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20 abandoned places that enchant with their detachment and unique atmosphere

1 year ago
20-abandoned-places-that-enchant-with-their-detachment-and-unique-atmosphere

Many people have a passion for how they like to walk in abandoned places that have long been abandoned by man and taken into their "hands" by nature. These places keep a special atmosphere that attracts and repels at the same time, and now you will see for yourself.

 

It looks like an eerie abandoned church and a scary gingerbread house at the same time. 

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"I was in Vietnam and stumbled upon a long-forgotten burial carriage in an overgrown barn."

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Traces of an alien civilization, which are actually abandoned anti-aircraft installations during the Second World War

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Largest abandoned teddy bear store found in Pennsylvania

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Abandoned Russian Church

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Abandoned residential complex in Turkey

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Abandoned apartment covered with snow and ice, Vorkuta, Russia

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Bus stop in Kazakhstan

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Abandoned Gothic Church in Portugal

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Tower of Saint John the Baptist, Italy

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Water tower in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia

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Abandoned house in Watsonville, California

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Cemetery of Soviet military aircraft

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The last house on Holland Island

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It was once someone's home

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Abandoned British Colonial Island, India. The buildings here now have trees

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An entire abandoned island in Japan

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Somewhere in Scotland

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Abandoned amusement park in Nara prefecture, Japan

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40 years later in the same place. Someone's childhood is left here. Pripyat, Ukraine

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an-artist-paints-old-black-and-white-photos-to-show-how-the-distant-past-looked-in-color

There are many ways to preserve memories, but photography is probably one of the most common and accessible of all. With the help of photography, you can stop time and capture a moment that, after years and centuries, descendants will be able to admire. However, very old photographs are only black and white and do not fully convey the beauty of the moment. But in this case, a digital artist comes to the rescue, Sebastian de Oliveira, who uses Photoshop to color old photographs and bring them back to life. 

 

Happy couple, 1948

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Circus Girls in Sarasota, Florida, 1949

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Wartime beach on the English coast, 1941

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Audrey Hepburn, 1956

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French women at the fair, Paris, 1935

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A car and a girl, 1942

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People resting on the beach, France, 1967

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Actress Rita Hayworth, 1947

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Marilyn Monroe resting on the set of the movie "The Misfits", 1960

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Family Picnic by the River, Louisiana, July 4, 1940

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Spectators at the horse races in Worthington, Maryland, 1941

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On the set of the film "Casablanca" 1939

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Waiting for the bus, 1943

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 Father and son, 1946

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Ava Gardner, 1944

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Photo taken by photographer Georges Dambier, 1948

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French soldier in a trench, 1916

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fourth-of-july-2021-facts-and-history-to-celebrate-the-independence-day

Independence Day is the day of the signing of the US Declaration of Independence in 1776, which proclaimed the independence of the United States from the Kingdom of Great Britain. This holiday, which Americans simply call “Fourth of July,” is a federal holiday that marks the adoption of the July 4 Declaration by the Continental Congress. He stated that thirteen American colonies consider themselves a new nation, the United States of America and are no longer part of the British Empire. Bemorepanda collected some interesting facts for you, and of course the history of the event.

 

American Independence Day is the national day of the United States.

History of the Fourth of July - Brief History & Early Celebrations - HISTORY

Independence Day in the USA History of the holiday. During the American Revolution, the legal secession of the Thirteen Colonies from Britain in 1776 actually occurred on July 2, when the Second Continental Congress voted to approve an Independence Resolution that had been proposed for consideration in June by Richard Henry Lee from Virginia. At that time, the inhabitants of 13 British colonies, which were located along the east coast of today's United States, were at war with the English king and parliament due to the fact that the British Parliament passed the "Currency Act" in 1764. This law prohibited the administration of the American colonies from issuing their own, unsecured and uncontrollably printed money and obliged them to continue to pay all taxes in gold and silver coins. In other words, the law forced the colonies to the gold standard. In 1775 the war broke out.

 

The Committee of Five, led by Thomas Jefferson, prepared the Declaration of Independence. Congress discussed and revised the wording of the Declaration, finally approving it two days later on 4 July. For the first time in an official document, the colonies were called United.

 

From the outset, Americans celebrated the national holiday on July 4, the date specified in a widely publicized Declaration, rather than July 2, when the resolution was approved in closed session of Congress.

