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50-pictures-from-positano-italys-amalfi-coast-that-are-from-a-fairy-tale-bemorepanda

A little to the south. In 1997, this picturesque coast was included in the list of monuments.

The Amalfi Coast is a popular tourist destination. The pearl on the Amalfi Coast is rightly considered a fishing village, whose colorful houses descend from the slopes of the mountains directly to the sea on the terraces (some books were even written in honor of this village). On the streets of Positano, a series of scenes were filmed from the romantic comedy Under the Tuscan Sun (2003).


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Near Positano is located the highest place on the peninsula - the peak of Monte Faito (1131 m). In the comedy film "Knight and Day", Tom Cruise's hero admits his dream of living on the Amalfi Coast, with nothing but a backpack and a motorcycle.


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The best time to enjoy the local beauty is from April to June, when everything is in flowers, aromas of flowering oranges and jasmine, and the weather is already quite warm, and sometimes you can even swim. Choosing a late spring or early summer, you can avoid the crowds of tourists, which in July and August can be quite significant. In addition, in high season there is intense heat, so hiking in high areas can be a little heavy.


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In the winter season - on the contrary - many hotels and restaurants are closed and there are no ordinary trips to enjoy the coast from the water. In winter it is deserted, and the waves hit the rocks with such force that the spray reaches the balconies of the houses. The weather is quite humid and colder, with a temperature of about 10 degrees in the coldest months. The wettest month is November, a little less - October and December), and the least rain falls in July.


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Officially, the tourist season starts here at Easter and lasts until September. In May and June, prices are usually lower than in July and August. The best time to visit is May, with an ideal temperature, a riot of flowers and only a small number of tourists.


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Positano is the first stop, this village with less than 4000 inhabitants marking the beginning of the Amalfi Coast. If in the 1950s Positano was a poor village where most of the inhabitants lived from fishing, everything changed with its popularization by John Steinbeck.


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In 1953 he described Positano as "a dream place that doesn't really seem real when you're there, but that becomes real and tempting once you're gone." More and more tourists have started visiting this village since then, and today tourism is the main source of income.


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Despite the large number of tourists, Positano retains its vibrant personality, continuing to impress through the houses located on the steep coast, the narrow streets and the steep steps that connect them.


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If Positano seems too crowded and expensive, on the way to the Amalfi Coast you will discover Praiano, a fishing village full of history. A key attraction is the church of San Luca, dating from 1123, where you can see paintings from the 16th century.


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What can Positano delight you with, once you decide to visit it:


  • enjoy a day at the beach with lovely views. Walk to Marina Grande or Fornillo beach where the prices are a bit friendlier.


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  • explore the winding streets on foot. This is a place where fashion is at home.

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  • visit the church of Santa Maria Assunata which rises in the main square, Flavio Gioia. You will recognize it from a distance by the dome of colored tiles (majolica tiles).

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  • take a walk in the mountains. From the village of Nocelle begins the road Sentiero degli Dei. The Path of the Gods is a pleasant road to walk from where you will have the opportunity to see the panorama of the entire coastal area.

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@6794_panda_1321 City of my dreams!😍
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30-facts-about-rome-the-city-where-all-roads-lead-for-travellers

Italian Rome is one of the popular tourist destinations. And, in general, it is clear why guests from all over the world tend to visit the Eternal City. Incredible works of art, excellent cuisine, architecture can lure any travel lover, leaving the impression of visiting Rome for a lifetime and giving rise to the desire to return there at least once again.


Why is it said that all roads lead to Rome?


Bemorepanda has collected exciting facts ranging from ancient Rome to today's Rome, which may be the final push to encourage you to put this city on your following trip list. Or you want to learn more about it from other sources - books, online tours, films, which will also be good because knowledge is never extra.


Especially when it comes to a city with such a long history, by the way, if you are still going on a trip, some of our collection's facts will be useful to you, because they will help you protect yourself from violating local laws and traditions.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


1. The law in Rome allows cats to live freely where they were born.


There are rules to protect wild cat colonies, as Italians are fond of cats. Cats are allowed to roam freely anywhere, even in famous historical places. Anyone who harms a cat in Italy can be charged with a crime.


By the way, according to some estimates, the cat population in Rome is 300,000 individuals. For cat lovers, there is a particular part of Rome that is a must-see on any visit. Among the ancient ruins of Largo di Torre, Argentina, is a cat sanctuary that currently houses over 250 cats.


