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Bad day🙈😋

3 years ago

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@TMNTfan2334 Poor puppy!
when-you-have-to-read-the-same-paragraph-over-and-over-again-because-you-cant-focus
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@Maia 😄😄:D

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@2263_panda_3495 He was on his own and chillin like a villain 🥱until his owner pulled some moves 🙄on the little yogi Gabba bear ..🙄He’s like don’t you dare touch me you fiend .🤡
35-famous-latin-phrases-to-add-to-your-vocabulary-and-what-they-mean

The vast majority of people associate Latin with doctors' prescriptions, because, as we know, they are written in Latin. But at the same time, there are many well-known phrases in Latin, which, no, no, and you will meet in someone's speech.


People who can speak this ancient language are perceived by others as educated. But sometimes it’s not at all necessary to learn it “from and to”, it’s enough to remember a few common phrases and, if necessary, flaunt them in a conversation - and then you will certainly look smarter in the eyes of other people. Moreover, you already know something: for example, alma mater, persona non grata, etc.


Learn to speak Latin


Bemorepanda has collected 35 Latin expressions (and their meanings) that can be used in conversation. The main thing is that they are "on topic".


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


1. "Mulgere hircum" - "Milk a goat"


This Latin phrase means trying to do something impossible. Which makes sense, given that it's impossible to milk a goat.


2. "Festina lente" - "Hurry slowly"


In fact, this expression calls to act quickly, but prudently, carefully. Augustus, the Roman emperor, often chastised his generals, advising them to "make haste slowly" because he thought that haste was dangerous.


3. "Persona non grata" - "Persona non grata" ("Unwanted person")


Refers to a person who is not welcome or is not wanted to go anywhere due to their behavior or other reasons. For example: "He became persona non grata in our company after his indecent behavior."


4. "Alma mater" - "Caring mother"


This refers to the educational institution that a person once attended: school, college, university.


5. "Veni, vidi, vici" - "I came, I saw, I conquered"


Julius Caesar is believed to have used the phrase in a letter he wrote to the Roman Senate in 47 BC to inform them of his victory over the Pontic king Pharnaces II near Zela.


6. "Acta, non verba" - "Deeds, not words"


In other words, "More action - less words." That is, always back up your words with deeds or act in accordance with what you say.


7. "Ad meliora" - "For the better"


8. "Mortuum flagellas" - "Smack the dead"


This Latin phrase means a useless action towards someone who will not be affected in any way.


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


9. "Amicus certus in re incerta cernitur" - "Friends are known in the hour of need"


We have it sounds like "A friend in need is known."


10. "Malo mori quam foedari" - "Better death than dishonor"


11. "De gustibus non est disputandum" - "Tastes do not argue"


Tastes are evaluated more subjectively than objectively - everyone has their own.


12. "Lupus in fabula" - "Wolf in a fairy tale"


With the meaning "Speak about the wolf and he will come" (from Terence's play "Adelfoy").


13. "Alea iacta est" - "The die is cast"


This is another phrase Julius Caesar uttered when he entered Italy and started a protracted civil war against Pompey and the optimates. The meaning of the phrase is "There is no going back."


14. "Carpe diem" - "Seize the moment"


Another Latin phrase that is often used these days. The saying aims to motivate people to focus on the present, not the future, and make the most of it.


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


15. "Aut Caesar aut nihil" - "Either Caesar, or nothing"


It is pretty much the Latin equivalent of "All or Nothing". The notorious Italian Cardinal Cesare Borgia lived according to this principle. Now this phrase can be used to denote an adamant desire to succeed.


16. "Ad astra per aspera" - "Through adversity to the stars"


For us, the sound is more familiar: “Through thorns to the stars,” but the essence of this does not change.


17. "Pecunia non olet" - "Money does not smell"


It is believed that the history of the origin of this expression is as follows. When the Roman emperor Vespasian introduced a tax on public toilets, his son Titus complained about the "disgusting" nature of the money. Vespasian held up a gold coin and asked if it smelled, and he himself answered: non olet ("it does not smell"). From here, the phrase was expanded to pecunia non olet - "Money does not smell."


18. "Mea culpa" - "My fault"


This Latin phrase is used to admit one's fault or mistake.


19. "De facto" - "Actually"


De facto describes a real situation, though not necessarily intentional or legal. For example: Whatever is on the calendar, Florida is de facto summer. Or: De facto, it is he who is the leader at the moment.


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


20. "Et cetera" - "And so on"


Perhaps every student's favorite expression when they simply can't name more examples.


