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Pictures of Ukrainian cities before and after the Russian bombing in 2022

2 months ago
pictures-of-ukrainian-cities-before-and-after-the-russian-bombing-in-2022

Russian missiles continue to devastate towns and villages in several parts of Ukraine. The following pictures show some of the localities that were destroyed by the Russian army and what they looked like before the start of the war. The Ukrainian dignitary presented the serious situation in which Ukraine finds itself, with the loss of human lives recorded so far: 18 airports are destroyed, 199 buildings destroyed, 10 cities that need to be evacuated urgently with over 150,000 people. These cities have faced attacks in the residential area and no longer have access to necessities. They need to be evacuated as a matter of urgency and have called for support.

 

Pictures of Ukrainian cities before and after the Russian bombing

 

The Kyiv TV Tower is a metal lattice structure 385 meters high, the highest in Ukraine.

 

The Kyiv TV tower hit by a Russian missile is located on the territory of Babi Yar. On September 29-30, 1941, the Nazis killed more than 33,000 Jews here. 80 years later, the Russians hit the same land to destroy the Ukrainians. You can see videos and photos posted by soldiers and civilians that captured moments of horror in our article.

 

Kyiv TV tower

 

Kharkiv, the largest city in Ukraine after Kyiv, is still the target of the Russian bombing, and the city center has suffered massive destruction.

 

Kharkiv regional administration building - before and after the bombing. 

Clădire din Harkov, după și înainte de bombardament

 

Ukrainian officials say residential areas in the city were ruthlessly hit on Wednesday night, and UN prosecutors say they have opened an investigation to determine whether Russia's bombings were war crimes. You can read more about Russian war crimes in Ukraine here.

 

Karazin University School of Economics in Kharkiv - before and after the bombing. 

Harkov-2

 

Three schools have so far been bombed in Ukraine. In Mariupol, the rockets hit a supermarket while people were shopping. In Kharkiv, shells hit a park full of people who interrupted their walks to shelter from the explosions.

 

Buildings in Constitution Square, Kharkiv - before and after the bombing. 

Harkov-3

 

These are just some of the attacks that Kharkiv residents have had to endure in recent days. In addition to blocks of flats and houses, Russian bombings have hit schools, shops, hospitals, and churches.

 

Freedom Square, Kharkiv - before and after the bombing.

Harkov-4

 

The city of Kherson, in southern Ukraine, considered the first major city that Russia managed to occupy, was recently conquered by Russian forces, who began to impose their own strict rules on the remaining civilians in the city.

 

Kherson city center, southern Ukraine - before and after the occupation. 

Herson-1

 

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has accused Russia of being a "terrorist state" as more and more bombs fall on Kyiv's population.

 

Residential building in Kyiv - before and after the rocket attack. 

Kiev-1

 

Satellite images captured war scenes in northern Ukraine, near the border with Belarus. The images show craters, smoke, and houses destroyed by Russian army rocket attacks.

 

Rivnopilia, Chernivov - before and after the bombing. 

Cernihov

 

The city of Irpen is located 20 km northwest of Kyiv. Last week, the regional center was on the front line. Artillery and airstrikes caused damage to the entire area, and the housing complex, which is in the photo, was destroyed.

 

Residential block in Irpen

 

Chernihiv is located 120 km northeast of Kyiv. In recent days, the city has also been shelled by the Russian military. On March 3, 30 people were killed in an attack on residential areas of the city, officials said.

 

Rocket strike on a residential area in Chernihiv

 

Vladimir Putin said in a press release on Thursday evening that Russia's military operation in Ukraine is going according to plan, and that Russian soldiers are acting like "true heroes". At the same time, the Kremlin leader accused the Ukrainian "neo-Nazis" of using the population as human shields in the face of Russia's offensive.

 

Russia plans to use various methods to control and reduce morale in Ukraine to discourage possible retaliation and resistance if they conquer large cities, says a European official.

 

The Russians' strategies include brutal repression of protests, imprisonment of opponents, and public executions, the official said, on condition of anonymity.

 

Russia has launched "over 480" missiles at Ukraine since the beginning of the invasion, a senior US defense official said on Thursday, according to CNN.

 

"Over 230" of the 480 "come from inside Ukraine," the official said. "They have mobile systems, they move them in," he added.

 

 "About 160 missiles were launched from Russia" and about 70 from Belarus, and a very small number - less than 10 - from the Black Sea, the official added.


 

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as-a-mother-it-scares-me-parents-in-ukraine-have-given-their-children-bracelets-with-their-names-and-blood-type-on-their-hands

Parents in Ukraine put their children's bracelets with their name, a mobile number and their blood type on their hands. "As a mother, it scares me," who lives in Dnipro, eastern Ukraine.


