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​50 interesting facts about the country of Tonga

6 months ago
50-interesting-facts-about-the-country-of-tonga

The islands of Tonga are practically unknown in the world, more precisely, most people on Earth do not even know about the existence of such a state. Recently, they are gaining popularity only among eco-tourists and downshifters.

 

Tonga is a tiny island country in the Pacific Ocean. People here live a habitual life that almost does not change over time, and even if they do not live richly, they are calm and quite happy. Here, no one cares about politics or the world economy - life here is limited to the territory of the country itself.

 

Tonga- top facts

 

1.Tonga is a small island country in the Pacific Ocean.

 

The majority of the world's population does not even suspect the existence of this country.

 

2. This state is located in Polynesia. The official name of the country is the Kingdom of Tonga.

 

3. The Kingdom of Tonga is an archipelago, it consists of 177 islands. Most of the islands of the Tonga archipelago are of volcanic or coral origin. Of the 177 islands, only 36 are inhabited by people.

 

4. These 36 islands have a total population of 108,020 people.

 

5. The total area of ​​Tonga is 748 square kilometers.

 

6. British explorer James Cook called Tonga "Friendly Islands" and this phrase is used by the country's tourism industry to this day to attract tourists from all over the world.

 

7. James Cook named these islands after attending a magnificent feast and festival in his honor, organized by the leader of the island of Haapai - Finau Ulukalala. But Cook did not even suspect that the feast was actually a red herring. Finau Ulukalala and members of his tribe wanted to attack Cook and his expedition and rob the ship. But the leader did not dare to do this and abandoned his idea shortly before the start of the feast.

 

 

8. The capital of the state is Nuku'alofa. This city was founded in 1795 on the island of Tongatapu. It is now the largest and most populous city in the Kingdom. Nuku'alofa is home to ¼ of the population of Tonga.

 

9. Tongatapu Island is an atoll with an area of ​​260 km², it is also the largest and most populous island in the state. About 70% of the country's population lives on the territory of this atoll.

 

10. The Kingdom of Tonga was created by King George Tupou I. During his reign, the first set of laws was created on the islands, and Christianity became popular. George Tupou I reigned from 1845 to 1893 until his death at 95. Under him, the period of wars and unrest, which lasted from 1799 to 1852, was completed, and a constitution was adopted.

 

11. Most of the country's inhabitants are Christians. 1/3 of the country belongs to the United Methodist Church, and 1/5 of the country belongs to the Mormons. Due to the fact that there is a small number of inhabitants, it turns out that Tonga is the leader among the countries of the world in terms of the number of Mormons per capita.

 

12. Tonga is a mono-national country, more than 96 percent of the population are Tongans.

 

 

13. Almost the entire population of the country has Polynesian roots. The inhabitants of TongA are closely related to the Samoans and other Polynesians in culture and language, as well as in genetic heritage.

 

14. The kingdom gained independence from Great Britain in 1970.

 

15. Life here is limited to the territory of the country itself. No one here cares about politics and the world economy. People here live a habitual life that almost does not change over time, and although they do not live richly, they are calm and quite happy.

 

16. Due to the lack of suitable stone for construction, almost all buildings in Tonga are made of wood. But the royal palace and the parliament building are made of stone, and building materials were delivered here from other places.

 

17. The Kingdom is located in the so-called Pacific volcanic ring of fire and has at least 4 active volcanoes on its archipelago. In 2009, there was a strong undersea earthquake measuring 8.3, which, in turn, caused a tsunami. As a result of this tsunami, a large number of villages were destroyed.

 

18. Over the past two centuries, at least 35 volcanic eruptions have occurred on the islands of Tonga, the last was in 1960.

 

19. The highest point in the Kingdom is an unnamed place on the island of Kao, towering 1033 meters above sea level.

 

 

20. The climate on the islands of Tonga has two distinct seasons - dry and rainy. As for the average annual temperature, it is around 26 degrees Celsius.

 

21. The Tonga archipelago has two national parks and six reserves.

 

22. Tonga has two official languages ​​- English and Tongan. But in practice, few people here speak and understand English.

 

23. Most Tongans are very religious people. The official religion of the kingdom is Christianity.

 

24. There are some diplomatic missions on the territory of the Kingdom of Tonga.

 

25. The Kingdom of Tonga maintains diplomatic relations with many countries.

 

26. The economy of this state is based on agriculture. Agriculture is the driving force in the country. The main export commodities that bring the greatest income to the country's budget are beans, coconuts, bananas, corn, breadfruit, limes, and pineapples.

 

27. In addition to these products, Tonga also exports timber, animal meat and fish.

 

 

28. Most of the produce grown is consumed by the Tongans, while the rest is exported to the United States of America, New Zealand, Japan and Australia.

 

29. The country also imports products from countries such as Australia, Singapore, USA, Fiji and New Zealand.

 

30. There are no railways in Tonga.

 

31. Hard-surfaced roads in Tonga are only about two hundred kilometers long.

 

32. The total length of roads in Tonga is about seven hundred kilometers.

 

33. There are only a few car rentals in the country.

 

34. There is only one international airport here. Flights from Tonga are only available from Fiji, New Zealand and Australia.

 

35. The crime rate in Tonga tends to zero, as in other small island countries like Niue or Kiribati.

 

 

36. Like many other island nations lost in the ocean, Tonga is experiencing problems with fresh water. Tongans collect rainwater in special tanks.

 

37. This country is home to the so-called "disappearing" island of Fonuafoʻou. This is an underwater volcano, which throughout history has repeatedly “peeped out” of the water, and then plunged back in the same way.

 

38. Between 1781 and 1865, shallow water formed near the volcano. In 1867, he already looked out from under the water. By 1885, it had risen to a height of 50 meters above sea level (at its highest point), and reached a length of 2 kilometers. Then the leadership of the state announced that they had a new island, Fonuafoʻou. However, after a few decades, he again disappeared under water. Two years later, Fonuafo'u reappeared, and its peak point reached 320 meters.

 

39. The government organized an expedition and wanted to plant the flag of Tonga there and plant some palm trees, but after the volcanic eruption, the island submerged again. Until 1927, he was under water. Then it appeared and existed until 1949, after which it again plunged under water. She reappeared in 1954 and sank again in 1959. Today it is under water at -17 meters above sea level.

 

40. The Tongan armed forces took part in the First World War, as well as in the peacekeeping operation in Iraq.

 

 

41. Bats are sacred animals in Tonga. These are the property of the monarchy and they are protected by law. Therefore, it is forbidden to harm them or use them as pets on the islands. Thanks to this policy, the islands of Tonga are an ideal place for these mammals.

 

42. The only embassy of Tonga is located in China, in Beijing.

 

43. In addition to the danger posed by the Pacific Ring of Fire, Tonga also faces a major sea level rise problem. While some parts of the country are quite high above sea level and protected by mountainous terrain, others, flat areas with relatively low altitude, may be flooded in the near future.

 

44. Grocery stores in Tonga do not have as much variety as one might expect, canned goods of all kinds predominate here. Affects the remoteness from civilization.

 

45. The national sport in Tonga is rugby.

 

46. ​​The Tongan currency is called paanga. In everyday life, it is sometimes called the Tongan dollar.

 

47. Five radio stations broadcast throughout the kingdom.

 

 

48. The land area of ​​the kingdom increases from time to time due to volcanic activity, as a result of which new islands rise to the surface of the ocean.