 

Historians have long debated whether members of Congress signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, although Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and Benjamin Franklin all later wrote that they signed it that day. Most historians have come to the conclusion that the Declaration was signed almost a month after its adoption on August 2, 1776, and not July 4, as is commonly believed.

4th of July Activities for Campers | Sun RV Resorts

History of the holiday Independence Day This day is usually associated with fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, concerts. The holiday is also famous for baseball games, family gatherings, political speeches and ceremonies, as well as various other social events dedicated to the history, government and traditions of the United States.

 

As with other summer events, the celebration often takes place outdoors. July 4th is a federal holiday, so some federal offices (such as the Postal Service and federal courts) close on this day.

 

Families often celebrate it by hosting friends or attending picnics or barbecues. Many take advantage of the weekend to get together with family or friends. Decorations (such as streamers, balloons, and clothing) are usually painted in the red, white, and blue of the American flag. Parades are often held in the morning, before family gatherings, while fireworks are held in the evening after dark in parks and city squares.

 

America's Independence Day Fireworks are often accompanied by patriotic songs such as the national anthem "The Star-Spangled Banner," "God Save America," "America the Beautiful," "My Country," "This Land Is Your Land," "The Stars and stripes forever. " The Yankee Doodle is popular in the northeastern states and Dixie in the southern states.

Will there still be 4th of July fireworks across the mid-state amid the  COVID-19 pandemic? | WHP

In some states, fireworks are prohibited or limited in size and type for safety reasons. In addition, local weather conditions can dictate whether the sale or use of fireworks is permitted.

 

A one-gun salute for each state in the United States, called the "union salute," fires on Independence Day at noon at any military base.

 

In 2009, New York City had the largest fireworks display in the country, with over 22 tons of pyrotechnics exploding. Other major fireworks display takes place in Chicago on Lake Michigan, Boston on the Charles River, St. Louis on the Mississippi River, San Francisco over San Francisco Bay, and on the National Mall in Washington, DC.

 

Interesting coincidences on July 4th in America. Coincidentally, both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, both of the signers and later presidents of the United States, died on the same day: July 4, 1826, when they celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Declaration.

 

Yes! This is your day, America! On July 4, 1776, the United States became an independent state. It's time for Americans to get out and clean old barbecues, stock up on fireworks, hot dogs and beer. We invite everyone else to have fun by reading 10 facts about American Independence Day.

 

1. So, on this day

In 1776, the American colonies were declared free and independent from Britain and its king.

 

2. During the first 20 years, Independence Day was not celebrated on July 4

Постеры на тему Дня независимости стали модным трендом

The date was officially declared a holiday only in 1870, almost a hundred years after the Declaration was written and signed. For example, the second president of the United States, John Adams, believed that Independence Day should be celebrated on July 2. He believed that this very date, when Congress voted for the Declaration, should be celebrated as a holiday. In a letter to his wife, Adams wrote that "July 2 should be celebrated with pomp and parade, sports, bonfires, bells and festivals." In the early years after the signing of the Declaration, there was controversy over whether the country should celebrate at all. While Democrats and Republicans were delighted with the Declaration, the Federalists considered the celebration of independence "unpatriotic, anti-British and too French."

 

3. There are more of them

Карта США

In 1776, when thirteen states declared independence from the British Empire, the nation consisted of 2.5 million citizens. These two million citizens celebrated the first on July 4th. Today, the country has over 320 million citizens and the population continues to grow.

 

4. Three American presidents died on July 4:

Томас Джефферсон - Джон Адамс - Джеймс Монро

Thomas Jefferson - July 4, 1826

John Adams - July 4, 1826

James Monroe - July 4, 1831

 

It is noteworthy that two of them, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, who signed the Declaration of Independence, died on the same day.

 

Another president, Zackery Taylor, passed away on July 9, 1850, after the Fourth of July celebration, from food poisoning.

 

5. Born on July 4

Памятная монета с изображением Президента Калвина Кулиджа

President Calvin Coolidge was born on July 4, 1872, which provided another reason to write his name in the history books.

 

6. Another country celebrates Independence Day on July 4 - the Philippines.

Празднование Дня независимости Филиппин

 

7. Instead of an eagle, a turkey could become a symbol of America

Представьте: индейка символ независимости США...

