Top tags for today
en
CREATE A POST
Search results for "#titanic"

Video is being processed...

Feel free to roam the site while you wait.

+1
Comment
Share
Copy link
Linkedin
Messenger
Whatsapp
Pinterest
Vkontakte
Telegram
Cancel

What about this?不

3 years ago

Video is being processed...

Feel free to roam the site while you wait.

Comment
Share
Copy link
Linkedin
Messenger
Whatsapp
Pinterest
Vkontakte
Telegram
Cancel

Let's check .

3 years ago
lets-check
Comment
Share
Copy link
Linkedin
Messenger
Whatsapp
Pinterest
Vkontakte
Telegram
Cancel

Titanic version

3 years ago

Video is being processed...

Feel free to roam the site while you wait.

Comment
Share
Copy link
Linkedin
Messenger
Whatsapp
Pinterest
Vkontakte
Telegram
Cancel
56-facts-about-the-titanic-the-ship-that-the-media-and-hollywood-made-a-sensation-out-of

The Titanic is one of the most infamous ships of the 20th century. A lot of books have been written about him and a decent number of films have been shot, both documentaries and feature films. We think we won’t be mistaken if we say that the majority’s idea of this ship is probably based on the film adaptation of the movie Titanic, shot by James Cameron in 1997. But it is important to distinguish fiction from real facts, because cinema is what cinema is for, which is primarily intended to attract the attention of viewers with an interesting plot. The script may be based on the fact of something, but this does not mean that the director will thoroughly follow what really happened and will not add something of his own.

 

The ship and the mystery of the disaster still surprises

 

There are a lot of facts about the Titanic on the Internet, and it is difficult to figure out which of them are true and which are false. We at Bemorepanda have tried to collect facts from sources that are trustworthy. Below you can find some facts about the Titanic that you didn't know or that were altered in the movie to add drama to the story.

 

So, are you ready to sail the sea of facts with the Titanic?

 

 

1. Without her husband Isidore, Ida Strauss stubbornly refused to board a lifeboat.

 

Ida and Isidore Strauss, founders of the New York department store Macy's, are perhaps one of the most tragic love stories during the sinking of the Titanic. Ida did not board the lifeboat without her husband, who refused the seat when offered because he knew there were still women and children on board. “Where you are, there I am,” she said to her husband. The couple died together, holding hands. nationalarchives.gov.uk

 

2. The youngest passenger on the Titanic was a two-month-old baby.

Milvina Dean was not only the oldest survivor, but also the youngest passenger on board. She passed away in 2009 at the age of 97. —en.wikipedia.org

 

3. The Chief Baker Was In The Water For Two Hours Before He Was Rescued.

 

It is said that before it was discovered, the head baker, Charles Joughin, had been swimming in the sea for two hours. He insisted that the huge amount of whiskey he drank before the ship sank warmed his body enough to withstand the cold water. — mcgill.ca

 

4. Two young brothers survived on the ship, being without the care of loved ones.

 

The only children who survived the sinking of the Titanic without parents were Edmond and Michel Navratil, who went down in history in this regard. They were known as the "Titanic Orphans" and were two years apart in their ages. In order to take them to America, their father stole them from their mother, whom he separated from. When he put his children on the lifeboat, that was the last time he was seen. —en.wikipedia.org

 

5. A first-class cabin on board the Titanic cost $4,350 (£875), as opposed to the average cost of a first-class bed on the ship, which was £30.

 

6. An optical illusion may have prevented the discovery of the iceberg in time.

 

Historian Tim Maltin argues that the superrefraction was likely caused by atmospheric conditions on the night the ship sank, which may have obscured the iceberg. This may help explain why the iceberg was not discovered until the ship was too close to it to avoid a collision. — history.com

 

7. Milton Hershey was supposed to be on the Titanic.

 

Milton Hershey, the entrepreneur who created the famous Hershey's milk chocolate bar, sent a $300 payment to book a cabin on the Titanic. Hershey and his wife skipped the trip because work was more important than anything. — hersheyarchives.org

 

8. Lifeboat training was planned on the day of the crash, but it was canceled for unknown reasons. Captain Edward Smith decided to cancel the exercise.

 

9. Only half of the passengers would have been saved if the full capacity of the lifeboats had been used.

 

10 Benjamin Guggenheim Remained A Gentleman In The Face Of Disaster.

 

Upon learning that the ship was sinking, American businessman Benjamin Guggenheim and his servant Victor Giglio dressed in their best evening attire. Guggenheim reportedly stated, "We are dressed in our best and ready to leave like gentlemen." amazon.com

 

11. The first lifeboat was launched an hour after hitting the iceberg.

 

It might seem logical for a ship to immediately launch lifeboats when the hull is breached. However, it took the Titanic an entire hour before it launched its first lifeboat. — historylink.org

 

12. During the construction of the Titanic, 8 people died and 28 serious accidents occurred, 218 minor accidents were also reported by Harland and Wolff.