 

49. The islands of Tonga were practically unknown in the world. Even most people on Earth did not even know about the existence of such a state. Recently, they have been gaining popularity, especially among eco-tourists and downshifters.

 

50. Many tourists come to this country to swim with humpback whales. Every year from June to October, whales make an amazing journey of 5,000 kilometers from Antarctica to the warm waters of Tonga. They return to Tonga to breed. After their cubs get stronger, the whales return back.

 

 

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35-interesting-facts-about-the-bahamas-that-you-need-to-know-this-summer

The official name of this state is the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The country is located in the Atlantic Ocean southeast of the Florida peninsula. The Bahamas is one of the most popular tourist resorts in the world; tourism profits account for more than half of the state's GDP. Every year, the number of tourists visiting these islands is many times greater than the number of local residents.

 

Facts about the Bahamas

 

The archipelago includes more than 700 islands, but only a small part of them (about 30) has a permanent population. The total area of ​​all the islands is about 14,000 square kilometers, and the population is almost 400,000 people. It is assumed that the first Indian settlements were founded in the 9th century, and the first Europeans visited here in 1492. It was an expedition led by Christopher Columbus.

 

 

1. For a long time, the Bahamas were a colony of Great Britain, they received independence only on July 10, 1973. Currently, the Bahamas are a constitutional monarchy, the head of state is the Queen of England, who is represented on the islands by the Governor General. Residents of the Bahamas are not subject to income tax.

 

2. Gambling business brings a solid income to the state treasury, there are many casinos on the islands that were opened here in the late sixties, when the Bahamas were a colony of Britain. For a long time, only foreigners were allowed to enter the casino; local residents were forbidden to visit such establishments. The restrictions were only lifted in 2013. They tried to organize a National Lottery for local residents, but it was not particularly popular with the islanders.

 

3. Currently, more than 80 percent of the local population are descendants of Africans. The standard of living here is quite high, the Bahamas are even called "Caribbean Switzerland". The average life expectancy in this country is 71 years, and literacy is 96 percent. The annual population growth is more than 2,000 people.

 

4. Eternal summer reigns in the Bahamas, which attracts tourists from all over the world all year round. George Washington, who visited here at one time, called the Bahamas "the islands of eternal June." But, on January 17, 1977, an amazing event was recorded on the island of Grand Bahama - snow fell here. But not many people managed to admire this unexpected natural phenomenon, the snow melted almost instantly.

 

 

5. New Providence Island is not even in the top ten of the Bahamas in terms of territory, it covers an area of ​​​​207 square kilometers. However, almost 70 percent of the entire population of the country lives here. The capital of the Bahamas, the city of Nassau, is also located here. Not far from the city is the largest international airport in the Bahamas, where tourists arrive from the USA, Great Britain, Canada and the Caribbean.

 

6. On one of the islands of the archipelago live pigs that willingly swim in the sea. They spend a lot of time in the water, swim up to tourists in anticipation of food. Many legends are connected with their appearance on the island. According to one of them, sailors brought the pigs here, but did not have time to eat them all, and the remaining individuals bred. According to other information, the pigs got to the island on their own from a wrecked ship near the island.

 

 

7. There are no railways in the Bahamas, this is due to the small area of ​​\u200b\u200bmost of the islands. The main means of transportation in the Bahamas is a car. The total length of highways is about 3,000 kilometers. Most of them are privately owned. Traffic here is on the left.

 

8. At one time, the Bahamas were a haven for pirates who traded in the Caribbean. At the beginning of the 18th century, they were expelled by the British, at which time the Caribbean became an English colony. But, until now, there are rumors about countless treasures that were buried by sea robbers on the island of Andros. Many tourists visit the island not only to relax, but also try to find pirate treasures.

 

9. The most popular seafood is on Sink Island.

 

 

10. The population lives on only 30 of the total number of 700 islands in the Bahamas. New Providence is an inhabited island in the Bahamas with a population of over two hundred thousand.

 

11. While the country is driving on the left, it is surprising to find some cars steering on the left and others on the right.

 

12. The Bahamas is one of two countries whose official name begins with the word "the".

 

13. The Bahamas are right on the edge of the infamous Bermuda Triangle.

 

14. The Bahamas have a wonderful underwater cave system. The sea was low 250 feet from its current level during the Ice Age. Acid rain eroded the limestone on the island and led to the formation of vertical and horizontal caves.

 

15. On October 12, 1492, Christopher Columbus is believed to have landed on the island.

 

 

16. The slave trade was the main economic enterprise on the island after the departure of the first royal governor of the island, Captain Woodes Rogers. Slavery ended in the island nation in 1838.

 

17. "Linden V" became the country's first prime minister after independence on July 10, 1973.

 

18. During the 1980s, the island became a notorious destination for the drug trade. Almost 90% of the cocaine reportedly entered the US through the Bahamas.

 

19. "Hubert Ingraham" became Prime Minister of the Bahamas in 1992 and served another consecutive term in his chair. During his administration, he noted the creation of jobs and the economic development of the country.

 

20. The Bahamas signed the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) on February 4, 2005.

 

21. There is no railway on the island, and the road network on the larger islands extends over 2,693 km of roads.

 

 

22. Hurricane Floyd caused significant damage to the island, and the country fell into decline in tourism.

 

23. 2004 - and another ferocious hurricane hit the Bahamas: Hurricane Francis, which causes widespread harm to the living and non-living.

 

24. The case has not yet been settled, and they saw another monster hurricane on the island; tearing up houses, uprooting trees, throwing up cars and smashing houses. However, the island is ready to shine again and come back as strong as it needs to be to forget the pain and destruction caused by a natural disaster.

 

25. The Bahamas and an import-oriented economy. However, significant tourism activity and government-provided financial services bring in a lot of foreign exchange to balance the economy. According to the CIA, the economy of the Bahamas is developing and stable.

 

26. The Bahamas have the world's third largest shipping registry.

 

 

27. There is only one stock exchange in the Bahamas, the Bahamas International Stock Exchange (BISX).

 

28. There is no income or sales tax for residents of The Bahamas. Most government revenue comes from tariffs and import charges.

 

29. The Government of The Bahamas provides maternity assistance for every live birth and a 13-week maternity benefit.

 

30. Tourism makes up about 40-45% of the country's economy. It has beautiful beaches, flora, fauna and many recreational and resort facilities.

 

31. Gambling is legal for non-Bahamians who visit the Bahamas.

 

32. A tourist from the US and Canada is not required to carry a passport to the Bahamas for a stay of less than three weeks. Every year, millions of visitors to the country spend billions of dollars. The average cost of staying on the island per day varied depending on the time of year and location. You can expect to spend between $30 and $400 a day during your visit to the island.

 

 

33. The Bahamian dollar is equal to the US dollar and you can easily use US dollars throughout the island as they are freely accepted as cash. However, the United States does not accept Bahamian dollars at its counters. You will have to exchange currency or spend it in the Bahamas before leaving the country.

 

34. More than 90% of Bahamians are followers of Christianity. However, there are also spiritists who worship various spirits, and even followers of the voodoo cult. They are mainly immigrants from Haiti and some African countries, as well as their descendants. However, followers of various religions in the Bahamas get along peacefully, and there are no conflicts on this basis.