Hanna Syva lives with her family in a block of flats in Dnipro. She told BBC reporters how her life had changed in recent days since Ukraine was attacked.


When the invasion began, she moved her whole family into the living room to sleep behind the couch. On the window sill, next to a large plush toy, is a weapon.



Hanna has two children and she is trying to be optimistic. He admits that he smiles just so he doesn't worry about them.


"They cried yesterday, they are very nervous, so I can't afford to be scared," she said.


He put bracelets on the two boys with their names printed on them, a cell phone number and their blood type.


"It was incredible for me when I put the blood type data for paramedics. As a mother, it scares me," she said.


Meanwhile, all the people in the boat mobilized, she said. She and her neighbors cleared the basement and arranged it so that they could take shelter there. At the front door he has prepared bags with change of clothes, food and water.


In Kiev, a child sleeps for a few days in the bathroom, the safest place in the apartment.


Meanwhile, in Kiev, Olga, a woman living in the western part of the city. Her son, just a few years old, Vadim, is sleeping in the bathroom these days, because that is the safest place in the apartment.


"I sit next to him and caress him when he dreams badly," she told CNN. "We do not go to the shelter, it does not guarantee 100% safety, and this can affect a child's psyche. At home, he sleeps well, eats and thinks that everything is fun," the woman said.


Olga said she heard many explosions between 1:00 and 4:00 on Saturday morning.


Moscow officials say Russian troops are not targeting civilian targets in Ukraine. However, in less than three days since Russian President Vladimir Putin gave the order to invade Ukraine, 198 civilians were killed. Russian weapons hit a kindergarten and several blocks of flats.



Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on Friday tried to calm the world over civilian casualties.


"No one will attack the people of Ukraine," he told a news conference, adding that "there were no blows to the civilian infrastructure."


However, reports of bombed buildings and kindergartens, civilians killed and rockets found on residential streets have surfaced since the offensive began.


Videos from social networks, photos and satellite images analyzed and geolocated by CNN confirm that several times densely populated areas have been hit by Russian forces.



Amnesty International has accused Russian forces of "indiscriminate attacks on civilian areas and blows to protected objects, such as hospitals", citing three examples, including a Thursday attack on a hospital building in Vuhledar in the eastern Donetsk region. The attack killed four civilians and injured ten others, according to Amnesty.

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the-war-in-ukraine-continues-ukrainians-share-emotional-videos-with-the-slogan-my-home-my-ukraine

Ukrainians are shocked and horrified by what is happening to them. Sirens are heard in Kiev, and people are fleeing the city. Images appeared with huge columns of cars blocking the highway at the exit from Kiev. Meanwhile, others have taken refuge in subway stations or are kneeling on the streets.


Several people from Kiev rushed to the underground subway stations to take shelter. Others boarded buses to leave the city.


On social media, people send messages saying that they are panicking and that they are trying to get to anti-aircraft shelters and basements as soon as possible. Reporters filmed groups of people praying on the street, kneeling.


In addition to panic, Ukrainians are creating videos with the slogan "My Home. My Ukraine." These videos are profound and painful. People want peace and a future for their children. Ukraine is truly a beautiful country, with many places where nature fills your soul, and the picturesque views are breathtaking. A country full of traditions, color and greenery. Ukraine is the home of its nation, and at this time, many will lose their homes as a result of the bombings, people are forced to leave their homes, to flee their country.


My home. My Ukraine

The first bombings took place just after 5 o'clock in the morning.


Residents of Kiev were told to stay in their homes and prepare a bag with the essentials in case they should leave urgently.


In the city, red arrows have been drawn on several walls indicating the locations of the nearest anti-aircraft shelters. These insignia have existed since 2014, and now they have been marked once again with intense color, so that they can be easily observed.


At 6:18 a.m., two hours before the start of the school day, the parents of the children attending the Ivan Franko school in central Kiev received a message to keep the children at home and that the classes would be held online.


Residents of Ukraine's capital, Kiev, woke up to explosions and sirens on Thursday morning, and the city panicked: many tried to seek shelter, while others fled the town. Even after weeks of warnings from Ukrainian and Western leaders that a Russian attack was imminent, some Kiev residents were caught unprepared.


Many people rushed to anti-aircraft shelters or subway stations to take shelter. Others sat in long queues at banks, supermarkets, or gas stations. Some fled west by car.


"I didn't expect that. I didn't think anything would happen until this morning," said Nikita, a 34-year-old marketer as she waited in a long line at a bottle stack. of water in the shopping cart. "I am a healthy adult. I packed my bags, bought food and stayed home with my family," he said.

Other residents were determined to move to western Ukraine, which they considered relatively safe. During the morning, traffic was blocked on the four lanes of the main road to the western city of Lviv. The cars were parked side by side for tens of kilometers, according to witnesses quoted by Reuters.