 

13. Tens of thousands of dollars were paid for the final dinner menu from the Titanic.

 

The Titanic's Ultimate First Class Dining Menu was purchased by a private collector for $88,000 on September 30, 2015 in an online auction. The collector overpaid $18,000 over the original top price. — smithsonianmag.com

 

14. While the Titanic may have had 64 lifeboats, it only had 20.

 

Many of the Titanic's lifeboats were not completely filled with the number of passengers they were designed to carry. — wikipedia.org

 

15. 13 couples on board the Titanic went on a honeymoon trip. Lifeboats were made available primarily to newlyweds from among other people.

 

16. The Titanic sank in 2 hours and 40 minutes.

The New York Times ran a headline stating that the Titanic sank four hours after hitting the iceberg in its original report of the tragedy. The fact that the ship sank faster was not known to the general public. aeaweb.org

 

17. The Titanic sank very quickly.

 

The ship split in two: the bow sank to the ocean floor at a speed of 35 miles (56.3 km) per hour, and the stern at a speed of 50 miles (80.4 km) per hour. — phys.org

 

18. An iceberg that collided with a ship could rise 100 feet (30.4 m) above the water.

 

It is estimated that the iceberg that the Titanic crashed into was between 50 (15.2 m) and 100 feet (30.4 m) above the water. The total length of the iceberg is believed to have been between 200 (60.9 m) and 400 (121.9 m) feet. — ndtv.com

 

19. It took more than three years to build the ship.

Beginning in 1909 and for three years, White Star Line's Titanic was built at the Harland & Wolff shipyard in Belfast, Ireland. — history.com

 

20. When the ship sank, the temperature of the sea water was below zero.

 

The water temperature was only -2 degrees Celsius, according to measurements taken by Captain Stanley Lord from the Californian, which was nearby when the Titanic sank. cruisehive.com

 

21. Less than a third of all people on board the ship survived.

 

Only 705 passengers and crew returned home. — history.com

 

22. First class passengers had access to a heated swimming pool.

 

First-class travelers received exquisite service and numerous luxuries as they could afford. First-class perks for the wealthy included reading in the library, playing tennis on the squash court, dining in upscale Parisian cafés, and relaxing in tea gardens. —en.wikipedia.org

 

23. The anthem "Nearer My God To Thee" was reportedly the last song played by the band, according to both British and American passengers, but this cannot be verified.

The anthem was sung to different tunes in the two countries, adding to the uncertainty. —en.wikipedia.org

 

24. "Titanic" is under water at a depth of 3800 m

 

Almost 2.5 miles (4 km) below the surface of the ocean, about 370 miles (595 km) from the Canadian province of Newfoundland, lies the wreck of the Titanic. The ship split in two, leaving a 2,000-foot (600 m) long gap in the seabed separating the bow and stern. —en.wikipedia.org

 

25. The Titanic cost over $7.5 million to build ($200 million adjusted for inflation).

 

In the early 20th century, the cost to build the huge ship was estimated at $7.5 million, or $183.4 million today. — history.com

 

26. The hull of the boat received a 91 meter hole from hitting an iceberg.

 

The Titanic's captain, Edward Smith, thought the ship had just skimmed over the tip of the iceberg, but when the crew inspected the impact site, they found that five compartments had already begun to fill with water and the bow was already sinking. maritimequest.com

 

27. Only two baths were available to all third class passengers.

 

There were 706 third-class passengers on the Titanic, who paid between £3 and £8 in fares, but only had two bathtubs at their disposal. —books.google.com

 

28. The last dinner of first class travelers consisted of 11 courses.

 

The menu included appetizers like oysters, entrees like filet mignon and sweets like chocolate and vanilla eclairs. —books.google.com

 

29. After the crash, only a small number of bodies were found.

Only 306 bodies were recovered from the icy water by rescue ships. Halifax, Nova Scotia received a large number of deaths. — reuters.com

 

30. There were 840 cabins in total, 416 first class cabins, 162 second class and 262 third class.

 

31. The ship was just under 900 feet (274 m) long.

 

The Titanic was the largest ship of its day, at 882 feet 9 inches long. At around 1,200 feet (365.7 m) long, Royal Caribbean's Symphony of the Seas is currently the largest cruise ship in the world. — titanicuniverse.com

 

32. It took 20 horses to transport the main anchor.

 

The weight of the ship's main anchor was over 30,000 pounds, or 16 tonntertons, England, to Dudley railway station, England. — globetrotting.com.au

 

33. It took more than seven decades to search for the wreckage of the ship.

 

After the Titanic sank in 1912, its wreckage was not discovered until 73 years later, in 1985. Using a robotic submarine, the wreckage was located by Dr. Robert D. Ballard of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts and a team of American and French experts. — history.com

 

34. Many documentaries and feature films have been made about the Titanic. The most notable of these are:

"Titanic" by Jean Negulesco (1953), "The Sinking of the Titanic" by Roy Baker (1958) and "Titanic" by James Cameron (1997). — wikipedia.org