 

35. The Bahamas is home to the world's largest colony of pink flamingos, birds that everyone knows. On the island of Big Inagua, which is part of the archipelago, there are about 50,000 of these amazing birds.

 

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60-amazing-facts-about-new-caledonia

If there is a truly heavenly spot on Earth, it is probably located in New Caledonia. At least that's what those who have been here are saying. And it's hard to argue with this - magnificent beaches, snow-white yachts swaying on azure waves. In addition, serene calm always reigns here, not interrupted by various events that periodically shake the world political arena.

 

Amazing facts about New Caledonia

 

Even though New Caledonia is located in the Pacific Ocean, de jure, it is considered an overseas department of France. And, like other former French colonies that never gained independence, this country primarily exists thanks to the financial support of the metropolis. It is not so easy for the French to move here to live because they will not receive any social benefits here. The French authorities decided to cut off the flow of their citizens who wanted to wallow on New Caledonian beaches, do nothing and live on welfare.

 

1. New Caledonia is located in the southwestern part of the Pacific Ocean, in Melanesia.

 

2. This country is one large island in the Pacific Ocean, including a relatively small island group.

 

3. New Caledonia is a particular administrative-territorial entity of France.

 

4. About a quarter of the New Caledonian population are Europeans, primarily French.

 

5. New Caledonia consists of the leading and most significant island, Grande Ter, and several other smaller islands.

 

6. The total area of ​​the New Caledonia archipelago is 19,060 km². This can be compared to the size of ​​Wales.

 

 

7. The famous navigator James Cook first discovered these islands for Europeans.

 

8. Therefore, the island got its name in honor of Caledonia, an area located in Scotland, which was the birthplace of Captain Cook.

 

9. From the nearest giant neighbor, Australia, New Caledonia is separated by 1200 kilometers.

 

10 ... According to scientists, New Caledonia separated from Australia about 66 million years ago.

 

11. Then, for 16 million years, the archipelago drifted in a northeasterly direction until it reached its current position about 50 million years ago.

 

12. The first people appeared here about 3.5 thousand years ago. After the discovery of this archipelago by Cook, British whalers and sandalwood traders soon began to appear there.

 

13. The influx of foreigners brought trade and many diseases that the indigenous population first encountered. Leprosy, smallpox and dysentery led to the mass extinction of the indigenous people.

 

14. As trade in this place expanded, so did the number of missions, which further eradicated local customs and traditions.

 

 

15. The French arrived on the island's territory in 1843 under the pretext of protecting the indigenous population and made it their colony in 1853.

 

16. But the French needed New Caledonia only to counteract British influence in this region.

 

17. New Caledonia was a French colony from 1853 until the end of the 1980s.

 

18. In 1988, the Matignon Accords were signed, according to which the archipelago gained independence but remained under the strong influence of France.

 

19. The former colonialist retained his powers in defense, currency, public order, justice, and foreign affairs.

 

20. Despite the new status, New Caledonia depends on France. More than 50% of this country's income is subsidies from France.

 

21. Europeans first settled in New Caledonia when France established a colony there. In the 19th century, the French sent former prisoners there and gave them land there to farm and build houses.

 

22. Now, out of 278,500 people in New Caledonia, about 30% have French roots.

 

 

23. Of the entire population of the whole country - a little more than a quarter of a million people, about a hundred thousand live in the capital city of Noumea.

 

24. And about 40% of the local population are Kanaks, representatives of one of the peoples of Melanesia. However, their culture practically disappeared under the influence of France. Even the purely Kanak villages here are more like European than Pacific settlements.

 

25. In 2018, a referendum was organized on the independence of New Caledonia from France, resulting in the overwhelming majority of voters opposing independence.

 

26. The local currency is called the French Pacific franc. In addition to New Caledonia, this currency is circulated on the Wallis, Futuna Islands, and French Polynesia.

 

27. French traditions are decisive here. This manifests itself in architecture, local food, and croissants. But this does not surprise anyone since New Caledonia is an overseas possession of France.

 

28. Not surprisingly, the official language of New Caledonia is French.

 

 

29. Although the locals speak 30 Melanesian and Polynesian languages ​​and dialects.

 

30. Of course, most of the population speaks French. New Caledonia. But Indonesian, Vietnamese, Tahitian, Welsh, and Chinese are among the archipelago's 30 most widely spoken languages ​​.

 

31. Since most of the country's population is fluent in two languages, French and one of the 30 most common languages.

 

32. But most people here do not speak English. Tourists must learn French if they desire to feel comfortable while relaxing in New Caledonia.

 

33. Most citizens of New Caledonia identify themselves as Catholics.

 

34. Almost 97% of the local population is literate, which is a high rate for countries in Oceania.

 

35. Education in New Caledonia is free and compulsory for children between 6 and 16. Primary education lasts five years. Secondary education is divided into two cycles: the first last four years, and the second - is three years.

 

 

36. If Caledonian citizens wished to obtain a higher education, they did not have to travel abroad. There are five higher educational institutions in the country.

 

37. Education in New Caledonia is based on the French curriculum provided by French and French-trained teachers.

 

38. The national flag of New Caledonia is a rectangular panel with three stripes: blue, red, and green. The blue stripe symbolizes the sky and the ocean. Red is the blood that the patriots shed in the fight for freedom. The red color also represents collectivism. Green is the color of ancestors.

 

39. Besides the three stripes, the flag has a yellow circle with a spire inside. The ring symbolizes the sun. It became the national flag in July 2010. Before that, it was used as a regional flag, France's national flag.

 

40. The Kanaks, the indigenous people of the archipelago, have long cultivated yams, Talos (potato-like roots), bananas, and sweet potatoes. Until recently, these products were the main ones in their diet. Also, bats were used as Kanaka meat. Now, these products are leaving their table, replaced by rice (instead of yams and that), frozen foods, beef, pork, and lamb.

 

41. Noumea, the capital of New Caledonia, was built by French colonists and was practically the only major city. About 90% of the population lives in the money, which does not have indigenous roots.

 

 

42. The climate here is tropical. There are two seasons: hot and humid and dry and cool. Hot and humid last from November to March. The average temperature is kept within 27-30 degrees Celsius. And the dry and cool season lasts from June to August when the average air temperature reaches 20-23 degrees Celsius.

 

43. Here in the central mountain range, the highest peaks are Mont Panier (height 1629 meters), located in the north, and Mont Humboldt (elevation 1618 meters), located in the southeast.

 

44. Despite the compact size of the country's main island, about 3,000 different plant species grow on it.

 

45. And forests cover about 15% of all New Caledonia.

 

46. ​​Large tracts of forest have been preserved in the vicinity of Jensen. Severe rocks, framed by picturesque waterfalls, break through the green cover.

 

47. Near Yengen, there is “the most picturesque cliff in the country” - the “black rocks” Linderalik and Mount Pani. In the town itself, it is worth getting acquainted with the Goa-Ma-Bwarhat Cultural Center - a venue for folklore performances.

 

 

48. New Caledonia is a unique oasis of Pacific flora and fauna. The archipelago is surrounded by the most significant 1600 km reef barrier in Oceania, forming a relatively closed ecosystem.

 

49. For 300 million years, the islands were completely isolated from the rest of the world; this explains the vast number of endemics, especially in the plant world - about 2,500 unique plants make New Caledonia the "first botanical garden" of the entire South Pacific region.

