his remains on a bed. He had been dead for 30 years, and his family was taking away his pension, which was still accruing to him.


4. The Allied bombing of Tokyo killed more civilians than the atomic bombings of Nagasaki and Hiroshima combined.


5. During the Tokyo real estate bubble, the Imperial Palace (1.32 square miles) was valued more than all real estate in California.



6. Researchers in Tokyo have developed a mirror that changes a person's facial expression in real time. It gives a smile to the face. The application is intended for use in the bathrooms of the mall. The technology was adopted in the hope that happy shoppers would spend more.


7. The 2020 Olympic Games was held in Tokyo, Japan, as predicted in the 1982 Akira manga.


8. In 2013, a 39-story hotel in Tokyo literally "disappeared". It was demolished without the use of explosives or a special wrecking ball. All 39 floors were dismantled from the inside using a small crane, which gradually folded floor by floor.


9. You can pay a travel agency in Tokyo to send your plush toy on vacation without you.


10. One day, the Japanese government sent cherry tree seedlings to Washington as a gift. After the Second World War, cuttings from these cherry trees were sent back to Japan to restore the Tokyo collection, which was destroyed as a result of American bombing.



11. Tokyo Skytree is the tallest freestanding tower in the world. The height of the building is 634 meters. The tower's final height was chosen solely because of a play on words. The result is "Musashi": "mu" (in old Japanese means the number 6), "sa" (3) and "si" (4). This was the name of the historic district where modern Tokyo is located.


12. A Japanese scientist has created an exact copy of Tokyo. He used oatmeal to create nearby settlements, and bright light to simulate mountains, water sources and other natural features. When a scientist placed a living slime mold in the center of the mock-up, it created a network reminiscent of the Tokyo rail system as it tried to reach the treat (oatmeal).


13. Japan has almost twice as many 7-Elevens stores as the US. Only in Tokyo there are 2079 stores of this network.


14. There is a store in Tokyo called Whoopi Goldberg.



15. One of the Tokyo skyscrapers informs you with the help of colored lights whether to take an umbrella with you when you go outside.


16. In Tokyo, there is a building built in 1972, consisting of tiny 90-square-foot capsule apartments. If necessary, they can be replaced as Lego pieces.


17. There is a 12-story luxury stationery store in Tokyo. On the 12th floor they serve lettuce grown on the organic indoor farm located on the 11th floor of the same building.


18. Tokyo University is developing a tactile hologram. In other words, they create a hologram that can be touched and felt.


19. Tokyo has an anime-themed Butler cafe. According to the hostess, Japanese women “want to visit cafes where handsome male waiters will treat them like princesses.” This is the only cafe where only foreigners work.



20. 45 of the 51 busiest train stations in the world are in Japan. The busiest Shinjuku station, located in Tokyo, serves approximately 1.2 billion passengers a year.


21. At noon on September 1, 1923, a powerful earthquake occurred in Tokyo. Major fires broke out throughout the city because at the time of the earthquake, people were cooking dinner over an open fire. More than 100,000 people died.


22. Blue "anti-suicide" LED lights have been installed on all train platforms in Tokyo in an attempt to reduce the number of suicides committed here. It is believed that such lanterns have a calming effect. Studies have shown that blue-light stations have reduced suicide rates by 84%.


23. In 1923, a “fire tornado” swept through Tokyo and burned over 38,000 people.


24. Each Tokyo train station has its own unique theme songs.



25. The rock and roll culture of the 50s is still thriving in Tokyo.


26. Researchers at the University of Tokyo have created a robot arm that wins 100% of the time in a game of rock-paper-scissors. Using a high-speed camera, the robot recognizes within one millisecond the shape that the human hand is about to create, and then selects the winning combination.


27. A cafe has opened in Tokyo where visitors can hug hedgehogs.


28. On March 9-10, 1945, 300 B29 bombers dropped almost 500,000 cylinders of napalm and petroleum products on Tokyo, creating a 40-kilometer firestorm that killed over 100,000 people and maimed another million Japanese. It was the most destructive bombing in human history, including the atomic bombs of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.


29. Crows in Tokyo often steal steel wires to add to their nests. This often results in power outages when birds build nests on power lines.


30. Tokyo restaurants have more Michelin stars than Parisian establishments. In 2007, the editor of Michelin declared Tokyo to be the "Gastronomic Capital of the World".



31. Cat cafes are popular and quite common in Japan. Here, people pay to interact with cats, since most Tokyo apartments do not allow pets.


32. Only after 3 hours in Tokyo learned that Hiroshima had been bombed.


33. In 2011, the residents of Sendai received an earthquake warning 10-30 seconds before the main seismic waves hit. Residents of Tokyo, the Japanese Earthquake Early Warning System (EEW) notified of the impending wave in 60 seconds. Messages were relayed via mobile phones, TV shows and web pages across the country.