 

35. Six pre-collision iceberg warnings.

 

Captain Edward Smith apparently never received the most important iceberg warning due to the lack of the MSG prefix. The captain had to personally acknowledge the receipt of the message under this designation. The chief radio operator dismissed the message as unimportant because it lacked the MSG prefix. —en.wikipedia.org

 

36. Edward John Smith was the captain of the Titanic and died when the ship sank on its maiden voyage.

 

37. Only three of the four chimneys of the Titanic worked.

The big ship had four chimneys (also known as funnels), but only three of them emitted smoke. The other was used only for ventilation, giving the ship a regal air. — historyonthenet.com

 

38. Specific bacteria slowly devour debris.

 

At some point, the rust-eating bacteria will completely consume whatever remains of the Titanic at the bottom of the ocean. Halomonas titanicae, a type of microbe that can attach itself to steel surfaces, creates the rust visible on the debris. ocean.si.edu

 

39. 6,000 artifacts were recovered from the crash site.

 

Many people are interested in artifacts from the Titanic era. A violin sold at auction in the UK in 2013 for $1.7 million was one of 6,000 artifacts discovered. In 2011, the Titanic project was sold for $336,000. — lastampa.it

 

40. John Jacob Astor IV was the richest man on board.

 

With a net worth of nearly $150,000,000 at the time, the heir to the Astor family fortune was by far the wealthiest person on board the ship. He died with the ship. nationalarchives.gov.uk

 

41. The first iceberg was noticed at 23:30 on April 14.

The iceberg was discovered by a sentinel who hastily sounded the alarm. To avoid colliding with him, the ship quickly turned at a high angle, but it was too late. —en.wikipedia.org

 

42. The first lifeboat could accommodate 65 people, but only 28 people were able to board.

 

43. The Titanic sank at 2:20 am on April 15, 1912. Two and a half hours earlier, the ship had collided with an iceberg.

 

44. Less than a minute elapsed between the discovery of the iceberg and the disaster.

 

The Titanic is said to have collided with the iceberg just 37 seconds after the iceberg was first spotted. — historic-uk.com

 

45. Three dogs were rescued from the ship

There were nine dogs on board, but only three survived: two Spitz and a Pekingese. — liverpoolmuseums.org.uk

 

46. New evidence suggests that a hull fire may have been the cause of the ship's sinking.

 

According to the documentary Titanic: New Evidence, the accident may have been caused by a fire that broke out on board the ship shortly before it left port. Journalist Senan Moloni claims that continuous fire in the ship's hull may have caused the metal to shatter. Before the ship sailed, the fire raged for three weeks. huffpost.com

 

47. 40,000 people met the steamer "Carpathia" when she arrived in New York with more than 700 survivors.

 

48. There were 8 musicians on board the Titanic, all of them worked for the Liverpool agency The CW and FN Black.

 

49. It is generally accepted that there were about 2200 passengers and crew members on the ship.

 

50. About 100,000 people were present at the launch of the ship. May 31, 1911 in Belfast, the huge liner "White Star" first went on the water.

The descent, lasting just over a minute, was watched by about 100,000 people, or nearly a third of Belfast's population. — history.com

 

51. The ship burned about 825 tons of coal per day.

 

The Titanic was far from being a light ship and weighed nearly 46,000 tons. This massive ship heated 29 boilers, consuming approximately 825 tons of coal per day in 159 furnaces.

 

52. Royal Mail Steamer (RMS - royal mail steamer) Titanic was the official name of the ship.

 

From the middle of the 19th century, people used the abbreviation RMS for Royal Mail steamers. This served as a distinction, because mail had to be delivered on time, and ships were fined for being late. The name was given to about 200 ships, including the Titanic. —en.wikipedia.org

 

53. The maximum speed of the "Titanic" now. A typical cruise ship today travels at 20 knots, or 23 miles (37 km) per hour. The world's largest cruise ship, Royal Caribbean's Harmony of the Seas, has a top speed of 25 knots, or about 29 miles (46.6 km) per hour. —simple.wikipedia.org

 

54. In 2012, underwater robots took over 100,000 pictures of a shipwreck.

More than 100,000 images of hundreds of objects that were likely part of the ship were obtained by the expedition, which sent underwater robots to the wreck and used sonar to study the objects. A 3 by 5 mile (4.8 by 8 km) debris field can be mapped. — theglobeandmail.com

 

55. Alcoholic drinks and cigars were readily available on board.

 

The ship carried 1,500 bottles of wine and 20,000 bottles of beer, as well as 8,000 cigars, all available to first class passengers. — 247wallst.com

 

56. The Titanic made its maiden voyage from Britain to America. The outer route was to be Southampton, England - New York, USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

-1
Comment
Share
Copy link
Linkedin
Messenger
Whatsapp
Pinterest
Vkontakte
Telegram
Cancel
You have reposted this topic!
You have canceled this repost!