 

50. The pride of the Caledonian flora is Amborella Trihopoda, the "mother of flowers" on our planet.

 

51. The animal world here is not very diverse. Only a few species of bats lived in New Caledonia even before the advent of Europeans, deer, and wild pigs, and there are no other mammals. Also, there are no poisonous snakes or frogs.

 

52. Several species of scorpions and centipedes can be found on the country's territory. It is also curious that many geckos live on the local islands.

 

53. And up to 100 species of birds are found here, and in New Caledonia, there are 22 species of birds that live only in this region and are not found anywhere else in the world.

 

 

54. Although New Caledonia receives a lot of money from France and tourists, the main contribution to the budget is the extraction of nickel, the rich deposits here. Nickel mining in the archipelago began in 1894.

 

55. Nickel is New Caledonia's main export commodity. According to preliminary estimates, about 25% of its world reserves are in New Caledonia.

 

56. Horse racing is popular in New Caledonia, as is women's cricket.

 

57. The visa regime here is quite strict. For example, even holders of French passports must come to terms with the fact that their stay on the island is limited.

 

 

58. Salaries here are much higher than in other Pacific countries. Prices, by the way, too.

 

59. New Caledonia is a hospitable country with gourmet food under palm trees, white sand, chic resorts, and bungalows. If there is a truly heavenly spot on Earth, it is probably located in New Caledonia. At least that's what those who have been here are saying.

 

60. magnificent beaches and snow-white yachts are swaying on the azure waves. In addition, serene calm always reigns here, not interrupted by various events that periodically shake the world political arena.

 

 

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60-interesting-facts-about-the-country-of-oman

The Sultanate of Oman is an Arab state located southeast of the Arabian Peninsula. It has a hot climate and wealth, like other oil countries. Officially, the Sultanate of Oman was founded relatively recently, only in 1970, but people have been living here for a long time, and once these lands were part of the Arab Caliphate. Today, Oman is a prosperous Arab country with a traditional Arab way of life.

 

The Sultanate of Oman- exciting facts

 

Oman is a typical Arab state, small but prosperous due to the deposits of natural resources found on these lands. True, oil is not endless, and today the government of Oman is already beginning to seek new sources of income so that the country does not go bankrupt when the oil runs out.

 

 

1. The Sultanate of Oman is an Arab state.

 

2. Oman is located in the southeast of the Arabian Peninsula.

 

3. Oman is a typical Arab state, small but prosperous.

 

4. The country of Oman became rich thanks to the deposits of natural resources found in these lands.

 

5. Of course, oil is not endless, and now the government of Oman is starting to look for new sources of income so that the country does not go bankrupt when the oil runs out.

 

6. Officially, the Sultanate of Oman was founded relatively recently, only in 1970, but people have been living here for a long time, and once these lands were part of the Arab Caliphate.

 

7. Scientists suggest that in ancient times, the main route for the settlement of people from Africa to different parts of Asia ran through the coast of Oman.

 

8. Oman is, in fact, the only country in the Middle East that has miraculously preserved its Arab identity and, at the same time, a high standard of living for the population.

 

 

9. Oman is an absolute monarchy, where the sultan is not a decorative figure but the natural leader of the country and head of government. He also heads the Ministry of Defense, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Ministry of Finance.

 

10. After the death of the Sultan, the ruling family of Oman must, within three days, decide on the candidacy of his successor. If this does not happen, the relatives open the letter of the late ruler with his recommendations regarding the heir to the throne.

 

11. In many ways, Oman resembles Bahrain.

 

12. The only major city in Oman is its capital, the city of Muscat. All other towns are pretty small.

 

13. Muscat is the capital of Oman, a small town it stretches for 30 kilometers along the coast. The building is mostly low-rise. Offices rarely exceed 9-10 floors. Muscat is the best place to live with your family in the Arabian Peninsula.

 

14. The country has a hot climate. Oman receives very little rainfall, and in some regions of the country, it rains only a few times a year.

 

15. There is not a single permanent river in Oman - they all dry up in the summer.

 

 

16. You can swim on the coast of Oman all year round. Here the water is always warm.

 

17. Oman has excellent diving. The water is warm and crystal clear. You can see sharks, barracudas, moray eels, rays, and turtles. I'm not talking about ordinary colored fish. During the season, you can see whales and whale sharks. Corals start right from the shore.

 

18. There is a theory that Oman was covered with forests several millennia ago, but all the forests were cut down due to active copper mining. Because of this, there was a rapid desertification of the area.

 

19. Oman is a highly law-abiding country. Even a domestic fight is impossible to see here. After all, such a violation of the order here is supposed to be a prison sentence.

 

20. Oman suffers from a lack of fresh water, so the country's authorities have to desalinate the salty sea water.

 

21. One of the most popular places in Oman are incense markets.

 

 

22. In the south of Oman, there is a population with Ethiopian roots, and even the local dialect is more like Ethiopian than Arabic.

 

23. In Oman, teaching the basics of Islam is a compulsory school subject.

 

24. An obligatory detail of the Omani man's costume is a short broad dagger.

 

25. Among Omani women, blue tattoos on the face and hands and earrings in the ears and nose are common.

 

26. In Oman, unlike other countries of the Persian Gulf, nature is very picturesque: tropics, savannahs, fjords, waterfalls, and mountains.

 

27. On the west coast of Oman, there is one of the few places in the world where green turtles come to lay their eggs.

 

 

28. Due to the heat and hot air, the sky over Oman almost always looks gray. Blue skies can only be seen during the cool season.

 

29. Because of the rain in Oman, for example, classes at school may well be canceled.

 

30. In Oman, alcoholic products are sold only in specialized stores. But to purchase alcohol, you must first obtain permission from the police, and Muslims do not receive such permission.

 

31. There is almost no public transport in Oman - only fixed-route taxis, but only Indians use them. For some reason, this is not an option for white people.

 

32. Taxis that travel around the city, as a rule, also carry Indians.

 

33. A more or less decent taxi can only be taken from the hotel and the shopping center. A brand new taxi is now running from the airport. All cars are new, business class.

 

34. The national currency of Oman is the Omani rial. It is heavily pegged to the dollar. One rial costs a little less than three dollars.

 

 

35. Crime, unemployment and poverty are virtually absent in Oman.

 

36. The door of the National Bank of Oman is cast from pure gold.

 

37. Residents of Oman are exempt from paying taxes.

 

38. One of the national musical instruments of the Omanis is the rabab violin with a single string.

 

39. Gasoline in Oman is very cheap, but of poor quality due to its high sulfur content.

 

40. The favorite delicacy of the inhabitants of Oman is hyena meat. Addiction to this food is not found in any other country in the Arab world.

 

41. The government of Oman has approved a list of 26 professions that are not available to foreigners. For example, taxi drivers can only be Omanis by nationality.

 

42. Tourists were allowed to enter Oman only in the late 1980s.

 

 

43. The fabulous merchant and traveler Sinbad the Sailor was from Oman.

 

44. Car tires on Omani cars crack from the heat in a few years. Tire fitting here, apparently, is a very profitable business.

 

45. A lot of roads are being built in Oman. Many highways are expanding. Due to mild climatic conditions, all roads are in excellent condition.

 

46. ​​There are no traffic jams anywhere in Oman, even in the capital, Muscat. Any part of the city can be reached in 20-25 minutes.