Among those who tried to leave is 31-year-old Alex Svitelskyi, who says he wants to take his parents out of town. He is also worried about his sister: "I want her away from here."

The effects of the attacks were immediately apparent in Ukraine. In addition to the affected buildings in various cities, in the capital Kiev people did their best to leave. Queues formed at ATMs, supermarkets and gas stations, while thousands of cars crowded out of town. An extremely affected area was also near Kharkov, in the city of Chiuhiv, where a blockade was devastated by a Russian rocket.



"Fighting is taking place in almost the entire territory of Ukraine. So far, 203 Russian military attacks have been reported," the Ukrainian National Police said.


Armored columns are now heading for Kiev after fighting took place at the Hostomel air base on the northern outskirts of the Ukrainian capital.

Ukrainian citizens have begun withdrawing money from ATMs and stockpiling supplies. According to their testimonies, the internet networks have already started to be affected.


People explained that the authorities asked the people not to leave the houses and, if necessary, to take shelter in the basements. "There was a real panic and people started to leave Kiev. They bought products, withdrew money from ATMs. City officials are trying to stop the panic by asking people to stay indoors and, if necessary, go down to basements or bomb shelters. The sirens sounded in the streets several times. There are constant explosions and fires. "

In Lutsk, the fire station was damaged, no one was injured. One person was injured when the airport was bombed. An "air raid" was reported in Poltava. Fire in the military depots in the village. Raduşinţi (Poltava region). At Khmelnitsky, a shell hit the runway of a military airfield. In Nijin, six people woke up under the rubble of the airfield, they are working for their release.


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at-romanian-and-moldovan-customs-ukrainian-children-cry-for-fathers-left-at-home-to-defend-the-country

Tens of thousands of families in Ukraine are simultaneously experiencing the drama of war and partition, after Kiev authorities enacted martial law and banned men who could defend their country from crossing borders. They remained to face the enemy, but they sent their families across the border, with tears in their eyes and broken hearts. In Romania and Moldova, thousands of women have been crossing the border for almost 24 hours, alone or in groups, accompanied by elderly parents or babies and children.

 

The drama of a Ukrainian who embraces his daughter only a few years old, whom he sends away from the war with only his mother, has been repeated in Ukraine hundreds and thousands of times. Adult men capable of fighting can no longer leave the country after the president introduced martial law.

 

Nazar is 13 years old. His mother fled Ukraine alone with him and his younger sister. The father remained in the country. Here is a conversation between him and a reporter.

 

 

Reporter: What did he tell you before you left?

Nazar, Ukrainian refugee: He told me everything would be fine. And to send him pictures.

 

Nazar spoke with a knot in his throat about the separation of the family.

 

Reporter: What is your father doing now?

Nazar: He's a medical technician, but now he's helping the military if they're injured.

Reporter: Was he in the Army before?

Nazar: No, he wasn't in the military before.

 

He hopes to stay with his mother and sister in Poland, where they will stay with a family of friends, only temporarily.

 

Reporter: What would you have done instead of your father?

Nazar: I think I would have done the same.

Reporter: Would you have fought?

Nazar: Yes!

 

A young Ukrainian woman took her two-year-old daughter and came on foot to Moldova. She managed to get in on Thursday night. This morning, people with dramatic stories continued to cross the border. A woman left Ukraine with only her one-year-old daughter and mother. They crossed the border on foot. My brother and father stayed in the country. With tears in his eyes, he tells how he lived his last night in his homeland.

 

 

Reporter: Are you afraid for them?

Woman from Ukraine: Yes, sure! I was scared, there were bombings near us last night. I was scared.

 

Hundreds of women alone or accompanied only by children, many brought in arms, in carts or on foot, if they are older than a few years, have crossed the border into Romania and Moldova.

 

 

Reporter: Are you alone?

Woman from Ukraine: My father went to fight for the country. My son is in Europe, in Germany. I'm alone now.

Reporter: Was it hard to leave your husband there?

Woman from Ukraine: Yes, very difficult.

Reporter: You have tears in your eyes.

Woman from Ukraine: Yes, I'm crying. I hope everything will be fine. We ask you to help us, to pray for Ukraine.

 

 

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a-ukrainian-driver-offers-to-tow-a-fuel-free-tank-back-to-russia-do-you-have-any-idea-where-youre-going

The Russian Federation continued its attacks on Friday night to Saturday, including this morning, on several Ukrainian cities and the capital Kiev. Ukrainian officials say cruise missiles have been launched into Ukraine from the Black Sea. They reported several casualties among Russian forces. The Russian army's attacks hit a block of flats in central Kiev on Saturday morning. Meanwhile, President Zelensky reports from the center of the capital that the army will not surrender.