Benjamin Franklin wanted the turkey to become America's national symbol. He believed that the bald eagle was a bird with poor moral characteristics, the turkey, in his opinion, was the more respectable option. Fortunately, his point of view was not supported.

 

8. Fireworks

Фейерверки на День независимости

Every year, Americans launch about 200 million kg of fireworks! And most of them are imported from China - for $ 247.1 million. From there, American flags are brought in for $ 5-6 million annually.

 

9. Hot dog!

Хот-доги в чикагском стиле - это вкусно

Most Americans spend July 4 outdoors, picnicking with family and friends. The favorite dish is obviously the hot dog. America eats about 150 million hot dogs on this day.

 

10. The most drunk holiday

Выпьем?

The fourth of July is unofficially known as the drunkest holiday in the United States. The tradition began in 1778, on the second day of the Independence Day celebrations. Then US President George Washington ordered a double shot of rum to be given to the military to mark the anniversary of the signing of the Declaration. Since then, sales of beer and other alcoholic beverages have grown tenfold during this period. In recent years, Americans have been drinking $ 1 billion worth of beer alone in honor of Independence Day. And that's not counting other alcoholic drinks.



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30-facts-about-the-renaissance-that-you-wont-find-in-a-history-book

The Renaissance is called the period of European history, marking the transition from the Middle Ages to the New Age and covering the 15th and 16th centuries. Some researchers consider it the beginning of the era of humanism. Others believe it is a step backward because magic and witch-hunts flourished in parallel with the flourishing of art in the Renaissance.

 

Top facts about the Renaissance

 

We at Bemorepanda decided to find out more about the mysterious Renaissance. We dug up exciting facts that will allow you to draw your conclusions about whether that time is rightly called the Renaissance.

 

 

1. In Renaissance Florence, men married at 30, while girls became wives at 17–18. Such an age difference led to the fact that there were many young widows in the city.

 

2. The life of the ladies in Florence was not sweet. Having visited this city, a French traveler wrote: “Women are more reserved here than in any other part of Italy; they see the world only through small holes in their windows.”

 

3. According to other information, the ladies were forbidden even to look out the window to not tempt random passers-by on the street.

 

4. The main task of women was to be beautiful. Therefore, they were forbidden to play wind instruments: it distorted their facial features. The ladies were asked to master the strings, such as the lute.

 

5. The most beautiful room in the palace was the bedroom. They received guests there.

 

6. Hairstyles that covered the ears were in fashion. Women wore them for fear of pregnancy. According to legend, the Virgin Mary became pregnant through her ear after hearing the word of God.

 

 

7. One of the principal masterpieces of the Renaissance - "The Last Supper" by Leonardo da Vinci - is in poor condition because of the great painter's love of experimentation. Instead of applying paint to wet plaster, as was usually done when creating a fresco, the master decided to develop the "Last Supper" on drywall. As a result, the paint began to peel off, and Leonardo had to correct his work before it was finished. Perhaps in the Last Supper that we see today, almost nothing remains of the original.

 

8. The Renaissance style icon was Henry VIII, who introduced square-toed shoes into fashion. At the same time, he strictly regulated the trend, issuing an order that limited the width of the sock to 6 inches (15.24 cm).

 

9. During the Renaissance, a fashion trend arose to reveal what was hidden under clothing to the world. And all thanks to the English laws on luxury, which ordered commoners to have a single-color wardrobe. They came up with slits on them to diversify their monotonous costumes, thereby demonstrating the lower layer of clothing painted in bright colors.

 

10. The professions of a surgeon and a hairdresser were different facets of the same work. The same artisans could pull out a tooth and cut their hair.

 

11. At the same time, Renaissance doctors began to do plastic surgery. At that time, duels and diseases could significantly spoil a man's appearance, but surgeons were able to fix it. They performed rhinoplasty, transplanting a piece of skin from the forearm to the bridge of the nose. Thanks to the artisans of the Renaissance, many celebrities today can boast of chiseled noses.

 

 

12. Another Renaissance invention is ice cream. The Medici family announced a competition for the most unusual dish, the winner of which was a Florentine chicken seller, who presented a frozen dessert to the court of the famous family. Around the same time, another Florentine, the courtier Bernardo Buonaletti, was organizing a celebration in honor of the arrival of the Spanish guests. He put on theatrical performances and set off fireworks. Most importantly, he prepared a cream with the taste of bergamot, lemons, and oranges, chilled with a mixture of his invention.