2. Bruschetta originates in ancient Rome when olive growers spread their oil on a slice of bread.


It is generally accepted that bruschetta was created in Italy in the 15th century. However, the origins of this dish date back to Ancient Rome, when olive growers would take their olives to the nearest olive press and taste the freshly pressed oil using a slice of bread. Bruschetta is still a popular appetizer in Rome today.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


3. Rome has over 2,000 fountains


Rome has more fountains than any other city, with over 2,000 in total, including 50 monumental fountains and hundreds of smaller fountains.


4. Nearly 1.5 million euros worth of coins are thrown into the Trevi Fountain in Rome yearly.


You must have heard of the Trevi Fountain coin tradition: with their backs turned to the fountain, visitors must toss a coin over their shoulder, hoping it will fall into the fountain. According to legend, if you throw one cash into the fountain, then you will return to Rome; if you throw two coins, then you will return and fall in love; and if you throw three coins, then you will return, fall in love and get married!


But what happens to all this money? Are other people tempted to take them out of the water? This is the case, as back in 2001, the then mayor of Rome issued a decree that the coins from the fountain would be collected by the municipality and then donated to charity.


Regularly assigned officers collect coins with a brush and a suction hose while police officers are on duty nearby.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


5. In ancient Rome, only freeborn men were allowed to wear the toga, a sign of Roman citizenship.


Putting on the toga was easy, if manageable. A strip of fabric was folded lengthwise; one end was thrown over the left shoulder, the toga was thrown over the back, and the other end was passed under the right shoulder and thrown over the left shoulder in front. Wealthier citizens had a particular slave (vestiplik), which made this challenging task easier for them.


By the way, the length of the toga was from 3.7 to 6.1 m, so it is not surprising that an assistant was required to put it on. However, because putting on a toga was such a complicated matter, and besides, the outfit itself was costly, it gradually fell into disuse, first among citizens of the lower class, then among the representatives of the middle class, and began to be worn by the upper class only on solemn occasions.


6. Rome became the capital of a united Italy in 1870, taking over the title from Florence.


Rome was a candidate for the title of capital because of its symbolic importance in the history of Italy as a territory of the former Roman Empire and its even more advantageous position. The migration to Rome was in full swing when the Franco-Prussian War broke out in 1870.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


7. St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican is the largest Christian church ever built.


Although St. Peter's Basilica is a revered gathering place and the leading tourist destination in the Vatican, it has another purpose. It is claimed to be the final resting place of Saint Peter, whose tomb is said to be under the basilica's main altar.


In addition, several generations of great masters worked on its creation: Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, and Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini - therefore, it is not surprising that St. Peter's Basilica is the most famous work of Renaissance architecture.


8. CinecittĂ  Studios, the largest film studio in Europe, is located in Rome


Roman Holiday (1953), Ben Hur (1959), La Dolce Vita (1960), Cleopatra (1963), Romeo and Juliet (1968), and many other famous films were made at CinecittĂ . As you can see, the film studio is used for both American and Italian film production. Therefore, it is very likely that the film you like was made at this film studio!


More than 3,000 films have been filmed here, 90 of which have been nominated for an Oscar, and 47 have won. In the 1950s, several international productions led to Rome being nicknamed "Hollywood on the Tiber."


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


9. Rome has a museum entirely dedicated to pasta.


It makes sense that the world's only pasta museum is in Rome, Italy, as the country is known for its perfect combination of flour, water, and salt.


10. Paris is the only official sister city of Rome.


With the motto “Only Paris is worthy of Rome; only Rome is worthy of Paris,” Rome and Paris have been the only sister cities since 1956.


Twinning between the two cities is, first of all, a symbol of cooperation and mutual assistance. However, in addition to the character, this partnership allows Parisians free access to many of Rome's museums (Musei Capitolini, Galleria d'arte moderna, Museo Civico di Zoologia, Museo di Roma) and vice versa (free admission for Romans to the typically paid temporary exhibitions of Paris museums).


11. Not a single building in the center of Rome can be higher than St. Peter's Basilica (136 meters) in the Vatican


No building in the central area of Rome, bounded by the walls of Aurelian, can be higher than the dome of St. Peter's Basilica, which rises to 136 meters. Torre Eurosky (Eurosky Tower), a skyscraper built in the EUR area (EUR) in 2012 (outside the prohibition zone), has a height of 155 meters and is the only building exceeding this limit.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


12. There are over 900 churches in Rome


Rome has over 900 churches, which is no surprise given that no other city is so closely associated with the Catholic faith.