 

47. In Oman, it is not customary to show bare heels in public, as the locals consider it disrespectful.

 

48. In Oman there is a sandy Wahiba desert with huge sand dunes tens of kilometers high in a multi-storey building.

 

49. There is a real cave with stalactites and stalagmites 200 kilometers from the city of Muscat.

 

50. Children studying in foreign / European schools receive a fairly decent education, they then easily enter European and American institutions. And local schools and universities are of a low level.

 

 

51. In Oman, it is impossible to buy such familiar food as sausage. Products that religion does not allow Muslims to consume, such as pork, are very expensive in Oman, because only visitors buy them.

 

52. Residents of Oman on average give birth to 5-6 children.

 

53. Entertainment in Oman is varied. You can find something for every taste: you can go to a bar, to the mall, to the cinema or to the beach. There is also something to do: golf, diving or karting.

 

54. In Oman, the days off are Thursday and Friday.

 

55. Residents of Oman are not very interested in work - about 70% of the labor force in the country are foreigners. The same situation is observed in Qatar.

 

56. Omanis have the right to free healthcare, education (including in foreign universities) and land to build a house.

 

 

57. Only 0.2% of Omani consider themselves atheists. Although Oman is a noticeably less religiously radical country than neighboring Arab states.

 

58. Oman is considered a young country.

 

59. Thanks to the discovery of rich oil reserves, in 30 years Oman has turned from a run-down state with medieval orders and infrastructure into one of the economic leaders of the modern world.

 

60. Now Oman is a prosperous Arab country with a traditional Arab way of life.

 

 

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70-facts-about-macedonia-that-you-didnt-know

Interesting facts about Macedonia are an excellent opportunity to learn more about the Balkan countries. Today, this state cannot boast a strong economy and influence on the world stage. However, the government had significant political and military power in ancient times.

 

The Republic of Macedonia is a state in southeastern Europe on the Balkan Peninsula. Member of the UN as the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

 

Interesting facts about Macedonia

 

 

1. Macedonia is a country located south of the Balkan Peninsula.

 

2. Macedonia is a small European state located on the Balkan Peninsula, bordering Kosovo, Serbia, Bulgaria, Albania, and Greece.

 

3. There are several Macedonias: the Pirin is a region in southwestern Bulgaria, Aegean is a region in northern Greece, and Vardar partly belongs to Serbia.

 

4. The modern state of the Republic of Macedonia is located between all these countries. It occupies an area historically called Vardar Macedonia - after the name of the Vardar River.

 

5. Macedonia is the only country that gained independence from Yugoslavia peacefully. It became a separate state in 1991

 

6. Although Macedonia is now a very small state, it used to be the greatest empire that conquered most of the world.

 

7. This is one of the oldest settlements in Europe. The first settlements on the territory of this country date back to 5000 BC. However, the first traces of organized cities date back to 808 BC, when the Argead dynasty controlled the area.

 

8. The name of the country comes from the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedonia, which was named after the ancient Macedonians. The name Μακεδόνες (Makedónes) comes from the ancient Greek adjective μακεδνός (makednós), which literally translates as "high". Perhaps the Macedonians got this name because of their physical characteristics, or their mountainous habitats.

 

 

9. More than five centuries, until 1912, Macedonia was part of the Ottoman Empire. Therefore, some local traditions, dishes and even music are reminiscent of Turkish ones.

 

10. The Macedonians have always wanted to gain independence, so they often heroically rebelled against the Turks.

 

11. In memory of one heroic uprising, a huge monument was erected - “Macedonium” in the city of Krushevo, where the Ilinden uprising broke out in 1903, as a result of which the Krushevo Republic was created. The republic did not last long - ten days later the Turks dispersed this uprising, killing all the revolutionaries. The revolutionaries became heroes, their names are heard in the national anthem, and August 2 (Ilya according to the church calendar, “Ilinden”) is celebrated on a grand scale every year.

 

12. After the fall of the Ottoman Empire, Macedonia did not have statehood, and its fate was decided by its neighbors, who defeated the Turks in the First Balkan War and then quarreled with each other.

 

13.Macedonia is the second most mountainous country in the world. About 85% of the territory of this state is covered with mountains. It is second only to Montenegro, whose territory is 89% mountains.

 

14. There are 34 mountains in the country, the height of each of which exceeds 2000 meters above sea level.

 

 

15. Macedonia is a country with a territory of 26 thousand km2, and a population of just over two million people, of which about 500 thousand live in the capital, Skopje.

 

16. The city of Skopje has experienced many devastating earthquakes throughout its history. The most serious earthquakes occurred in 518 and 1963. These earthquakes almost completely destroyed the city.

 

17. Now Skopje has been completely restored and has the unofficial name of the "city of monuments", since on its territory there are monuments at almost every step.

 

18. In Skopje, there is the Church of the Holy Savior with a unique iconostasis dating back to the 6th century.

 

19. Skopje is a city where it is colder in winter than in the rest of Macedonia, and hotter in summer. Macedonia has a warm and dry climate, with 300 sunny days a year. In winter, the temperature is not lower than -5, usually from 0 to +5, in summer - +25+35, sometimes up to +40. If there is a thunderstorm, lightning is sure to strike.

 

20. In the mountains of Macedonia it is colder and there is snow. Ski resorts: Mavrovo, Krushevo, Popova Shapka. The Mavrovo National Park is open to tourists in the summer as well.

 

 

21. In the mountainous northwestern regions of Macedonia, there are quite large areas of forest vegetation. The lower slopes are dominated by deciduous forests. At altitudes up to 2000 meters above sea level, coniferous forests predominate.

 

22. These forests are home to a large number of wild animals such as wild pigs, wolves, bears, lynxes and others.

 

23. About 67% of the inhabitants of Macedonia are Orthodox Christians, 30% are Muslims.

 

24. Orthodox Macedonian ancestors were Slavs who, as the local history textbook says, came from beyond the Carpathians in the 6th-7th centuries AD. e.

 

25. Macedonians speak Macedonian. There is such a language. Everyone understands and freely communicates with Serbs, Croats, Montenegrins, Bulgarians, these are different languages, but they are similar. The younger generation in the cities speaks English. The older generation once learned Russian at school, but, as a rule, no one remembers anything.

 

26. Despite the modest size of the country, there are many different dialects of Macedonian, which can be very different from the literary one.

 

28. Formal languages ​​such as Greek and Church Slavonic were often used for writing by these people. The Macedonian alphabet was created only in 1945.

 

29.Now the Macedonian language is one of the most difficult languages ​​to learn.

 

 

30. Macedonia is a predominantly agricultural country, fully self-sufficient in food. The main crops grown in this country are tobacco, fruits (mainly apples and grapes), various vegetables, wheat, rice and corn. Viticulture is quite developed in Macedonia.

 

31. Here everywhere, among the hills and low mountains, along the valleys and along the roads, fields and vineyards stretch.

 

32. Ohrid is a small town in the southwest of the country. There are 365 churches in this city (one for each day of the year). Several of these churches have been abandoned, but Ohrid is still the city with the largest number of churches, if not in the world then at least in Europe.

 

33. August 26, 1910 in Skopje was born Agnes Gonje Boyadjiiu, who is now known to the whole world as Mother Teresa. Today, in the center of the capital, you can visit her house-museum.

 

34. At 30 kilometers from the city of Kumanovo, at an altitude of 1030 meters, there is the oldest observatory in the world - Kukino. Its age is about 4 thousand years. This is the most important archaeological site discovered in Macedonia.