34. The Tokyo metropolitan area has a larger population than Canada.


35. More than 70 unexploded WWII bombs are found in Tokyo every year.


36. Tokyo Tower was built from steel, a third of which was scrap metal (American tanks damaged in the Korean War). Often this building is used in the Japanese kaiju film genre. It also became the site of the culminating "battles" of Godzilla, Mothra and King Kong.



37. Tokyo is by far the richest city on Earth. If it were a city-state, then Tokyo would still be among the ten richest countries in terms of GDP.


38. The former Tokyo governor claimed that the Nanjing Massacre (the mass rape and murder of Chinese civilians by the Japanese military) never happened.


39. Because of Tokyo's location on a tectonic fault, geologists call it the "city waiting for death."


40. There are rumors that a secret underground city is supposedly located under Tokyo, but officials vehemently deny this information.


41. The ancestors of modern Japanese inhabited these lands in the era of stone axes. Previously, this city was a military fortress and was called "Edo".


42. Tokyo became the capital of Japan only in 1868. Prior to that, for 1075 years, the capital was the city of Kyoto.



43. In 1923, a terrible earthquake destroyed almost half of Tokyo and killed more than 90,000 people (earthquake facts).


44. The cost of a square meter of real estate in the business center of the city here reaches 2 million dollars.


45. Due to the high price of real estate in Tokyo, capsule micro-apartments have become widespread. 


46. Some establishments here do not allow foreigners. A sign can hang right on the door, which means "foreigners are not served."


47. Despite the relative popularity of tattoos among Japanese youth, a person with a tattoo on exposed areas of the body will most likely not be allowed into any decent restaurant. In Japan, tattoos are strongly associated with the yakuza and the underworld.


48. In order to get rid of traffic jams in Tokyo, a huge number of high-speed highways were built, but the passage on them is paid.


49. The cost of parking here is fabulously high. 



50. Fruits and vegetables are expensive here. 


51. The most popular area for Tokyo youth looking for entertainment is Harajuku. It is here that you can meet the owners of the strangest outfits and hairstyles.


52. In Tokyo, there is a restaurant "Aragawa", which from year to year occupies one of the first places in the list of the most expensive establishments in the world.


53. An asteroid discovered in 1900 by a Tokyo astronomer was named after this city.


54. The zoo in Tokyo closes for two months each year so that its inhabitants can take a break from visitors.



55. “Cat cafes” are common here - establishments where you can play with these fluffy creatures. 


55. They have become popular because most Japanese people love cats, but in most households, the rules forbid keeping pets (cat facts).


56. The air temperature in Tokyo is usually 9-10 degrees higher than outside the city. The reason for this is a huge amount of infrastructure radiating into space, plus 13 million inhabitants, whose bodies also warm the air around.


57. There are about 150 earthquakes in Tokyo every year, but most of them are so weak that people don't even notice them. A similar situation is observed, by the way, in Santiago, the capital of Chile.


58. The capital occupies only 0.6% of the area of ​​Japan, but it provides a third of its total GDP.


59. The GDP of the city of Tokyo alone is higher than the GDP of all of Australia.



60. Twice as many people live in the suburbs of the Japanese capital than in the city itself. In total, more than 35 million people live in and near the city. This is about 60 times more than the population of Montenegro.


61. Based on the area of ​​​​the city and the population, there are about 4 square meters per inhabitant.


52. Tokyo's ubiquitous vending machines sell everything from chocolates and hamburgers to used women's underwear.


53. The dog Hachiko, famous all over the world due to his devotion, was waiting for his master right here, at Tokyo's Shibuya station, until his death.



54. In major Japanese cities, many homeowners ban pets, which is why "cat cafes" have appeared in Tokyo - for a low fee, visitors can choose a cat and pet it while drinking lemonade or tea.


55. The Tokyo subway system is the world's largest in terms of ridership, with 3.2 billion people a year. An interesting fact is that there is even a special position here - osiya, or pushers, whose duties include pushing passengers into overcrowded cars.


56. Public transport in Tokyo is the most reliable, affordable and fastest way to get around. But still, he's not cheap.


57. The asteroid Tokyo, discovered in this city in 1900, was named after the city. This is an irregularly shaped celestial body with a diameter of approximately 81 kilometers.


58. Tokyo Ueno Zoo is Japan's oldest zoo with over 2,600 pets. 


59. If you say at least a couple of phrases to the Japanese in Tokyo in their language, they will be very happy, because they believe that foreigners simply cannot learn Japanese because of its phenomenal complexity.



60. The population density in Tokyo is one of the highest among cities in the world, and there are only 4 square meters per person. In total, more than 35,000,000 people live in the Tokyo agglomeration.


61. There are a lot of single people in Tokyo who have never been in any kind of relationship with the opposite sex. Because of this, the suicide rate is extremely high.


62. If Tokyo were a separate country, it would be 15th place in the world in terms of GDP.


63. Tokyo is the safest metropolis in the world. Tokyo is so safe that young children use public transport on their own.


64. Tokyo's Shinjuku-Ni-Cheme area has the largest concentration of gay bars in the world.


65. Dressing up as your favorite manga or anime character and organizing a performance in Tokyo is a completely normal pastime.