21. "Nitimur in vetitum" - "We strive for the forbidden"


Means that when we are denied something, we will want it even more. Think of Eve, who ate the forbidden fruit. No wonder they say: "Forbidden fruit is sweet."


22. "In vino veritas" - "Truth is in wine"


This Latin proverb implies that a person under the influence of alcohol is more inclined to express his hidden desires and thoughts.


The same as "What is on the sober mind, the drunk on the tongue."


23. "Quid pro quo" - "Something for something"


In other words, quid pro quo. Basically, this Latin phrase means favor in exchange for something.


24. "Status quo" - "The current state (of affairs)"


Applies to the current situation. For example: "The maintenance of such a status quo only weakened our already fragile positions."


25. "Audentes fortuna iuvat" - "Fortune favors the brave"


Apparently, these were the last words of Pliny the Elder before he sailed from the docks of Pompeii in 79 to save his friend Pomponianus from the eruption of Vesuvius.


In the same sense as "Who does not risk, he does not drink champagne" or "The courage of the city takes."


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


26. "Amor vincit omnia" - "Love conquers all"


This Latin saying originally appeared in Virgil's Eclogues (X, 69) in the 1st century BC. The phrase means unshakable love that will endure any trials and overcome all obstacles that stand in the way. Therefore, they often say: "There are no barriers to love."


27. "Surdo oppedere" - "Burp in front of the deaf"


Simply put, according to Desiderius Erasmus' Adagia (1508), surdo oppedere means a useless action.


Well, or in our manner: “Throw pearls in front of pigs”, that is, it’s pointless to prove or explain something to someone, because he still won’t understand or appreciate it.


28. "Cui bono?" "Good for who?"


This term implies that one should look for the culprit in the person to whom the unpleasant event will benefit / benefit.


29. "Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes" - "Fear the Danaans who bring gifts"


This expression from the Aeneid, the Latin epic poem by Virgil, was uttered by the Trojan priest Laocoön when he warned his fellow Trojans about accepting the Trojan horse from the Greeks.


An alternative translation could be: "Do not trust your enemies who bring you gifts", as this may be to your detriment.


35 famous Latin phrases to add to your vocabulary and what they mean


30. “Homo sum humani a me nihil linearum puto” - “I am a man, therefore nothing human is alien to me”


Something like “We are all people, we are all people” (the expression came from Russian classical literature). It means that any person has weaknesses or can stumble, do something unseemly.


31. "Sine qua non" - "Sine qua non"


Refers to something absolutely necessary, without which something is impossible.


32. "Qui totum vult totum perdit" - "He who wants everything loses everything."


From the same series as "You want a lot - you get a little."


33. "Solamen miseris socios habuisse doloris" - "Misfortune loves company"


It is understood that it is a consolation for the unfortunate that others share their grief.


We usually say: "Together, grief is easier to bear."


34. "Oderint dum metuant" - "Let them hate, if only they were afraid"


Favorite saying of Caligula, originally attributed to Lucius Actius, Roman tragic poet (170 BC); also the motto of the Russian noble family Krasnitsky.


35. "Cogito, ergo sum" - "I think, therefore I am"


This famous phrase by René Descartes may seem vague and confusing, but it was the result of his unique, individualistic approach to philosophy. According to him, many of the world's problems stem from the way we use our minds - from misunderstanding, poor definition, and unintentional illogicality.



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@dray25 😄 good to know 😄
french-cuisine-enter-in-the-cooking-traditions-from-france

The fact that the French are reputed to be gourmets has probably been heard by many. In France, people's interest in delicious food is considered completely natural and perhaps even ahead of their love interest, in which, by world recognition, the French have no equal.

 

What defines French cuisine?

 

Naturally, in France, oysters are the most common dish. Connoisseurs consider these mollusks the most exquisite food. Oysters are grown in particular plantations with seawater, where the salt content is low, or they are caught in the tidal zone, near the mouth of the rivers. French flat types of oysters are called belon, marine, and Arcachon. 

 

They sell oysters by weight from September to October. When buying oysters, you must ensure their shells are tightly closed; if the shell is open, the mollusk is dead. There is a special knife for opening oysters. After opening the shell, you need to squeeze lemon juice and take it out of the shell. 

 

When preparing many dishes, the French put a small bunch of herbs in the pan, which gives the words a unique French flavor. It is called "bouquet garni" and consists of parsley, savory, and bay leaf. Before serving, the beam is removed. It is impossible to keep silent about the chic desserts, which the French undoubtedly know. This is cherry clafoutis pie, delicious Tarte Tatin - open fruit cakes, and of course, the famous creme brulee - cream baked with caramel crust - the king and master of all desserts.

 

What are the secret ingredients French chefs use?