 

35. The Millennium Cross in Skopje is the highest in the world. It has a height of 66 meters and is located on the top of Mount Vodno (1066 meters). It was built for the 2000th anniversary of Christianity in Macedonia.

 

36. Macedonia is landlocked, but has many lakes, of which the most famous is Lake Ohrid.

 

37. Lake Ohrid is the oldest and deepest in the Balkans, it is located at an altitude of 750 meters above sea level, a depth of about 300 meters, according to scientists, it is about five million years old. Also, more than 200 endemic species of animals live in Lake Ohrid.

 

 

38. The water in Lake Ohrid is very clean. Wastewater is not drained into it, even the river that flows into the lake is cleaned of debris before that.

 

39. The waters of the Crni Drin River, which flows into Lake Ohrid, do not mix with the waters of the lake, and from a height you can see how it flows through the turquoise water with a black ribbon and flows out from the opposite side.

 

40. The city of Ohrid, on which the lake is located, is famous for the first Slavic university, a large number of churches, a beautiful monastery that rises above the water, and an ancient amphitheater. The city of Ohrid and its lake were included in the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1980.

 

41. Every wealthy Macedonian has a house or apartment in Ohrid, where they come for the weekend, but they prefer to spend their holidays in Montenegro or Greece, because the sea is warmer than the lake.

 

42. Ohrid resembles the Adriatic coast: a beautiful promenade, many restaurants and hotels. The beaches are located outside the city. There are sun loungers for vacationers by the water, restaurants and cafes right behind them, modern toilets are equipped every 50 meters, which have never been paid. Sun loungers are also free, you just need to order drinks in a cafe. There are wild beaches, but they are unpopular.

 

43. Local residents are very friendly. They are very fond of tourists. Many offer accommodation to tourists. Others take tourists on a boat. Souvenirs, soda, baked corn, glazed donuts, books, antiques are sold on the embankment.

 

 

44. Many Germans, Belgians, Swiss, Danes, tourists from the Baltic countries and Scandinavia.

 

45.After Macedonia became an independent country in 1991, the small village of Vevkani, located in the mountains north of Lake Ohrid, declared itself the first micronation in the Balkan Peninsula, even though the inhabitants of Vevkani were all ethnic Macedonians. The inhabitants of this village had their own flag and currency, but the so-called "republic" did not last long.

 

46. ​​In this state there is a system of caves Vrelo, located near Skopje, the depth of which reaches 230 meters. These are currently the deepest caves in the Balkans and the second deepest in Europe.

 

47. Alexander the Great was an ancient Macedonian, not a Greek. The Greeks even refused him participation in the Olympic Games, referring to the fact that only Greeks have the right to take part.

 

48. The Greeks managed to force the Macedonians to change their coat of arms, arrogating to themselves the rights to the "Sun of Alexander". But the patriots still decorate their premises and even make tattoos with the coat of arms and various phrases, the meaning of which is: “we will die, but we will not change our name.”

 

49. In the center of Skopje, a huge monument to Alexander the Great was recently erected, but in order not to anger the Greeks, they called it “Warrior on Horseback”.

 

50. In the city of Bitola, the ruins of Heraclea, the palace of Philip II, the father of Alexander the Great, have been preserved.

 

 

51. Very often in this country, the construction of any object, house or garage is interrupted due to an accidental important find and archaeological excavations begin instead. There is even a joke like this: “Don’t piss me off, otherwise I’ll plant an amphora in your garden, and in the morning you will receive archaeologists.”

 

52. Macedonians are very patriotic citizens. Each house has a flag, souvenirs or clothing with national symbols, they love their cuisine, music, football team and believe that everything Macedonian is the best.

 

53. 20:00 - time for the evening news, all of Macedonia falls to the TV screens. The population is especially happy about news from other countries with the mention of Macedonia, even if someone just found their state on the map.

 

54. Macedonians make unique blankets from sheep's wool, which look like the skin of a bear, they are called yamboli. They are painted in different colors and laid on the sofa, and when the yambolia wears out, they are thrown on the floor instead of a rug.

 

55.There are three types of popular music in Macedonia: folk popular music, popular music and children's music.

 

56. Macedonian folk music is very patriotic, reminiscent of the wedding music of Western Ukrainians and Moldovans.

 

57. The children's stage consists of several festivals where children of different ages perform, all this is shown on local television. Thus, children have their own, children's idols, favorite songs on children's topics.

 

 

58. The city of Struga every year becomes the venue for poetry evenings, which attract poets from all over the world.

 

59. The city of Prilep is known for its summer beer festival, where Balkan pop stars perform.

 

60. Socialism in Yugoslavia differed significantly from the Soviet one, land was not taken away from people, private enterprise was allowed. In Macedonia, many family businesses were inherited by the current owners from their grandfather-great-grandfather, these are all sorts of workshops, vineyards, shops, as well as land.

 

61. In central Macedonia, growing tobacco has been a popular form of income since the 18th century. They collect it, string it on long needles, then on threads two meters long and dry it on the street, after which they keep it in the attic until winter, and in winter they rent it to a tobacco factory. This is very hard work. All family members are involved in this work, starting from the age of 4-5.

 

62. Macedonians grow more than 40 types of peppers of different sizes, colors, shapes, tastes and pungency. It can be said that this is one of the main food products along with wheat, feta cheese and tomatoes.

 

63. There is no buckwheat and herring in Macedonia. Herring in Macedonians is disgusting.

 

64. In the mountains of Macedonia there are villages where there are thousands of times more sheep than people.

 

 

65. There are deposits of marble in Macedonia. Whole marble mountains. Therefore, the completely marble central square of a small town is not uncommon, here it is not expensive. In the process of marble extraction, a lot of marble scrap remains - curved slabs of different sizes, marble chips. Local residents lay out their yards with slabs; you can often find an ordinary house with a beautiful marble yard.

 

66.The Macedonian diaspora exceeds the population of the country itself. Most Macedonians live in the USA, Australia, Belgium, Denmark, Italy, Germany. They emigrated in several waves, starting from the 19th century, fleeing poverty and Ottoman oppression.

 

67. Foreign Macedonians, as they are called in the country, come to their homeland regularly, marry the same foreign Macedonians, met “down” (“below”), in their homeland.

 

68. Macedonians will proudly show a foreigner their house, their neighbor’s house, the city, and the history of the country, and all this with pride.

 

69. They treat Russians with respect. Russians consider all citizens of the CIS countries. And the Russian mafia scare small naughty children.

 

70. What cannot be expressed in words is the atmosphere in the country. The unhurried pace of life of self-proud Macedonians. Magical sunrises and sunsets against the backdrop of endless mountains. Sweet smells of hot Macedonian summer. Macedonia needs to be felt, and for this you need to come here.

 

 

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top-75-fascinating-facts-about-martinique

Martinique is France's island and overseas territorial community in the eastern Caribbean Sea. It is part of the Lesser Antilles island chain. Its closest neighbors are the island republics of Dominica, 22 miles (35 km) to the northwest, and Saint Lucia, 16 miles (26 km) to the south. Guadeloupe, another part of overseas France, is about 75 miles (120 km) to the north. This island has incredible views and will not leave anyone indifferent to its beaches.