13. Trajan's market is believed to be the world's first indoor shopping center. A variety of goods were sold there, including groceries.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


14. There are at least 40 ancient catacombs under Rome.


While many Romans built ornate roadside tombs, Christians buried their dead in the labyrinths of the catacombs. By excavating pliable tuff (light, cemented, porous rock), miles of underground tunnels were laid, which became the graves for many ordinary Christians, saints and martyrs.


15. Smoking is prohibited in all public places in Rome


Smoking is prohibited in closed public places and workplaces, such as government, medical and educational institutions, and places frequented by minors. However, smoking is allowed in designated smoking areas in some public places and workplaces such as bars and nightclubs.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


16. The Spanish stairs are not Spanish


These 18th-century Baroque steps that descend from the Trinita dei Monti church to the Piazza di Spagna below were created by an Italian architect at the request of a French diplomat. The square and the staircase owe their name to the Palazzo di Spagna (Palace of Spain), the residence of the Spanish ambassador to the Holy See in the Vatican.


17. The symbol of Rome is a she-wolf who took care of the brothers Romulus and Remus, the mythological founders of Rome


According to the Roman founding myth, the twins Romulus and Remus were left in the forest under the command of King Amulius of Alba Longa. They were fed and protected by a she-wolf until they were found by a shepherd named Faustulus.


The image of a she-wolf breastfeeding twins has been a symbol of Rome since ancient times and is one of the most recognizable icons of ancient mythology.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


18. Women in ancient Rome dyed their hair with goat fat and beech tree ash.


Roman women were very fond of dyeing their hair. The most popular colors were red, black and blond. Even by law, prostitutes had to be blonde to distinguish themselves from ordinary Roman women. However, despite this, the locals continued to dye their hair. Various substances were used to create different colors, including goat fat, beech ash, henna, saffron, and bleach.


Numerous methods for obtaining dyes also included boiled and crushed walnuts, burnt and charred ant eggs, rotting remains of game, or various types of xia with soaked and rotten leeches that were aged in red wine for 40 days.


19. Rome's first university, La Sapienza, founded in 1303 AD, is one of the largest universities in Europe


Sapienza served as the leading educational institution for most of the Italian aristocracy. Numerous Nobel Prize winners, Presidents of the European Parliament and European Commissioners, heads of several countries, prominent religious figures, scientists and astronauts are just some of the notable Sapienza alumni.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


20. Rome was founded in 753 BC.


Romulus and his twin brother Remus are said to have founded Rome on April 21, 753 BC. just in the place where they were nursed by a she-wolf when they were orphaned babies.


21. The Vatican, the smallest country in the world, is located inside Rome


The Vatican, with an area of only 49 hectares, is the smallest country in the world. In addition, it is the only country in the world located inside another city.


The Vatican has religious and cultural attractions such as St. Peter's Basilica, the Sistine Chapel and the Vatican Museums. They feature some of the world's most famous paintings and sculptures. The Vatican's unique economy is supported financially by donations from the faithful, the sale of postage stamps and souvenirs, museum admission fees, and the sale of publications. There are no taxes in the Vatican and goods are sold duty-free.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


22. All roads really led to Rome


The idiom "All roads lead to Rome" implies that all decisions, strategies or actions lead to the same result. However, this remark had a more literal meaning throughout the early Roman era. All the important highways of the Roman Empire did indeed lead directly to the capital, which was served by a developed network of roads.


At the peak of Rome's development, no less than 29 great military roads diverged from the capital, and 113 provinces of the late empire were connected by 372 great roads. In total, more than 400,000 kilometers of roads were laid, of which more than 80,500 kilometers were paved with stone.


23. Frascati and Castelli Romani are the most famous white wines in Rome


Frascati wines, the most revered of the nine Castelli Romani (Roman castles), are often called "golden wine" by locals because of their golden hue and high price. The fermentation process that takes place in this area while the grapes are still in their skins is what gives the wine its color.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


24. Italians call their capital Roma


In the Latin used in ancient Rome, the original name of the city was Roma. Most likely, the city owes its name to Romulus, who founded it.


25. The flag of Rome consists of vertical stripes of red and yellow, the two colors of the city.


According to the consummate urban portraitist Renzo Vespignani, the color of Rome is the yellow ocher of burnt bread, which, unsurprisingly, is a combination of red and gold.


26. Oscar Wilde called Rome the "Scarlet Woman" and "The Only City of the Soul"


The already well-known Oscar Wilde considered honeymooning his fiancee Constance in Rome in 1884, but decided to take her to Normandy and Paris instead. Wilde did not spend much time in Rome until almost the end of his life.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


27. There are about 60 museums in Rome


Rome is one of the most culturally diverse cities in the world, and museums are a great way to experience its history and culture. The museums of Rome also contain masterpieces by artists such as Michelangelo, Raphael, Bernini, Caravaggio, Cavallini and many others.