 

Despite regional differences (and the cuisine of Provence and the cuisine of Burgundy differ significantly), a characteristic feature of the national French cuisine is the abundance of vegetables and root crops. Potatoes, green beans, varieties of onions, spinach, cabbage of multiple types, tomatoes, eggplants, celery, parsley, and salads are used for preparing snacks, first and second courses, and side dishes. Compared to other European countries, French cooking uses fewer dairy products. The exception is cheeses, famous all over the world. A dish with cheeses and a green salad are always served before dessert.

 

France produces at least 500 varieties of cheese. Almost every French village knows its unique recipe for making cheese. Among them are Roquefort, Gruyere, Camembert, etc. Omelets and cheese souffle are typical for the French table, which is cooked with seasonings and fillings: ham, mushrooms, and herbs. The quality and characteristics inherent in each product must be preserved. 

 

Of the first courses, leek puree soup with potatoes and onion soup seasoned with cheese is very favorite. Provencal thick fish soup bouillabaisse is also widely known. French chefs use various meat products: veal, beef, lamb, poultry, and game. Dishes from the sea and freshwater fish are trendy: cod, halibut, pike, carp, and seafood such as oysters, shrimps, lobsters, and scallops. The French are considered the inventors of sauces. In their preparation and invention of new recipes, you will not find their equals worldwide.

 

French cuisine – famous dishes

 

Describing French cuisine is a thankless task. Long considered one of the best in the world, it absorbed many peoples' culinary traditions and became a source of inspiration for followers from different countries. Suffice it to say that the names of several French dishes, wines, sauces, and the methods of processing and cooking products have entered many languages ​​​​and are understandable without translation. France is considered the birthplace of almost half of the most popular dishes and drinks in Europe, and many of its "works" have long become "their own" in the cuisines of other European nations, in some cases turning into world-famous trademarks (suffice it to recall mayonnaise, fricassee, champagne or cognac ).

 

Salmon En Papillote

 

Salmon, along with fried fennel, half-boiled potatoes, shallots, herbs, a piece of butter, and a small amount of white wine, is sealed “en papillote,” that is, in a parchment roll, and baked until the fish becomes tender. Each serving is served directly in the package. There are some advantages to this baking method: ease of preparation, clean dishes, fish and vegetables steamed with aromatic additives, which are very tasty, juicy, and healthy. Serve the packages sealed so that each guest opens their portion and enjoys the incredible aroma. And next to the table put a tapenade of olives. It complements the taste of salmon nicely.

 

Ingredients for the recipe:

Salmon

  • 1 st. l. rapeseed oil, one fennel root, cut into 0.5 cm thick slices
  • Two potatoes, peeled and cut into 0.3 cm thick slices
  • Four skinless salmon fillets, 140g each
  • 1/4 st. white wine
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 1 tbsp minced fresh tarragon, 1/4 shallot, minced

 

Tapenade

  • 1 st. pitted manzanilla olives, rinsed, dried, and finely chopped
  • 1 st. l. capers, rinse, pat dry, and finely chop
  • One anchovy, minced
  • One garlic clove, minced
  • 1/4 st. olive oil
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 st. l. chopped fresh parsley

 

Recipe preparation:

 

Prepare salmon: Preheat oven to 150°C. Bring salted water to a boil in a saucepan. Place a skillet over moderately high heat and add vegetable oil. Sprinkle the fennel with salt and black pepper. Once the oil is hot, add the fennel and fry on one side until golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes.

Meanwhile, boil the potato slices in water for 3 minutes, then drain. Cut out four pieces of parchment paper in the shape of a large heart, then fold them in half. Lift one side of each parchment heart, place some fennel in the center of the bottom half, then top with potatoes and salmon. Top each piece of salmon with a quarter of the white wine, butter, tarragon, and shallots: salt and pepper. Start closing the rolls of parchment, crimping the edges in small folds, so they are all tightly sealed. Place them on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes, depending on how you want them to be.

 

Make the tapenade: While the salmon is in the oven, toss the olives, capers, anchovies, and garlic in a bowl. Add olive oil, lemon juice, and honey and mix until smooth. Sprinkle the tapenade with chopped parsley. Open the packages with fish on the table and put a spoonful of tapenades in each serving.

 

Quiche Lorraine

 

Quiche is an open pastry pie filled with cheese, cream, eggs, and milk. It isn't easy to disagree with such a formulation of the question. We can only add that this dish is most likely of French origin, although some consider it English. In any case, perhaps the most famous variant of quiche in the world, Loraine quiche, comes from the French Lorraine, which is where the name, as you can see, comes from.