 

13. The famous Uffizi Gallery was not conceived as a museum. It was the official center of Florence. Actually, "Uffizi" is translated as "offices".

 

14. The famous Roman Colosseum served as an industrial building during Renaissance. In the 16th century, it was planned to turn it into a wool factory, but this would have led to its destruction. In 1594, a glue factory was built in the building. By the end of the 17th century, the ancient stadium had turned into a dump.

 

15. During the Renaissance, the Latin language ceased to be alive. Back in the Middle Ages, it was spoken and evolved. Still, the enthusiasm of Renaissance scientists for Antiquity led to the fact that Latin returned to its classical form and its natural development stopped.

 

 

16. The Renaissance got its name because, in these few centuries, the flourishing of interest in ancient culture began, which had utterly faded away in the previous Middle Ages.

 

17. The second name of this era is the Renaissance. It comes from the French "Renaissance" and means, in fact, "Renaissance." Interestingly, this world-famous name came from the French language, although the Renaissance began in Italy.

 

18. To describe this era outside of Italy north of the Alps, "Northern Renaissance" is used. And some researchers even single out the French Renaissance, the Renaissance, Spanish, English, and others.

 

19. During the Renaissance, she was not called by this word. It was popularized and introduced by the French historian Jules Michelet only in the 19th century.

 

20. The Renaissance lasted a little less than three centuries, at least where it originated, that is, in Italy - from the beginning of the 14th century to the end of the 16th. But it came to some other countries later and ended there too later.

 

21. The names of the most famous Renaissance artists are familiar to the world. Leonardo da Vinci was generally a “universal man” who succeeded in everything, including Michelangelo, Titian, and Raphael Santi.

 

 

22. The Renaissance had a significant impact on the development of the sciences. In this era, medieval superstitions began to lose popularity, more attention was paid to scientific development, and the most important discoveries were made. In particular, the Great Geographical Discoveries and the findings of Nicolaus Copernicus.

 

23. Renaissance literature began, by all accounts, with the Divine Comedy by the famous Dante Alighieri. This work became so popular that it brought the Tuscan dialect of Italian to the forefront, effectively establishing it as the "official Italian."

 

24. With the beginning of the Renaissance, music ceased to be a purely ecclesiastical art. It began to spread around the world, imbued with a new worldview.

 

25. The ancestor of the Renaissance in Russia is considered the Grand Duke of Moscow, Ivan III. The latter invited Italian architects and other masters to Moscow. But in general, the influence of the 

Renaissance in Russia was relatively weak due to its remoteness and attachment to Byzantine traditions.

 

26. The Vatican stubbornly opposed many of the ideas of the Renaissance, and many scientists, poets, and writers were persecuted, but they had their patrons. In France, such as, for example, the wise King Francis I, a well-known philanthropist.

 

 

27. In the Renaissance, the old prejudices were supplanted, replaced by scientific views, but not entirely, as is commonly believed. For example, alchemy and astrology were considered essential sciences. The famous Galileo was engaged in the compilation of horoscopes, Isaac Newton wrote many works on alchemy, and the astronomer Johannes Kepler was also an astrologer.

 

It was the Renaissance that gave humanity oil painting. Jan van Eyck was a Dutch artist. Oil paints came to Europe early in the 12th century.

 

29. Of great importance to the Renaissance was the invention of the printing press by Johannes Gutenberg in 1450. This machine made books dozens of times more accessible, contributing to enlightenment.

 

30. One of the strangest events popular during the Renaissance was anatomical theater. This is a public autopsy carried out by doctors who commented and explained their actions to all those present. In the Middle Ages, the “desecration” of the human body was strictly prohibited. Still, during the Renaissance, these prejudices gradually died out, thanks to which anatomy and medicine began to develop rapidly.

 

 

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famous-women-in-history-and-their-incredible-contribution

They have amazing fortitude, are not afraid to take risks, and are ahead of their time. They delight, fascinate, and turn consciousness and history as a whole. And if suddenly you lack inspiration right now, let their stories become a source of that same charge of energy with which you can achieve no less success.