 

Amazing facts about Martinique

 

Travelers are always interested in interesting facts about France and its overseas department - the exotic island of Martinique. Well, this tropical resort has its little secrets!

 

 

1. Martinique is an island country in the Caribbean.

 

2. The island of Martinique belongs to the archipelago of the Lesser Antilles and is located in its central part.

 

3. Martinique is one of the most attractive islands in the Caribbean.

 

4. Beautiful beaches, cozy bays, hilly trekking paths, as well as fantastic vegetation of the tropics along the coast attract many travelers.

 

5. Martinique is located between Saint Lucia and Dominica. On all sides, the island is surrounded by beaches, but if the Caribbean Sea washes Martinique in the west and south, then by the Atlantic Ocean in the east and north.

 

6. Such a geographical location of the island attracts divers and other lovers of active water sports from all over the world.

 

7. Martinique is the most prosperous overseas department of France in the Caribbean. This territory has belonged to France since 1635.

 

8. The island's indigenous population was Caribs, Indians, whose name remained in the toponym "Caribbean Sea."

 

 

9. The island was discovered by Columbus at the end of the 15th century, more precisely, in 1493. It is believed that the history of Martinique begins from this moment.

 

10. Not finding gold on the island, the Spaniards left it. But the Spaniards named Martinique after one of their Catholic saints.

 

11. Since the Spaniards were not interested in the island with beautiful nature, the French subsequently founded the first settlement here.

 

12. In 1635, 90 French settlers founded the fortified Fort Saint-Pierre here, and the French colonization of Martinique began.

 

13. At first, the island was the property of a private company, but then it was bought by the state and from 1664 became the crown colony of France.

 

14. Already by the 60s of the 17th century, the Indian population of Martinique was either exterminated in wars with the French, or died from diseases brought from Europe, so the new landowners began to massively import slaves from Africa.

 

15. It is not surprising that local history is full of a large number of events related to the struggle of slaves for their rights and freedoms. However, slavery was abolished in Martinique only in 1848 - by decree of the Provisional Government of France in the colonies.

 

 

16. In 1870, the population of Martinique received voting rights and representation in the French Parliament.

 

17. And since 1946, Martinique has the status of an overseas department of France (but it is not an independent state, like French Guiana in South America).

 

18. Now Martinique is a wonderful resort with wonderful nature and a highly developed tourist infrastructure.

 

19. At one time, this island was called by Columbus "the most beautiful land in the world."

 

20. Martinique can rightly be called one big resort. There are many first-class hotels, excellent beaches and stunning architecture of the colonial period. All this is the hallmark of the island.

 

21. The largest and highest volcano on the island is Mont Pele, its height is 1397 meters. The name translates as "Bald Mountain". The volcano is located 8 kilometers from Fort Saint-Pierre, which suffered from its eruption over 100 years ago.

 

22. Saint-Pierre, the largest city of the island, was the first capital of Martinique, which was almost completely destroyed by the 1902 eruption of Mont Pele. Now, making tours to Martinique, you can visit Saint-Pierre and see for yourself the destructive power of volcanoes. The local museum of volcanology is open for visiting, the remains of the old theater, the ruins of the city prison and city warehouses are also interesting for tourists.

 

 

23. Nearby is the house-museum of Paul Gauguin, who lived at one time in Martinique. Some of the masterpieces of the world famous French artist Gauguin were painted in Martinique. In the house where the genius lived, a museum is now open, but, unfortunately, there are no originals of his works there.

 

24. The city of Fort-de-France is the modern capital of Martinique. For its architecture and originality, it is often called "Little Paris".

 

25. On the narrow streets of Fort-de-France, coming from the bay de Flamence and the Rivière Madame, there are a large number of mansions of the colonial period, many churches, and a well-developed network of cafes and shops.

 

26. Fort-de-France is also a city of parks. In the center of the city there is a large park La Savane, where there are many beautiful fountains, palm alleys and open areas for concerts.

 

27.From the southeast, the park is adjacent to Fort St. Louis. The streets of the city are narrow, winding, there are many cafes and restaurants, as well as historical and cultural monuments. The city also has a large number of different museums.

 

28. The city of Fort - de - France, the capital of Martinique and at the same time one of the largest ports, where sugar, rum and cocoa beans are exported. It is in this part of the coast that there are bays convenient for navigation - those in which there are no reefs.

 

 

29. There are many reefs around Martinique. This is inconvenient for sailors, but ideal for divers. By the way, the infrastructure for diving and sport fishing is well developed on the local coast.

 

30. Due to volcanic activity, the island has a difficult terrain (for which tours to Martinique are especially respected by fans of hiking trekking) and indented, with a large number of bays, coasts (this makes a beach holiday especially cozy).

 

31. As for the hills, they are mainly represented here by hills, but on the north side there are old volcanoes, the highest of which is almost one and a half kilometers above sea level: this is Mont Pele (which translates as "Bald Mountain"). It was his eruption at the beginning of the twentieth century that destroyed the first capital of Martinique, but since then Mont Pele has been sleeping.

 

32. For Martinique in 1855 - 1961, special monetary units were issued in France, which were in circulation only here. Now on the island - as well as in the metropolis - the euro is used, but in many places in Martinique, US dollars are accepted for payment.

 

33. The cheapest and most common form of transport among the local population is a bus. Here it is called "collective taxi". However, such a “taxi” runs only according to a schedule, and on weekends it is quite rare. Alternatively, you can use a regular taxi, but its cost is much more expensive.

 

34. The "golden mean" for tours of Martinique is car rental. You can rent a car almost everywhere, you only need to have a driver's license from any country in the world. The main thing to remember is that traffic on the island is right-handed!

 

 

35. Lake Etang - de - Saline - this is a great place for lovers of both active and passive recreation. The reservoir is located in the southernmost part of Martinique, 600 meters from the Caribbean Sea, as a result of which its waters are salty. The weather in this area is always sunny and warm. On the lake, you can either just sunbathe or go diving, as the nearby Strait of St. Lucia is rich in its underwater world.

 

36. The southernmost coast of Martinique is the Les Salines peninsula, recognized as the most beautiful place on the island due to its amazing beaches.

 

37. The Strait of St. Lucia, into whose waters Le Saline crashes, is famous for strong currents and a rich underwater world, which cannot but please diving fans.

 

38. The town of Sainte-Anne, which is the peculiar capital of the peninsula, is known for its small but very beautiful Abbey Morland square, a church built of white sandstone, and charming street architecture.

 

39. The Piton du Carbet mountain range is located near the Mont Pele volcano in the northern part of the island of Martinique. Despite the fact that Piton - du - Carbet is of volcanic origin, eruptions have never occurred here.

 

40. The length of the ridge is 80 kilometers, and it includes several peaks. The highest point of the ridge is Mount More - Pavillon, which rises at an altitude of 1197 meters above sea level. This place is perfect for lovers of mountaineering and hiking.

 

 

41. Fans of sea fishing, diving and those who like to just relax on the beach will be interested in the Presqu'il Caravel peninsula, located in the Baye du Gallon. Presqu'il Caravel is widely known for its wild beaches.

 

42. In Martinique, the so-called trekking routes are very popular - hiking along hiking trails. First of all, this is the Route de la Tres, which passes through the rainforest and the slopes of the Piton du Carbet peaks.