A dialogue between a Ukrainian driver and several Russian soldiers went viral on the Internet, after the Ukrainian offered to tow them the tank without fuel back to Russia.


The dialogue was filmed from the Ukrainian's car, which stops next to a tank on the side of the road. The video posted on social media went viral immediately.


Ukrainian driver: - Did something happen to you guys? It broke?


Russian soldiers: - I ran out of diesel.


Ukrainian driver: - Can I tow you back to Russia?


Russian soldiers: [Laughter]


Ukrainian driver: - Do you have any idea where you are going?


Russian soldiers: - No, no. In Kiev, damn it. What do I say on the news?


Ukrainian driver: - Everything is on our side, you surrender and you are prisoners, because you do not know where you are going ... I asked a whole convoy, people like you: no one knew where he was and where he was going.



The Russian Federation continued its attacks on Friday night to Saturday, including this morning, on several Ukrainian cities and the capital Kiev. Ukrainian officials say cruise missiles have been launched into Ukraine from the Black Sea. They reported several casualties among Russian forces. The Russian army's attacks hit a block of flats in central Kiev on Saturday morning. Meanwhile, President Zelensky reports from the center of the capital that the army will not surrender.


Russia is facing problems in its invasion of Ukraine, a NATO military official was quoted as saying by CNN. He says that the Russians are behind the program and that the situation is starting to get out of control.


The Russians "have problems. I'm in a fuel crisis, it's moving too slowly, and morale is obviously a hindrance, "the official was quoted as saying by CNN.


Ukrainian authorities have also begun dismantling traffic signs indicating directions to localities to make it more difficult for the Russian military to orient and move.


At the same time, the Ukrainian road company appealed to the population to lend a helping hand. People were asked to walk near the place where they live and to dismantle the road signs.



Europe is continuing its efforts to help Ukraine, which is at war with the Russian Federation. The Belgian prime minister has announced that his country will send 2,000 assault weapons and more than 3,800 tonnes of fuel.


Immediately after the announcement by Belgium, Slovakia also announced a new batch of aid. Authorities in Bratislava have announced that they will send 12,000 120 mm mortars, 10,000 tons of fuel, 2,400 tons of kerosene and two Bozena mine complexes.


Also today, the German Chancellor announced that he would allow allied countries to send German-made weapons to Ukraine.


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a-newlywed-couple-spends-their-honeymoon-on-the-ukrainian-battlefield

On the day Russia declared war on Ukraine, two young men from Kyiv united their destinies. Iarina Arieva and Sviatoslav Fursin formalized their marriage while the city sounded the alarm sirens for air raids.



The young bride Arieva said that although it was very scary, they did not want to give up.


"It simply came to our notice then. It should have been the happiest time of her life, but you hear that, ”said Arieva, who married her partner at St. Michael's Monastery in Kyiv.


The couple was planning to get married on May 6 and celebrate at a restaurant overlooking the Dnieper River, Arieva said.



But all that changed when Russian President Vladimir Putin announced a military operation in Ukraine on Thursday morning, and the attack began at dawn with rockets.


The invasion spread to central and eastern Ukraine, and Russian forces attacked the country from three sides, killing tens of millions of Ukrainians.



The two young men, who met in October 2019 during a protest in the center of Kiev, decided that they want to get married now because they do not know what the future holds for them.


"It simply came to our notice then. We will fight for our land. We can die and we just wanted to be together before all this. "



After their wedding, Arieva and Fursin prepared to go to the local Territorial Defense Center to join forces to defend the country.


"We must defend our country. We need to protect the people we love and the land we live in, ”she said.


Arieva does not know what task will be assigned to the couple. "It simply came to our notice then. Maybe we'll help with something else. They will decide, "she said.


Arieva described her husband as "her closest friend on Earth" and said she hoped that one day they would be able to celebrate their marriage.


"I just hope that everything will go normally and we will have our land, we will keep our country safe and happy without Russians in it," she said.



Just hours after their wedding on the first day of the Russian invasion, Yaryna Arieva and Sviatoslav Fursin joined the fight to protect their country.


The couple were due to get married in May, but rushed to Kyiv last week, when Russia invaded the country before joining Ukrainian resistance. Wearing camouflage jackets and holding a rifle, the couple talked to CNN reporter Don Lemon about spending their honeymoon living in a besieged city and taking up arms to fight Russian troops invading their homeland.


"It is difficult to understand this new reality that we have," said Arieva, who is from Kyiv.


Sviatoslav Fursin said he hoped that the time would come when he would be able to gather his family and friends “all in one place and drink a good glass of wine. And to tell everyone, "Come on, the war is over, we're winning."


Before that, however, he said he wanted "everyone in this world, including Russia and the Russian people, to remember" that he was fighting "for the freedom of the world."




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