 

Who are the most famous women in history?

 

In our world, men generally accept that men made all great discoveries. They also invented everything, created innovative technologies, and naturally drove progress. But it's not in our selection of only 30 women who have changed the world. There are, of course, many more of them.

 

Katharine Hepburn

 

American actress Katharine Hepburn (Katharine Houghton Hepburn) was born in Hartford, Connecticut, on May 12, 1907. The Hepburns were an unusual family for their time and surroundings. The father of the future Hollywood star, Thomas Norval, was a well-known urologist in the city, and his mother, Catherine Martha Haughton, whom everyone called 'Keith,' went down in history as a leader of the feminist and suffragist movement; she was orphaned early, managed to get a higher education against the will of her guardian, picketed the White House with calls to improve working conditions for women and allow birth control. 

 

Famous people of that time - the writer Sinclair Lewis, the leader of the suffragist movement Margaret Sanger and others - were frequent guests in the Hepburns' house. Topics that were not customary to talk about then were freely discussed in the living room. The famous actress had five brothers and sisters, who were raised in an atmosphere of free thinking and personal responsibility for their actions, taught to swim in icy water and not be afraid of any work. Katherine Haughton was named after her mother; she was the second child after her brother Tom, whom she loved so much that after his death, she began to consider the date of his birth (November 8) as her own.

 

Marie Curie

 

Maria Curie-Sklodowska was born on November 7, 1867, in Warsaw in the family of a physics teacher. Maria graduated from secondary school in Warsaw with a gold medal, after which she worked as a tutor and governess for eight years. In the laboratory at the Museum of Industry and Agriculture in Warsaw, she passed the preparatory stage in research in chemistry and physics. In 1891-95. studied at the Faculty of Natural Sciences of the Paris Sorbonne University and graduated with a bachelor's degree in physical and mathematical sciences. In the house of Professor Kowalski, she met Pierre Curie, whom she married in 1895 and took French citizenship. The first publication of Curie-Sklodowska was published in 1898 and drew the attention of scientists to Becquerel rays.

 

Edith Clarke

 

Edith Clarke was the first woman to earn an electrical engineering degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She became the first female electrical engineering professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Edith was born into a prosperous family in Maryland in the late 19th century and had no idea that she would become a woman who would build a career as a scientist. Like most girls, she dreamed of being a good wife, mother, and gracious hostess. Later, Edith Clark did not let public expectations hinder her professional aspirations and became one of the most famous engineers of her era.

 

After studying mathematics and astronomy at Vassar College, Clark began her career as a teacher. While working in this position, she realized her genuine interest in technology, even though women in the early 20th century rarely dared to think about something like that. Edith briefly studied civil engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison but did not graduate and went on to earn a degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, becoming the first woman to do so.

 

As a woman, she could not find a job as an engineer but worked hard at it and eventually became an electrical engineer at the Central Station of General Electric's technical department and achieved great success with this company. Later she entered the electrical engineering department of the University of Texas at Austin.

 

Elizabeth Warren

 

In mid-March 2019, US Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren proposed splitting technology companies such as Apple, Facebook, Amazon, and Google. The senator's campaign received support from social networks.

 

Warren proposes to introduce a new category of companies - "platforms." These are virtual store companies with more than $25 billion in sales. Warren believes that Apple, Facebook, Amazon, and Google need to be broken up by forcing them to split or sell parts of their businesses and forbidding them from using their platforms to promote their products.

 

According to the senator, Google should give up ranking priority when searching for its services. Amazon should stop selling products from the Amazon Basics line and spin off Whole Foods into a separate business, and Facebook should sell Instagram and WhatsApp.

 

Warren is concerned about the power over information and, ultimately, the power over the economy that the tech giants have acquired. In her opinion, such companies suppress the development of small IT businesses and innovative technologies. Without platform separation, a new generation of IT leaders in the United States may never appear.

 

Facebook has already shown a prime example of its power: the platform removed Warren's presidential campaign ads. After rising indignation, advertising was returned. Subsequently, a Facebook spokesperson said that the company removed only four of Warren's advertisements due to Facebook's logo rules violations.

 

Either way, with the 2020 presidential election approaching, the internet giants will likely come under increasing criticism from senators. Facebook, in particular, is facing growing scrutiny from lawmakers over a range of issues, including its market share, the spread of misinformation on the platform, and the resale of user data.