28. Rome has only hosted the Olympics once: the 1960 Summer Olympics


The XVII Olympiad, or 1960 Olympic Games, was held in Rome, Italy from August 25 to September 11, 1960. There were many innovations at these Olympic Games, for example, they were shown on television for the first time, the Olympic anthem was played for the first time, and for the first time an Olympic winner ran barefoot!


By the way, the Soviet Union won the most gold and overall medals at the 1960 Games.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


29. Rome Termini train station is one of the busiest stations in Europe, serving more than 180 million passengers annually


Rome Termini is likely to be a stopover on your itinerary whether you arrive in Rome by plane, train or ship. The name of the station comes from the Termini area, which takes its name from the Roman baths (thermae) that once stood there.


Termini Station is the second largest railway station in Europe after the Gare du Nord of Paris, which receives 200 million passengers every year.


30. In 2016, Rome for the first time in its history and an Italian political party) faced nationwide polls two years later, when it received almost twice as many votes as its closest rival.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


31. Rome is one of the most visited cities in the world


Rome tops the list of Italian cities most loved by travelers from all over the world, hosting 25 million foreign visitors annually. The Colosseum, St. Peter's Basilica and the Trevi Fountain are just a few reasons why the Italian capital is still considered the Eternal City.


Like other Italian cities, Rome levies a tourist tax that helps maintain public transport and infrastructure. It varies from 3 to 7 euros per person per night depending on the hotel or other type of accommodation used (children under 10 years old are exempt from the tax and the tax is no longer charged after 10 days).


32. Rome has one of the smallest inhabited islands in the world.


Isola Tiberina (Tiber Island), a small island in the Tiber River, is located in Rome. It is tiny and barely reaches 270 meters in length. However, the Ponte Cestio and Ponte Fabrizio bridges make it easier to access.


30+ Facts About Rome - The City Where All Roads Lead (For Travellers)


33. Rome ranks 4th in terms of population in the European Union - 2.8 million people live within the city


In addition, Rome held the title of the largest city in the world for 550 years, from 100 BC. to 450 AD This includes a 250-year period at the beginning of the first millennium, when the population of the Italian capital reached 1 million.


The municipality of Rome is made up of 15 districts, each with over 100,000 inhabitants, while its metropolitan area is made up of 120 municipalities and has 4.4 million inhabitants, more than in other major European metropolitan areas.


34. The mayor of Rome officially opens the Christmas season by lighting the Christmas tree in Piazza Venezia.


The celebration of Christmas in the city officially begins with the lighting of the Christmas tree in Piazza Venezia. All this marks the beginning of the holiday season.



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italian-mafia-is-taking-advantage-of-coronavirus-epidemic-to-organize-riots-in-the-country-reports-say

Italian authorities fear that in the south of the country there may be unrest and riots due to the coronavirus, which will provoke the mafia. This is written by the Spanish newspaper ABC.


The newspaper journalist refers to a confidential report prepared for Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte and the country's Interior Minister, which states that in southern Italy "there is a potential danger of spontaneous and organized uprisings." This is associated with the developed shadow economy in this region, as well as with the "all-pervasive influence" of organized crime.

According to the publication, the underground economy employs about four million residents of southern Italy, one in four receives a salary in cash and does not pay taxes. Now they are left virtually without a livelihood. According to authorities, the mafia is ready to take advantage of any such situation.


In Sicily and elsewhere in the south, calls for the looting of supermarkets are already heard, cases of robberies in the streets, when bags of freshly purchased food were taken away from people, became more frequent. A rare day goes by without attacks on pharmacies, writes ABC.


In Palermo, an organized group of 20 people shouting “We have no money, but we must eat!” tried to leave a large supermarket with food-filled carts. The store employees called the police. Now law enforcement agencies monitor all the supermarkets in the city.


The newspaper cites the words of the mayor of Palermo, who said that next to those who are experiencing a crisis with the dignity of the coronavirus, there are “jackals” and “professional protesters” who do not hide their affiliation with the mafia. The mayor called for reporting them to the police. According to ABC, calls for an uprising after April 3, when tough restrictive measures should end (however, the publication indicates that their term is likely to be extended), sound on social networks, there are videos with calls for a “war”.


March 29, it became known that in Italy more than 11 thousands people died due to the coronavirus. In total, there are almost 100 thousand infected people in the country, about four thousand of them are in intensive care units. Italy is in first place in the number of coronavirus victims.

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