 

Ingredients:

 

For the dough

 

  • Flour, 125g
  • Salt, 1/2 teaspoon
  • Butter, 100g
  • Icy water, 3 tbsp. spoons

 

For filling

 

  • Bacon, 6-12 pieces, to taste
  • Eggs, four pcs.
  • Heavy cream, 1 cup
  • Milk, 1 cup
  • Swiss cheese, 150g
  • Onion, or shallot, a little (optional)
  • Salt, 1/2 teaspoon
  • Nutmeg, a little

 

Recipe preparation:

 

We make shortbread dough - add finely chopped butter cubes to the sifted and salted flour.

Then mix so that it turns out as homogeneous as possible, although you can’t do without lumps.

Then add ice water one tablespoon at a time and stir constantly. It is best to put a bowl of dough on ice in addition.

We interfere until a homogeneous mass is formed, from which we sculpt a ball and send it to the refrigerator for at least an hour.

Meanwhile, fry the bacon.

We cut the bacon into smaller pieces, do the same with the onion, and rub the cheese. Cheese is needed like Emmental or Gruyère.

We put good eggs in a bowl.

Add cream, milk, salt, and nutmeg. We mix.

Stir in the grated cheese as well.

When the dough is ready, roll it out and place it in a mold smeared with butter.

Spread the bacon and onion evenly on the bottom.

Then gently pour in the cream cheese mixture.

We cook for 15 minutes at 220 C, after which we reduce the heat to 160 C and cook for another 35 minutes.

Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

 

Potatoes Dauphinoise

 

If you love potatoes, why not spruce up your "potato menu" with a good old French recipe. We offer to cook potatoes "dauphine" or potatoes "a la dauphinoise."

 

Ingredients:

 

  • 500 g potatoes
  • One egg
  • One glass of milk
  • 200 g grated cheddar cheese
  • 45 g butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • a pinch of black pepper
  • a pinch of nutmeg
  • One garlic clove

 

Cooking:

 

Peel the potatoes and cut them into thin slices. Salt and pepper to taste, and add nutmeg and half of the grated cheese. Mix everything. Pour the milk into the potatoes and crack the egg. Mix well. Rub a dish for baking potatoes with garlic and brush with oil. Put the potato mixture in it, and sprinkle the remaining cheese on top. Cut the butter into small pieces and place it on top. Put the dishes with potatoes in a preheated oven for about 40 minutes. The word is ready when the potatoes become soft and a golden crust appears on top.

 

Bouillabaisse

 

When the Marseille fishers cooked soup from the remains of an unsold catch in the evening, they did not suspect that in the future, this dish would become a delicacy that would be served in the best French restaurants. The first Marseille bouillabaisse was made from pieces of dry bread, small fish, shrimp, squid, and shellfish, and now lobsters and expensive fish are added to this soup, so the cost of a bowl of soup sometimes reaches 200 euros. According to the French legend, the goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite, was engaged in the preparation of bouillabaisse. She fed her husband Hephaestus with it because she was born from sea foam and the sea element was almost native to her. However, let's go down from Mount Olympus and go to the kitchen to understand how to cook bouillabaisse at home.

 

So, if you follow the recommendations of experienced chefs, to prepare a classic bouillabaisse, you will need:

 

  • 2 kg of any medium-sized sea fish and some vegetables - fennel bulb
  • Three tomatoes
  • Three garlic cloves
  • Two leeks
  • Two heads of onion
  • Three celery stalks

 

From spices, take a bouquet garni, which includes parsley, bay leaf, thyme, basil, rosemary, tarragon, sea salt, and olive oil will also come in handy.

 

Cooking method:

 

Finely chop the celery, the whole leek, one clove of garlic, and one onion. Fry, constantly stirring, vegetables in 7 tbsp. l. olive oil. Rinse the fish, clean it from the insides, remove the tails, heads, and fins, and place it in the pan with the roasting vegetables. Add water, so it is above the level of the fish trimmings, and then simmer for 20 minutes. Pour boiling water over the tomatoes, remove the skin from them and grind the pulp into a puree. Finely chop the fennel, one more onion, and two cloves of garlic, and fry the vegetables in a pan in a small amount of oil. Add chopped tomato pulp to vegetables. Strain the cooled fish broth, remove the heads, and wipe the vegetable grounds through a sieve. Pour the broth into the fried vegetables, mix with the mashed vegetables from the broth, salt, and add seasonings. Put the pieces of chopped fish into the broth and cook it until soft. Serve the broth separately - with a toasted baguette and Provence garlic rui sauce, which you can cook yourself. The fish is laid out on a plate, and everyone adds it to the broth on their own.

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@Anny So tasty!
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