 

Hillary Clinton

 

Hillary has a law degree. From 1965-to 1969, she attended Wellesley Women's Private College in Massachusetts, where she majored in political science and received a bachelor's degree. In 1973 she graduated from Yale University with a doctorate in law - where she met her future husband. In 1973 she worked as a legal adviser for the Children's Defense Fund in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and in 1974 - in the office of the Judiciary Committee of the US House of Representatives in Washington.

 

As First Lady of Arkansas, Hillary was active in public life, focusing on children, health, and education.

 

In 1980, she gave birth to a daughter, Chelsea, but the birth of a child did not make her give up her career as a lawyer. By the 1980s, she had established herself as one of the best lawyers in the United States - in 1988 and 1991. The National Law Journal named Clinton among the 100 most influential lawyers in the country.

 

After becoming the first lady of the United States after the election of Bill Clinton as president in the 1992 elections, at her husband's request, she headed the operational committee for the development of health care reform. Hillary went on to turn her attention to protecting the interests of children and women. Her weekly comments entitled "Let's talk" on the White House website were devoted to this issue.

 

After leaving the administration, Clinton began writing her memoirs and giving paid lectures. According to the press, her average fee for one public performance is about $200,000. Forbes magazine estimates Hillary's fortune at $45 million.

 

She is also the author of several books, among them "The whole world and other lessons that children ask us" (1996), "Invitation to the White House" (1999), and memoirs "Living History" (2003). The last book - "A Hard Choice" - was published in 2014.

 

Eleanor Roosevelt

 

First Lady of the United States, public figure, wife of 32 US President Franklin Roosevelt, niece of Theodore Roosevelt. Eleanor Roosevelt is also known as a publicist, writer and human rights activist, took part in the creation of the UN and belonged to the first wave of feminists. She died November 7, 1962.

 

In 1928, Franklin was elected Governor of New York, and in 1933 he became President of the United States. Eleanor Roosevelt's worries increased: she visited schools, hospitals and prisons, traveled around the country, met with voters. She defended the rights of black citizens of the United States, advocated the preservation of prohibition. During her absence from the capital, the duties of the First Lady were performed by her daughter Anne.

 

After the death of Franklin Roosevelt in 1945, Eleanor did not leave public life. She published a lot, dealt with the problems of youth and ethnic minorities. Eleanor Roosevelt became chairman of the Human Rights Committee and traveled to many countries, was part of the US delegation to the UN. President Kennedy appointed her to the Peace Corps and chair of the Women's Rights Commission, and later to the POW Commission.

 

Emmeline Pankhurst

Suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst was ready to literally do anything to defend the rights of women: she collected thousands of protests, participated in pogroms, went on a hunger strike in prison. The suffragettes faced violence and were arrested en masse, but in the end, under the leadership of Pankhurst, they won the right for women to vote.

 

In August 1914, Great Britain entered the First World War. Pankhurst called on members of the Women's Social and Political Union to temporarily suspend actions and rallies in order to help the motherland in wartime. Emmeline asked women to go to work in factories instead of men who went to the front. Between 1914 and 1918, about 2 million women took on jobs that men who had gone to war were temporarily unable to do. If at the beginning of the war only 24% of British women were employed, by the end of hostilities their share had grown to 37%.

 

Pankhurst opened an orphanage during the war and, at age 57, took care of four orphans herself. At the same time, Emmeline had no property for a long time: she sold her house back in 1907, and all her things were placed in a small suitcase. All of Pankhurst's money went to helping others and activism. She herself lived with friends and supporters of the suffragist movement. When Pankhurst was asked how, in such a difficult financial situation, she decided to take care of the orphans, the activist replied: “You’d better ask why I didn’t take forty children.”

 

Women's contribution to the economy during the First World War, as well as their dedication, convinced the government that suffrage should not be exclusively a male privilege. In 1918, the Representation of the People Act was passed. Women were allowed to vote provided they were over 30 years of age, were not restricted in their rights and occupied "land or premises in the district for business purposes generating at least £5 of income". In 1928, these restrictions were also lifted. English women were equal in voting rights with men. It was an absolute victory for the suffragettes. Emmeline Pankhurst died shortly thereafter on June 14, 1928.