66. Since the "Land of the Rising Sun" is located in a seismically active zone, earthquakes often occur here. In 1923, a powerful earthquake destroyed about half of Tokyo's infrastructure, killing more than 90,000 people in the process.


67. In the capital, real estate costs fabulous money. For 1 m 2 in the business center of Tokyo, the buyer will have to pay about $ 2 million!


68. Due to the high cost of housing, there are many micro-apartments in Tokyo. Their area varies within 10 m².


69. Parking in the city center for 1 hour is approximately $15.


70. Curiously, Harajuko is predominantly populated by young people. For this reason, in this region you can see many people with original hairstyles and outfits.



71. An interesting fact is that in the capital, rail transport is the most common type of public transport.


72. The Tokyo Stock Exchange is one of the three largest stock exchanges in the world.


73. Unlike some other megacities like Kuala Lumpur or Manila, Tokyo can be called a safe city with a clear conscience. True, foreigners are not welcome here everywhere. Some establishments here, as in the Korean capital of Seoul, put up a sign stating that "foreigners are not served."


74. Formally, Tokyo ceased to exist as a city in 1943 and was no longer displayed on maps. Officially, Tokyo refers to the 62 administrative divisions that make up the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. 


75. Moreover, the 23 special districts included in it, which made up Tokyo until 1943, are now equated in status with individual cities that have their own mayor and their own city council.


76. An indicator of the exceptional transparency of the air in Tokyo - if from it you can see the sacred Mount Fuji located 100 kilometers from it - the national symbol of Japan. But this happens very rarely.


 


77. Fujiyama, in fact, is not a mountain, but a volcano, although it is listed as weakly active. Its last eruption occurred in 1707. Then Edo was covered with a cloud of volcanic ash.


78. Tokyo is one of the few capitals in the world located in a seismically active zone. And at the same time - the only one, because the world's largest economy is located here. 


79. The earth on which it stands is shaken by earthquakes of various strengths about 150 times a year.


80. The Tokyo subway is also the largest in the world in terms of passenger traffic: more than 8.5 million passengers a day. Of these, 3 million are at Shinjuku Station alone, the busiest transport hub in the world. 


81. However, trains must still leave stations without delay. That is why passengers are helped by special employees - osiya ("pushers"): they push them into the cars and make sure that the doors do not jam anyone's luggage.


82. One of the main attractions of Tokyo is Ginza, the main street of Tokyo's administrative center and the main shopping street. Walking on it is a kind of ritual. The whole street is one continuous showcase of shops located on it. 



83. Buying here is not available to everyone, but it is prestigious. And also such a purchase means that you belong to the middle class - the basis of the entire Japanese economy.


84. From an architectural point of view, Tokyo is a gray and featureless city, devoid of frills and sights. 


85. After World War II, mass construction began in the rapidly developing city, and it was guided by only three principles: pragmatism, expediency, and economy. 


86. Tokyo can be amaze with an abundance of gray and inexpressive streets, many of which do not even have a name.


87. In Tokyo, as in other major cities in Japan, it is forbidden to keep any animals at home - the unanimous point of view of Japanese homeowners.


88. The onset of cherry blossom season, which is an important part of spring in Japan, marks the end of harsh winters. Cherry blossoms can be enjoyed for only two weeks during the whole year.



89. With a noodle shop and a beer garden on top, Takao-san is the world's most visited mountain on the western edge of Tokyo.


90. Tokyo Tower, modeled after the Eiffel Tower, is repainted with approximately 7,500 gallons of paint every 5 years.


91. Tokyo's Ritz Carlton has the most expensive room in the city, costing as much as $25,000.


92. The longest concert in Tokyo was the concert of the American band Guns N'Roses, which lasted three hours and thirty-seven minutes.


93. No matter how old people in Japan are, the Komagata Dozeu restaurant managed to survive the earthquakes and bombings, and managed to continue operating on the same piece of land for six generations (150 years).



94. Tokyo Skytree became the tallest tower in 2010. The official name was determined by a voting system. The current name received 30% of the votes and was announced on June 10, 2008 as "Tokyo Skytree".


95. Shinjuku Station has 36 platforms, including an underground entrance, an overhead entrance, and many corridors. Moreover, there are more than 200 different exits.


96. Tokyo in translation means the eastern capital. There are approximately 150 earthquakes in Tokyo every year.


97. In Japan, growing plants is an art.


98. The new generation of Japanese is not as small as Europeans think.


99. The Japanese tend to believe that all foreign countries, especially America, are dangerous to visit.


100. You can buy batteries, beer, wine, condoms, cigarettes, comics, hot dogs, light bulbs, and used women's underwear from Tokyo's vending machines.



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@Jessy I am learning Japanese, hope I will study in Tokyo
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