 

43. Its second name is the Jesuit trail. It windingly runs from the capital of Martinique - Fort - de - France to the Piton - du - Carbet mountain range. The trail passes between huge volcanic formations, past the church and the Balata botanical garden. Also, in some places, the mountain river Alma flows along it.

 

44. At an altitude of 450 m above sea level, the most famous residential point is located here - the settlement of Mont Rouge. Walking along this path, between fern thickets and palm groves, you can enjoy the beauty of the local nature to the fullest.

 

45. The creation of the beautiful Balata Botanical Garden, famous for its huge variety of flowers, lasted 20 years. Representatives of European flora grow in the garden: pines, orchids, which are perfectly complemented by representatives of the exotic flora: dragon trees, reeds and cordilins. In total, about 3 thousand different types of trees, shrubs and flowers are represented in the Balata Botanical Garden. In addition, small ponds are broken in the garden, the water surface of which is covered with lilies and water lilies.

 

 

46. ​​The history of the volcano Mon - Pele, the second name of which sounds like "Bald Mountain", is quite tragic. Back in the 18th century, he began to show signs of life, but they were insignificant and soon completely stopped. However, in May 1902, a serious volcanic eruption occurred, as a result of which the former capital of the island, the city of Saint-Pierre, was completely destroyed by ash and stones that escaped from the mouth of Mont-Pele. Subsequently, the Museum of Volcanology was opened in the city, and Enns-Siron Beach, which is of volcanic origin, is also located here.

 

47. Balata Church is located 10 kilometers from the capital of the island and is a copy of the Sacré-Coeur Basilica in France. This magnificent building was erected in 1928 in the Romano-Byzantine style.

 

48. The building has a rectangular shape and is crowned with a dome resembling the silhouette of a basilica. Outside, the shrine is decorated with sculptures, and its interior is full of stained glass windows and mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible. The church was built on the territory of the Jardin-Balata botanical garden and is surrounded by artificial ponds with lilies and water lilies.

 

49. Fort Desaix is ​​one of several structures built in the 18th century. It was intended to protect the capital of the island from attacks on the island. The fort is named after the French general Louis Charles Antoine Desaix, who took part in the Egyptian campaign of Napoleon Bonaparte.

 

50. Initially, the structure had an irregular pentagonal shape. During the Great Patriotic War, gold bars from the Bank of Gold and Foreign Exchange Reserves of France were stored here. Today, the fort is reserved for the headquarters of the armed forces of France.

 

 

51. In the north of the island you can see beaches with black and gray sand. This is due to volcanic activity in the local mountains. The southern coast of the island is famous for its white sandy beaches.

 

52. Most of the population of Martinique are the descendants of African slaves who were once brought here to work on French plantations. Almost all the Indians who lived here before the arrival of the French were exterminated or fled from the island, so today they cannot be found here. Whites make up only about 5% of the island's population. Some of them are Russian-speaking diaspora. 90% of the population professes Catholicism.

 

53. French has the status of an official language in Martinique, but "patois" (a mixture of African dialects and French) is much more common among the local population.

 

54. There are no minerals in Martinique. But the island is well developed agriculture and tourism. Bananas and pineapples are grown here, and sugar and rum are also produced. And all this is exported.

 

55. And Martinique does not produce anything else. Meat, grain, vegetables, drinks, medicines, furniture, dishes, clothes and oil have to be imported.

 

56. There are not very many tropical forests left here, they are preserved only on the slopes of the mountains.

 

57. The nature of Martinique is generous and varied, but there are few animals in the forests. Basically, some species of rodents, snakes, as well as domestic animals predominate in the local fauna. The scarcity of the animal world is associated with the massive deforestation of tropical forests, which have survived in the wild only in mountainous regions.

 

 

58. There is an island of iguanas in Martinique - these are reptiles, huge lizards.

 

59. Previously, there were a lot of lizards and snakes on the island. To combat them, in the 1800s, planters brought mongooses to the island. But it did not end in anything good: the mongooses multiplied very quickly and began to devour bird eggs. Because of this, some other species of birds have been completely exterminated or endangered.

 

60.Park Floral is a park area located in the capital of Martinique and abounding with flowers of various kinds. A huge variety of flowers is complemented by bizarre and unique palm trees, as well as entire groves of eucalyptus.

 

61. In the park, you can walk for a very long time or sit on a bench and admire this colorful beauty of the surrounding nature. In addition, food fairs and shopping arcades are also located here, where you can buy products created by the hands of local craftsmen.

 

62. A colorful sight is the black volcanic sand beach of Enns Siron. The old villages of Enns Belleville and Le Precher, the remains of chocolate plantations, are also interesting for tourists. And for a good rest on the water, the beach in Enns Culver Bay is perfect.

 

63. Tourists will also be interested in seeing the building of the Scholcher Library, Saint-Louis Cathedral, visiting the Museum of the Department of Archeology and seeing the Fort-de-France Aquarium.

 

 

64. In the northern part of Martinique, the fishing town of Grand Rivière is interesting to visit with a colorful fish market and rows of fishing boats painted in bright colors. Also, the Grand Rivière offers an excellent panorama of the Martinique Strait, and in good weather you can see the distant coast of the Dominican Republic.

 

65. A trip to the town of Sainte-Marie, which is famous for its rum, will be interesting. At the Museum of Rum, you can taste various varieties of this drink produced in Sainte-Marie.

 

66. Not far from the town of Diamant, where houses are built of coral blocks, there is a small volcanic island Rocher du Diamant, with an incredibly rich underwater world (for which Rocher du Diamant received the unofficial title of "Mecca of divers" of Martinique).

 

67. Many tourists who decide to tour Martinique are attracted not only by the opportunity to relax on the tropical coast and dive into the Caribbean and Atlantic waters, but also by a large number of festivals, the number of which Martinique is often compared with Cuba and Brazil.

 

68. Some of the most colorful events of this kind are the Queen's Carnival and the Mardi Gras Carnival (“Fat Tuesday”, the last day before the start of Lent in the Catholic Church), which take place on the island in February.

 

69. In addition, Martinique is famous for its sports festivals and events: first of all, we are talking about Navigation Week and international competitions in yachting and windsurfing (take place from February 4 to 9), as well as surfing competitions.

 

 

70. Despite the small size of the island, several queens ruling in France, Holland and Turkey were originally from Martinique: Josephine de Beauharnais, wife of Napoleon I; her daughter from her first marriage, Hortense de Beauharnais, who became Queen of Holland; her distant relative Aime de Ribery (Nakshedil), who accidentally got into the harem of the Turkish Sultan Abdul-Hamid I.

 

71.Since tourism is the main source of income for the local population, in terms of security, Martinique is quite a calm place. However, do not lose vigilance! Street theft and fraud here, as elsewhere in the world, is a common form of crime.

 

72. And the main health risks while staying on the island are: inattention to solar activity on the beaches - as a result, sunburn and overheating, as well as local jellyfish are quite poisonous! One must be careful when swimming in the sea; should be protected from insect bites. Repellents must be used!

 

73. The southern part of the island, well developed and mastered by tourists, is quite flat. All mountains are in the north. For this reason, small waterfalls can also only be seen in the north.

 

74. An interesting variety of trees in Martinique is the traveler's palm. Her crown is like an open fan. The palm tree accumulates water inside the trunk, thanks to which it helps to save the afflicted from thirst.

 

75. Martinique is similar to the southern Mediterranean coast of France. Like some suburb of Nice.

 

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