 

Today, several monuments have been erected in her honor, including in Manchester and London. Time magazine included her in the list of 100 most prominent figures of the 20th century, noting that Pankhurst "created the image of a woman of our time, transferring society to a new dimension from which it is no longer possible to return to the past."

 

Ada Lovelace

 

From the beginning of 1841, Lovelace began to study Babbage's machines in earnest. In one of the letters to Babbage, Ada writes: “You must tell me the basic information regarding your car. I have good reason for wanting it." In a letter dated January 12, 1841, she outlines her plans: "...Some time in the future (maybe within 3 or 4, and possibly even many years) my head can serve you for your goals and plans ... Precisely I want to have a serious talk with you on this matter." This proposal was gratefully accepted by Babbage. Since that time, their cooperation has not been interrupted and has given brilliant results.

 

Since 1844, Ada Lovelace has become more and more interested in playing at the races, especially since she herself rode beautifully and loved horses. Both Babbage and William Lovelace played at the races, and Babbage, who was interested in applied problems of probability theory, considered the game at the races from these positions and was looking for the optimal game system. However, both Babbage and Ada's husband withdrew from the game relatively soon. But Ada, reckless and stubborn, continued to play. Moreover, Lady Hell became close to a certain John Cross, who blackmailed her. She used up almost all of her funds and by 1848 had become heavily indebted.

 

Then her mother had to pay off these debts, and at the same time buy incriminating letters from John Cross. In the early 50s, the first signs of the disease that claimed the life of Ada Lovelace appeared. In November 1850, he writes to Babbage: "My health ... is so bad that I want to accept your offer and appear on arrival in London to your medical friends." Despite the measures taken, the disease progressed and was accompanied by severe suffering. On November 27, 1852, Ada Lovelace died at the age of 37. Together with her outstanding intellect, her father passed on to her this terrible heredity - an early death - the poet died at the same age ... She was buried next to her father in the Byron family crypt.

 

Successes were given to her with great effort and not without damage to health. Augusta Ada Lovelace accomplished little in her short life. But the little that came out of her pen inscribed her name in the history of computational mathematics and computer technology as the first programmer. In memory of Ada Lovelace, the ADA language, developed in 1980, is one of the universal programming languages. This language was widely used in the United States, and the US Department of Defense even approved the name "Ada" as the name of a single programming language for the American armed forces, and later for the entire NATO.

 

Also in honor of Ada Lovelace, two small cities are also named in America - in the states of Alabama and Oklahoma. There is also a college named after her in Oklahoma.

 

Jane Austen

 

English writer, satirist, forerunner of realism in British literature. Her books are recognized as masterpieces in all countries of the world and are required to be studied in schools and institutes. Jane Austen is known as the "First Lady" of English literature.

 

Jane Austen was born at the end of the 18th century in Steventon, Hampshire. Father George was a priest from an old family. The Austin family was large: six boys and two girls (Cassandra and Jane).

 

Little is known about the writer Jane Austen. Many of her contemporaries even disagree about her appearance. Someone calls her "prim, capricious and unnatural", someone - "attractive, thin, graceful." All that remained of Jane was a portrait painted by her sister Cassandra.

 

In 1783 Jane studied at Oxford, Southampton and Reading with her sister. They were not lucky with their education. Somewhere met the tyrannical nature of the headmistress, but somewhere too soft. Jane's father took the girls home and began to educate them himself. Jane Austen grew up on the works of Shakespeare, Fielding, Stern, Thompson.

 

At the age of 14, Jane Austen wrote her first parody of the boring 18th century odes Love and Friendship. The little girl had the courage to write a parody pamphlet on the work of the English historian Goldsmith "History of England".

 

Jane Austen spent her whole life in her native estate, but kept an active correspondence with her brothers and their wives, who saw the events of the French Revolution, the war with Napoleon, the Indian War of Independence.

 

According to some testimonies, Jane Austen suffered from cancer and metastasis all her life. She died in Winchester in 1817, where she went to treat Addison's disease. She never finished her last novel, Sanditon.

 

Mother Teresa

 

Mother Teresa (worldly name - Agnes Gonje Boyadzhiu) was born on August 26, 1910 in the city of Uskyub of the Ottoman Empire (now the city of Skopje - the capital of the Republic of Macedonia) in a family of Catholic Albanians. She later called her real birthday August 27, when she was baptized.

 

According to Mother Teresa, from early childhood she wanted to devote herself to serving the church. This desire was strengthened at the age of 12 when she met missionaries from India. From that time on, she dreamed of living in India and caring for the poor there. After graduating from high school, in 1928 she left to study English in Ireland and became a novice in the Irish Sisters of Loreto Catholic monastic order.

 

The girl's parents were wealthy people: her father Nikola, a native of Armenia, owned a large construction company and sold medicines, and her mother, an Albanian Dranafile, devoted herself to prayers and worship. The family strictly followed Catholic traditions. Dranafile often visited the sick and needy with her children and invited the poor to her home for dinners. “My child, never eat a single bite until you share it with others,” she said to Agnese. When she asked who the unknown guests were, the mother replied: "Some of them are our relatives, but they are all our people."

 

It was believed that Mother Teresa helped the sick and the poor, alleviated their suffering by providing them with shelter, treatment and food. However, the nun had a special view of death and torment: she said that they should be glorified, not healed. She compared suffering with the noble torments of Christ and was opposed to painkillers: “There is something beautiful in the way the poor take their share, how they suffer, like Jesus on the cross. The world gains a lot from suffering. Anguish means that Jesus is kissing you."

 

Mother Teresa's main departments were the homes for the dying, where doomed people were to spend their last days. Writer Mary Loudon, a former volunteer, recalled: “The first impression of the footage was ... as if I had a photo from Bergen-Belsen [Nazi concentration camp. — Approx. ed.], because all the patients were shaved bald. There were no chairs, only cots, similar to those from the First World War. There was no garden, no yard, nothing at all. And I thought, “What is this? These are two rooms. One has 50 to 60 men, the other has the same number of women. Everyone is dying. They received virtually no medical care. They did not receive any painkillers other than aspirin.”

 

 

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@Tammina Best women ever
20-photos-from-the-past-proving-that-history-can-still-surprise-with-interesting-moments

The past has the same meaning as the future, and not only for an individual person, but for all of humanity. How can we build our lives without looking back at the past? This is not possible for us. Therefore, in order to stir up memories and tell you something new, we have collected the most interesting historical photos that will prove that there was a lot of fascinating things in the past.

 

Yuri and Tatiana Nikulin, USSR, 1983

07-10-48-1625471299244328466

 

Fashion guy with a Wispa motorcycle, 1990s

07-10-48-1625471302452105768

 

First color photograph, 1861

07-10-48-16254713051098271844

 

Opening ceremony of the 1980 Olympic Games in Moscow

07-10-48-16254713082109507095

 

Johnny Depp, 1969

07-10-48-1625471311425829570

 

Moscow, USSR, 1990

07-10-48-1625471316925848237

 

Marilyn Monroe, 1962

07-10-48-16254713191445886257

 

Marlene Dietrich detained at a train station in Paris for wearing men's trousers, 1933

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The law prohibiting women from wearing trousers was in force in France until 2013 (of course, no one followed it in recent decades)

 

Samuel L. Jackson, John Travolta, Harvey Keitel and Quentin Tarantino on the set of Pulp Fiction, 1994

07-10-48-1625471326769144006

 

Construction of the London Underground, 1898

07-10-48-16254713291726627481

 

 

A tomb carved from a single giant stone nearly 2,000 years ago in Arabia

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Single urinal. Paris, 1875

07-10-48-1625471337542965977

 

First IKEA store, Sweden, 1958

07-10-49-1625471340893484814

 

Tilda Swinton, 1988

07-10-49-1625471344170552073

 

Pistol duel used to be an Olympic sport, 1909

07-10-49-1625471348491668565

  

Jenny Joseph, 28, poses for the Columbia Pictures logo, 1992

07-10-49-1625471365359781273

 

Winona Ryder, 1990

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A startled observer at the annual Sydney gay pride parade Mardi Gras, 1994

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The last queen of Mongolia, Navaanluvsangiin Genenpil, who was shot in 1938 during the Stalinist repression by the decision of the Communist Party

07-10-49-1625471373789935426

 

Vladimir Putin during the celebration of the Tatar national holiday "Sabantuy" in Kazan, June 24, 2000

07-10-49-1625471380752995023



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